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FILM FUN 



L fl 



Aft d The Magazine of Fun, Judge's 
Library and Sis Hopkins' Own Book Combined 



>_ 



^ Notice to Reader ' 



When you finish 
reading this magazine, 
place a one cent stamp 
alongside of this no- 
tice, hand to any postal 
employee, and it will 
be sent to our soldiers 
andsailors atthef ront 



PRICE 10 CENTS 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.00 PER YEAR 

JANUARY 




COPYRIGHT, 1918, 
BY LESLIE-JUDGE CO., NEW YORK 



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I iiiiuiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiuiiiiinii ■ mi > 111111111 minium 11111 111 inn 11 11 1 111 1 11 11 11 1111 iinuuii iiinni 1 iiuinii 11 1111 11 1111 11 11 uiiiniii 11 1111 iininniii 11 1 iiiiinu 11 1 111 n mini! niiiiniuiiinnumn 

THE HUN AT PLAY 




THE Bodies were bored. To be shut up for three months in a 1 
deserted chateau in the heart of Normandy was no small hard- | 
ship for five Prussian officers accustomed to the gayeties of Ber- 
lin. To be sure, during- their enforced stay, they had found entertain- | 
ment in acts of vandalism, after the manner of their kind. Mutilated I 
family portraits, priceless Flemish tapestries cut to ribbons, fine old I 
mirrors cracked by pistol bullets, and the hacked and broken furni- 
ture that littered the spacious apartments of the chateau, all bore 
eloquent testimony to the favorite pastime of the Hun. But even 1 
this sport for the moment had palled. Outside the rain descended I 
in torrents. As the brandy and liqueur passed from hand to hand, jj 
suddenly the Captain has an inspiration. A soldier is despatched | 
to a nearby city. In the evening he returns with five handsome j 
girls. How the table is laid and the fun grows fast and furious as jj 
the champagne flows; how in an access of alcoholic patriotism toasts j 
are proposed by the chivalrous Prussians reflecting on the braver}' of 
the men and the virtue of the women of France; what happens to 
the Baron at the hands of one of the girls — a patriot even if affile 
dejoie — is told as only Maupassant could tell it in the story Mademoi- 
selle Fiji found in lliis superb Verdun Edition of 

The Complete Works of | 
Guy de Maupassant 1 



| The First and Only Adequately 

Illustrated American Edition 

| TT is a remarkable fact that, without ex- 

1 1 ception, editions of Maupassant here- 

I tofore accessible to the American reading 

1 public have contained illustrations not only 

1 crude in execution but, in I heir relation to 

1 the text, nothing- less but grotesque cari- 

1 catures. 

This was a grave injustice to the author. 

■ as well as a reflection on the great body of 
1 American artists, which includes many of 
1 the world's most distinguished illustrators. 
g The frontispiece illustrations for the 17 volumes 
g of the Verdun Edition of Guy de Maupassant 
g have been specially made by the talented Ameri- 
H can artist J. E. Allen, and they will add immes- 
g nrably lo the enjoyment of this Complete Collec- 
g tion of the author's works by their graphic inter- 
g pretation of the various characters and types 
g found in his stories. 

| A SPECIALLY LOW BEFORE-PUB- 
LICATION PRICE 

1 while the Verdun Edition is going through the 
= press, will be named, confidentially, to those 
whose applications reach us in advance of publi- 
g cation. Applicants for sets after that date will 
g have to pay a higher price. To get the advantage 
S of this low price Sign and Mail Coupon To-Day. 

YOU ASSUME NO OBLIGATION 

=iiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiii[iiiiiiiiiii:[iiiii!iiiuiiiiiijiiiiiniiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiitffmiiiimmi.iiiiiiii!iiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiMi| 

1 BRUNSWICK SUBSCRIPTION CO. F.F.1-18 1 

Brunswick Building, /Vew York City. 

1 Without obligation on my part, pleasesend full 

g particulars, with special hefore-publieation 

g price and terms, of the Verdun Edition of the 

g Complete Works of Guy de Maupassant, 17 J 

volumes, cloth. If quotations are satrsfactory 

1 I will notify you promptly to reserve a set for 

m me for delivery when published. Otherwise, 

g I waive all right to the special price quoted. 

f Name | 

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Over 350 Novels, Stories, 

Poems 

/^UY de MAUPASSANT ob- 
^^ served life with a miraculous 
completeness and told what be saw 
with an intensity of feeling and with 
a precision which leaves the reader 
delighted and amazed. He was the 
most exact transcriber of life in liter- 
ature. His novels and stories, all of 
which will appear in the Verdun Edi- 
tion, leave the impression of the clear- 
est, frankest, most solid reality ; as if 
each phase of life in every stratum of 
society had been detached piece by 
piece, stripped of all conventional 
complexity, and so presented to the 
reader. His was the incomparable 
gift of understanding life, which is 
the heritage only of the greatest 
geniuses. 

In comparison with his novels and 
stories all others appear artificial and 
labored. Maupassant does not preach, 
argue, concern himself with morals, 
and has no social prejudices. He 
describes nothing that he has not seen 
and shows men and women just as he 
found them. -His language is so 
simple and strong that, it conveys the 
exact picture of the thing seen. His 
choice of subjects is always redeemed 
by an exquisite irony and art. 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllll 



The Best English Translation 

Complete— Literal— Unexpurgaled j 

WHILE the eyes of the whole world | 
are centered on our gallant ally, J 
France, and her heroic struggle against = 
a ruthless invader; with the ghastly pic- J 
ture before us of the brutal atrocities j 
committed by an inhuman foe on her | 
civilian population, her women and j 
young girls; while the smoke still rises ■ 
from her destroyed cities and profaned | 
temples, and the crash and thunder of | 
her guns is heard from Calais to the 1 
Vosges as she hurls defiance at her 1 
treacherous enemy — nothing could be 1 
more timely than the publication of this 1 
Complete Collection of the works of 1 
France's most gifted son, Guy de Mau- 1 
passant, in whom realism reached its ■ 
culminating point and the short story | 
the perfection of its art, and whose 1 
stories of the Franco-Prussian War, told | 
with relentless realism, will be read now I 
with a new interest and a fuller appreci- 
ation of their verity in the light of cur- 1 
rent events. But if such stories as Boide § 
de Suif, Madame Sauvage, and Mademoi- J 
selle Fiji urst raised Maupassant to the | 
highest pinnacle of literary fame, that | 
position was rendered secure for all time ] 
by his other matchless series of novels j 
and stories covering the widest range of | 
human emotion and experience in which | 
every kind of character, good or bad, y Tekled ma- 
terial for his art. Literally translated, all these g 
will appear in the Verdun Edition whjch will be g 
published soon in a form unapproached by any - g 
previous edition ever offered on this side of the g 
Atlantic. E 



JAN -4 1918 




PARAMOUNT 



SESSUE HAYAKAWA 



That " East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet " would seem to be 
disproved by the career of this star of the silent drama. The deserved popularity of his 
work indicates that truth and artistry are recognized alike in all lands. " The Secret Game," 
his latest release, is a story of intrigue and diplomacy likely to contribute to the growth of 

friendly relations between the nations. 



. 




Film Fun 

EDITORIALS 




Who Is To Blame? 

"% 7"ERY recently the statement was made at a meeting of 
the Women's Press Club in New York City, with 
many writers of prominence in attendance, that the elimi- 
nation of the objectionable in films is hardly to be hoped 
for under existing conditions. The speaker said that the 
Board of Censors as now constituted is practically of no 
avail, as it is composed of members representing manu- 
facturers, whose interests, of course, they respect. She 
has been engaged for some time, she said, in the work of 
suppressing the salacious in picture plays, and had found 
there are more of this character than there are good ones. 
Her interest in the matter was aroused by questions of her 
five-year-old daughter which could not be answered. She 
further declared that she had secured the condemnation of 
110 pictures in the city of Brooklyn which the censors had 
passed, and had them withdrawn from exhibition in that 
city. 

Now Film Fun expects this to stir up a hornet's nest. 
That is our hope and purpose. We do not know whether 
the lady is right or not. We do know that, notwithstand- 
ing the able Board of Censors we are alleged to have, films 
without number are being released right along containing 
scenes shameful alike to actors and producers and that 
ought to be prohibited. Their effect is as harmful to 
moral health as the habit of morphine or cocaine is to bod- 
ily usefulness and well being. They poison life, and this 
generation will have to pay a price in vitiated manhood 
and womanhood which we cannot afford. 

Somebody is to blame. We are willing to see scenario 
writers, producers, directors, stars and censors start a Kil- 
kenny cats' encounter to place the responsibility where it 
belongs. We're able and anxious to referee the engage- 
ment. We believe good will come of it. That's why we 
started it. If the films, now so essential a part of life, are 
to aid as much as they ought to win the war and bring or- 
der out of the after-the-war chaos, they must stimulate 
clean living and right thinking. The morbid and salacious 
must be barred. 

Who is to blame? We are trying to find out. 

Is Resistance Useless? 

T^HE CONTROVERSY regarding the war tax on films 
goes merrily on. The producers scored when Judge 
Phillips, of Cleveland, decided exhibitors must pay the fif- 
teen cents a roll claimed by exchanges. Lively warfare 
has followed. An important meeting held in Washington 
is likely to result in remedial legislation, or at least an in- 



terpretation of some of the law's provisions which are in- 
equitable. 

But there seems a singular unanimity regarding the ad- 
mission tax. "The ultimate consumer pays" is the deci- 
sion arrived at and announced. Film Fun's seems, so far, 
to be the only dissenting opinion, but there has hardly been 
time yet for the fans to be heard from. The box-office re- 
ceipts will tell their decision in regard to the matter. 
When picture theater patrons consider the fact that 25 
cents, which is about the average price for admission with 
the tax added, will buy a war thrift stamp, they will prob- 
ably decide to buy the stamp and stay at home. They're 
in earnest about Hooverizing and winning this war, and 
they are developing some ideas, too, about getting their 
money's worth. Profiteering is no more tolerable in pic- 
tures than in commodities. The odd cents added, in ex- 
cess of the tax, by many picture theaters, total a very con- 
siderable sum, which goes into the coffers of the theaters. 
The public ought not to pay this. 

Growth of the Industry 

T^LEVEN new corporations to engage in the film business 
in some of its branches were chartered from Albany, 
N. Y., the week ending October 20th. That seems to jus- 
tify our prophecy that it was a business likely to prove at- 
tractive to investors. The largest of the new companies 
claims to have a million dollars to promote direct dealing 
between producer and exhibitor, eliminating the middleman 
and his tolls. One concern, perhaps, can't bring about so 
great a revolution, but it is a move in the right direction. 
Signs multiply that motion pictures are to be brought up to 
the common-sense level of business principles that prevail 
in other lines. It is a worth-while undertaking, but the 
elimination of waste will surely "make countless thousands 
mourn." 

<*• 
We've had words before, in these columns, about sce- 
narios; we claim and believe that stars can, if they will, 
put a stop to objectionable photoplays by refusing to appear 
in unworthy roles. It is more important just now than you 
might think, unless you remember that plays that are good 
enough will go to the little theaters back of the trenches 
Let everything we send be as nearly as possible up to the 
standard of the men we send — fine, clean and wholesome 

«■?- 
We're beginning a new year, and if Film Fun has any 

brickbats or bouquets rightly coming from its readers, 

won't you take time to tell us anything you think ought to 

go into Film Fun's 1918 resolutions. 







The real "All Alaska Sweepstakes" race is a glorious demonstration of dog ability, loyalty and enthusiasm. For 
the many fans and fanciers who for good and sufficient reasons cannot be "among those present" in Alaska, 
Thomas H. Ince arranged a reel encore performance at Truckee. Clara Williams claims she can manage 'em, 

all right, and that they're winners. 




Lois Gardner, as "Eve," in the Mena Company's 
production, "By Superstrategy, " is here seen 
picking her costume. She is pleased that the 
climate in which fig trees attain perfection makes 
such apparel comfortable. 



Music at the Photoplay 

By JAMES GA BELLE 

The villain's chased o'er hill and plain, 

The guns pop free on every hand, 
I feel a thrill in every vein, 

The pianist plays "Kennst Du Das Land?" 
The hero in the ballroom shines, 

The merry throng's a pleasant sight, 
And now the lone piano whines 

"Ob, Where's My Wand'ring Boy To-night?" 

The maid is in the villain's pow'r, 

Her shrieks, alas ! no mercy win, 
And then, in that exciting hour, 

We hear a selection from "Chin Chin." 
The hero to her rescue flies, 

Low steals the sound of "Miserere." 
But when the gray-haired father dies, 

Loud boom the notes of "Tipperary." 

A reception now is at its height, 

The guests all radiate good cheer, 
The pianist then with all her might 

Grinds out "The World Is Sad and Drear." 
The play hastes to a happy end, 

The poor maid's woes at last are o'er, 
And as we slowly doorward wend, 

The pianist plays "I'll Smile No More." 




ARDSLEY-ART 



"MISS 1917" 



The name part in one of the stage successes of the year, and the star part in a play she 
wrote, are honors which justify the hard work that goes with them, thinks this new star of 
the screen, Marion Davies whose " Runaway Romany " has lately been produced by The 

Ardsley Art Film Corporation. 



My Experiences While Filming "Runaway Romany" 



By MARION DAVIES 



I" AM a movie fan and have watched 
-*- with open-eyed astonishment some of 
the daring feats performed by the frail 
heroines of the pictures, longing to do 
some of the stunts myself, but hardly hop- 
ing to so literally live the part as I have 
since done. 

From time to time I have written short 
stories. One of them I rewrote in scenario 
form and showed it to some of my friends. 
They thought it was so good that they asked 
for the privilege of sub- 
mitting it to one of 
the producing managers. 
The result was that the 
film corporation to whom 
my scenario was submit- 
ted accepted the story 
andgave me a chance to 
really be in pictures. 

Their offer to have me 
play the leading part of 
my own story, ' ' Runaway 
Romany, ' ' startled me. I 
had at various times 
thought it would be great 
fun to appear in a mov- 
ing picture play, but 
when the opportunity 
came, I had real stage 
fright or something like 
it. The film people as- 
suaged my fears; they 
were very kind and as- 




ARDSLEY-ART 



As the heroine, "Romany.' 




ARD8LEY-ART 

Nothing in that constables' "Guide to Duty" indicated an exception in the 
case of film players. The train came and went, and not a camera crank 

was turned. 



ARDSLEY-ART 

I lived in an auto, and 

my clothes consisted of 

my gypsy costume and 

a pair of pajamas. 



sured me that my story 
was really good and that 
they were offering me an ex- 
ceptionally fine opportunity 
to be a regular star in the 
film world. 

In the play I am sup- 
posed to be rescued from an ocean 
liner. The director chartered a 
boat, and we went up the Hudson 
River, and I was told to jump into 
the water. I demurred. The river 
looked so far away. It may have 
been only 15 feet — it looked 100. 
The director insisted. Then I 
jumped. I took, they tell me, a 
beautiful dive; but can you im- 
agine my feelings upon being told 
that the camera man had missed 
it? He had waited so long for 
me to make up my mind to make 
the plunge that, when I finally 
went over the side, his good right 
arm was suffering from camera 
cramp. The dive had to be re- 
peated. 

One of the most amusing ex- 
periences was when we went out 
into Westchester County to make 




In Westches- 
ter County we 
filmed my es- 
cape from the 
gypsies. 



ARDSLEY-AHT 



my escape from the gypsy camp. The director picked out a 
nice, quiet railroad station north of Yonkers and prepared 
to film me escaping on a fast express, while the chief, 
my gypsy admirer and other members of the cast pursued 
in vain down the platform. With me were other mem- 
bers of the company, including 
Joseph Kilgour, Pedro de Cordoba, 
Matt Moore and Ormi Hawley. 
We gathered on the platform of 
the Dunwoodie station. Time- 
tables had been consulted and a 
ticket purchased for the hurried 
departure of Romany; but best- 
laid plans "gang aft agley." The 
plotters reckoned without the loy- 
alty to duty of the Westchester 
constables. With unusual detec- 
tive ability two minions of the law 
discovered that I was not a boy, 
in spite of my trousers. "There 
is a law against young women's 
masquerading in men's clothing," 
they stated with importance. In 
vain did I protest that we were 
film folks and that as soon as the 
scene was taken I was going to 
leave Westchester County, any- 
way. It was all of no avail. 
There was nothing in fhe index of 
the constables' "Guide to Duty" 
that indicated that an exception 
might be made in the case of a 
young girl who was merely play- 
ing at being a boy. The train 




Two minions of the law discovered that 
I was not a boy. 



came and went, and not a camera crank was turned. 
Again was proved the magic of the pass good for two. 
Each constable was handed a slip of paper, entitling the 
bearer to two of the best seats at the opening performance 
on Broadway. For good measure the constables were per- 
mitted to be a part of the pursu- 
ing mob when the next train was 
finally allowed by war schedule 
to pass the Dunwoodie station. 

Talk about work. Anybody who 
has the idea that a movie player's 
life is a merry one and nothing 
else is greatly mistaken. In 
one week I have acted on Long 
Island, in Connecticut, New Jersey 
and various parts of New Ycrk 
State from Manhattan to theAdir- 
ondacks. I lived in an automo- 
bile. My clothes consisted of a 
gypsy costume, a pair of pajamas 
and all sorts of things that actors 
of the speaking stage never wear 
in public. I celebrated the Fourth 
of July by doing a state ball in the 
grand ballroom of one of our best 
hotels, by filming scenes in the 
Pennsylvania Station, at a Chelsea 
village rooming house and in a 
crowded East Side street. 

Playing the star of "Runaway 
Romany" was supposed to be my 
vacation, but it was one of the 
busiest and most exciting vaca- 
tions I have ever experienced. 



Live and Lear 



n 




Fox studio children at school and their teacher, Miss Gertrude Mess- 

inger. They come from stage to class-room in the costumes called for 

by the picture they are at work on. "The Mikado" was being filmed 

the day this picture was taken. 



TN THE corner of the great studio that William Fox has 
erected in California, where the sun lingers longest, is 
the happiest place in all the world, for it is here that the 
children's theater has been made, with its big stage, its 
dressing-rooms, playrooms, and at one side the schoolhouse. 
The whole story of child life is contained in these struc- 
tures, but they are built for a purpose that could never 
have been dreamt of until these days. 

Here is truly the home of the fairy and the wonder peo- 
ple of the ages, for in it dwell, during all the hours when 
the sun is shining, the little people who spend their lives 
and who give all the joy of their being to the creation of 
wonderful pictures, that all the world may know, in a new 
form, the marvelous stories of the ages. Nothing like this 
was ever thought of before — the gathering together of chil- 
dren in their own studio, to make pictures that children 
love, so that all the world may be made happy. 

For some time now these children have been together, 
making these wonderful pictures, living the lives of fairies, 
little heroes and heroines, villains, and all the other char- 
acters that go to make up wonder tales. Their success 
was such that it became evident they must have a place 
quite of their own, with all the big things that were neces- 
sary for their work, and all the little things that were es- 
sential to their comfort and happiness. For while the fairy 



tales were being made, the childhood that all little ones 
had a right to expect must not be taken from the little 
folks who make them. It was surely proper that those who 
were giving their lives in creating happiness should be 
happy themselves. 

Very great care has been given to this corner of the 
studio. The stage itself is the very best. It is not merely 
a skeleton of steel and concrete, but it is an affair that has 
pretentions to good looks, where no cold iron shows, and 
no ugly corners are allowed to exist. All the things that 
men's minds have been able to devise to make it less 
difficult to create moving pictures is incorporated in it. 

Just beside it is the schoolhouse, a real schoolhouse, 
with desks and benches, and a green blackboard which is 
quite the proper thing in blackboards, and globes, and all 
the books with big print by which little children are taught 
to be wise. And a really-truly teacher hears the lessons. 
There are the most wonderful playrooms, baths, a swim- 
ming pool, and between the buildings grass and flowers are 
planted. Outside is a great row of palm trees that gives it 
all a frame. 

Here Jack began his career with the beanstalk, and 
Aladdin found his wonderful lamp. It was here that the 
brilliant story of "The Mikado" had its start, and "The 
Babes in the Woods" was filmed. 



Comments of 



a 



F 



r e e 



a n c e 



By LINDA A. GRIFFITH (MRS. DAVID W. GRIFFITH) 

jiiiiiiiiiiniiinn^ 

The writer is well known in the moving picture world. She began her career as a mov- j 

| ing picture actress with the Biograph Company when it was the pioneer in this field of 1 

| operation. She has since been prominently connected with the Kinemacolor and other § 

| companies and more recently was the star in her striking sociological play "Charity." j 



IT SHALL COME TO PASS 
T AM SOMEWHAT surprised that 
■*> my little comment in Film Fun, 
under the heading "Don't Blame the 
Movies Too Much, ' ' should have led 
that eminent producer, Mr. Herbert 
Brenon, to conclude that I entertained 
some doubt as to the permanence 
of the motion picture business. Mr. 
Brenon writes me: "I snatch a mo- 
'ment to tell you how much I ap- 
preciate your monthly article in 
' Film Fun. Keep it up. You are 
' one of the few fearless critics who 
'know what they are writing about 
'in the world to-day. You must 
'never, however, write such a sen- 
' tence as this : ' If the movie passes 
'away, which let us hope it never 
'will do.' I am astonished. Don't 
'you realize that this is one of the 
'biggest steps forward in science, 
'and that we have not 
'yet touched upon its 
'greatest mission, the 
'spreading of great 
' messages, spiritual, 
'historical and moral? 
'The movies will never 
'die." Mr. Brenon 
does not believe in the 
permanence of the mov- 
ies more than I do. Ten 
years ago, in the early 
days of the Biograph, 
which motion picture 
concern I was a part of, 
the struggle to secure 
public recognition of the 
mission of the movies 
began. I foresaw their 
mission and their future 
even as Mr. Brenon 
points it out. In this 
connection I recall an 
interesting incident that 
took place in these early 
days, when Mr. Griffith 
had been but a very short 




CAMPBELL STUDIOS 

LINDA A. 



GRIFFITH 




GILLAM SERVICE 

David W. Griffith taking pictures at the front in 

France. No danger deters the man who believes 

that the mission of pictures is to teach the truth. 



time with the Biograph Company. 
He was then considering his engage- 
ment in motion pictures only as a 
stepping-stone to better things on the 
stage — merely a temporary make- 
shift. He received an offer to play 
in a theatrical summer stock com- 
pany at Peaks Island, Maine, and I 
remember I did quite a bit of talking 
to dissuade him from going there. 
Had he accepted that offer, the his- 
tory of the motion picture would no 
doubt read far differently. No one 
had more unswerving faith, greater 
hopes or more confidence in them 
than the writer. My faith now in 
their permanence, not only as a mode 
of artistic expression, but also as a 
means of impressing great spiritual 
truths, of teaching historical sub- 
jects and presenting psychological 
studies, is stronger than ever. From 
the depths of my heart I 
agree with you, Mr. 
Brenon, ' ' The movies 
will never die, but step 
forward and forward." 

THE MAGAZINE ON 
THE SCREEN 
Apparently the only 
mission of the first mov- 
ing pictures was to excite 
the curiosity of the be- 
holder and make him 
wonder how it was done. 
It is true that there was 
entertainment in all this, 
but the shock of sur- 
prise the visitor had on 
seeing the Empire State 
Express train seemingly 
bearing down directly 
upon him from the screen 
gave an unexpected 
thrill. I have been told 
this, at least, by several 
persons who saw this sen- 
sational film of the pio- 




GOLDWYN 

Mary Garden wears this gown in "Thais." 

neer days. How far the movies have advanced since those 
days ! How much farther they will go when they visualize 
the wonderful lessons that educators, teachers and preach- 
ers are now endeavoring, in the old, humdrum way, to im- 
press upon a too often unimpressionable public ! The 
tendency in every moving picture house of high quality at 
this time is to have at least one educational film. There 
may be filmed the drama, the comedy and the travelogue, 
the last with an educational quality; but there is also 
shown on the screen something that teaches both young 
and old an easy lesson in botany, ethnology, entomology, 
architecture or zoology. The wonderful thing about all 
this is the avidity with which the public devours these edu- 
cational films — the same public that would not go across 
the street to hear the most cultured professor deliver a lec- 
ture on an educational subject. I notice in this connection 
the recent effort of the Paramount Company to establish, 
as a part of its regular service, an educational film, and in 
this connection to maintain a sort of contributing editorial 
department covering the field of science, art and the whole 
realm of public interest in pictorial displays. That the 
subject is not taken up in a haphazard way is disclosed by 
the first announcement just made by the Paramount that it 
has selected, as its advisers or contributors in its educa- 
tional department, the following well-known editors: Ger- 
trude B. Lane, of the Woman's Home Companion; Carl 
Hovey, of the Metropolitan; John A. Sleicher, of Leslie's; 
E. F. Warner, of Field and Stream ; Waldemar Kaempffert, 
of the Popular Science Monthly ; and Bruce Barton, of Every 
Week. Good work ! 

JUSTIFIABLE PROFANITY 
"The Price Mark," a Paramount-Ince release, is suffi- 
ciently boring to discourage any but very brief comment. 
The acting and the action are so insufferably slow through- 
out the five reels, it seemed as though there must have been 
twenty-five. I couldn't help but think of the story told 



about the late Bernhard Gillam, the eminent cartoonist of 
Judge, who suffered so keenly at the theater when witness- 
ing a play of inferior quality. As the acts progressed and 
things grew worse, he would bow his head in his hands, 
keep quietly repeating at regular intervals, "Oh, my God! 
Oh, my God !" and finally rise and make for the door with 
long strides. Only consideration for my neighbors kept 
me from the same exclamation, for, of course, it would 
be so much more noticeable when viewing the silent drama. 
Perhaps wondering what in the way of classic English the 
next sub-title would bring forth kept me in my seat. I cer-. 
tainly did not blame the heroine for saying, after this 
pretty phrase had been flashed upon the screen, ' ' As the re- 
turning sun kindles the voices of the morning birds," 
"Oh, my God, what is there for me to do?" I presume, 
as "The Price Mark" was shown at the Rialto, it was 
passed by the National Board of Censorship. Why, I 
wonder? 

DOES GOD FORGET? 
As a child at school I was very fond of my history. It 
still remains a fascinating subject, reading like a romance 
of intrigue, ambition, victory and defeat. What is the 
matter with the motion picture when it portrays history? 
Thinking over the historical film subjects I have seen, 
there stand only two as having a great, big appeal. These 
two are D. W. Griffith's "Birth of a Nation" and Benjamin 
Chapin's "Lincoln Cycle. " Here are two photoplays, es- 




PARAMOUNT 

This costume Geraldine Farrar wears in "The 

Woman God Forgot" is mostly feathers and 

breastplate. 




PARAMOUNT 



Miss Farrar, as the daughter of Montezuma, has a wealth of material to draw upon. 



sentially historical. To be able to sit through a showing 
of either one dry-eyed, one must have a heart of stone. 
'Way back in my motion picture memory there rises up 
another historical picture, one of the finest and greatest 
ever shown on a screen, a Pathe Film D'Art of nine years 
ago, called "The Assassination of the Due de Guise." 
There was a plot to that story, but most of all there was 
acting — acting that gripped and fascinated you. I believe 
Le Bargy was one of the cast, but not alone he, but every- 
one in the cast was a great actor. Surely history lends it- 
self as few other subjects do to screen portrayal. Then 
why must we sit and suffer through such nonsense as Theda 
Bara pathetically attempting to interpret "Cleopatra" and 
Geraldine Farrar in "The Woman God Forgot"? 

I remember very faintly General Wallace's "The Fair 
God," but remember it well enough to recall that it is a 
very lovely story. The legends of the Aztecs and the story 
of Cortez and Montezuma are full of such rich romance 
that it would seem not a difficult task to make an interest- 
ing picture from the wealth of material one has to draw 
upon. But the same old story is rehashed in "The Woman 
God Forgot." Miss Farrar plays the daughter of Monte- 
zuma, and Wallace'Reid a young officer of Cortez's band. 
How could they participate in a historical picture and not 
be shown representing different countries and meeting and 
falling in love? Of course they did! There is the inevi- 
table stupid love story, and then the inevitable battle 
scenes. Warfare of all the ages has not been neglected by 
the makers of motion pictures. Battles ! Battles and then 
battles ! To digress for a moment, I might observe that 



we have one thing to be grateful for: when they come to 
tell the history of the present world war in motion pic- 
tures, we won't see the son of the Kaiser having a mad love 
affair with our President's daughter. Women now have 
the vote and probably will make history in a different way 
than by having amours with foreign potentates, and rulers 
of nations will not let their countries go to ballyhack be- 
cause of affairs of the heart. But to resume: 

How long is the poor, long-suffering public to have 
thrown at it these spectacular pictures, containing thou- 
sands of feet of film showing the method of fighting olden 
battles on land and sea? "The W,oman God Forgot," 
showing life in the time of the Aztecs, is one of the stupid- 
est conglomerations it has ever been my misfortune to see. 
Are we never more to have acting in pictures? Miss Far- 
rar surely didn't act. Wallace Reid didn't act. Nobody 
gave us any acting, for there wasn't any in the picture, ex- 
cept the bit contributed by the little slave girl. Is the mo- 
tion picture to develop into an exercise for strengthening 
the optics? We have hearts and brains besides eyes. Are 
there to be no stories to touch the heart or appeal to the 
mind? This "Woman God Forgot" was mostly feathers 
and breastplates. 

I am so tired of looking at motion picture stars nude 
from the waist up, with the exception of breastplates and 
huge headdresses ! Too bad Comstock is dead ! But if we 
must have partly nude movie actresses who never act, then 
for pity's sake aren't there any to be had with physical 
beauty? Pictures like this Lasky one certainly need a 
beautiful woman star, for, I repeat, we aren't asked to 



think or feel, only to look ! If Miss Farrar would only 
sing! But she is dreadfully silent on the screen. I can 
only conclude that the movies must pay her much better 
than the opera. I hope she goes on making money. As 
long as she is a money-maker both for herself and for the 
company that presents her, she has my best wishes, for I 
only have to see her once. I confess to a little prejudice 
against Miss Farrar after I had read in the public prints 
that she had refused to stand up when the Star Spangled 
Banner was played. This prejudice, however, does not 
animate me in what I have had to say about her appear- 
ance in "The Woman God Forgot," because, following my 
rule, I give my calm, unprejudiced judgment of the merits 
of the case. 

But what does the title mean — "The Woman God For- 
got"? Our Scripture tells us that even the hairs of our 
head are numbered, and that not a sparrow falls to the 
ground without His knowledge. Surely if even the identity 
of a sparrow is maintained in God's universe, where does 
"The Woman God Forgot" — the God that does not forget 
anything — come in? It certainly won't be a hard task for 
me to forget "The Woman God Forgot, "for it certainly 
was a picture that art forgot. 

MISS COWL'S MISFIT. 

"The Spreading Dawn," a Goldwyn feature, makes its 
chief appeal through beautiful settings and a faithful re- 
production of old time atmosphere. The story, from the 
pen of Basil King, is told on the screen through the read- 
ing of a diary method. Times without number have elderly 
gentlemen, seated around the fireplace in their luxurious 
club rooms, smoking expensive cigars, listened to a story 
from one of the group which began, "When I was twenty- 
one." Then immediately it "faded out" and "dissolved" 
in the youth of twenty-one, who tells the first chapter in 
the story of why he is now either a sour old bachelor, a 
roue or a sad-faced, snowy-haired, kindly old gentleman. 
Women have not been as guilty as men in this regard, pos- 
sibly because they do not consider old age as attractive as 
men do, and feel they are not as interesting to the public 
as grandmothers or old maids as they are as a sweet young 
thing. 

On the screen youth is more valuable to the woman 
than the man. Many stars do not care to have the public 
see them "made up" as old women and Jane Cowl had 
courage in hiding her beauty under the grease paints that 
produce an old-age make-up. Her characterization of the 
cynical, elderly Patricia Vanderpyl was very well done. 
As young Patricia her performance lacked softness and 
feeling, and was too coldly modern. She was always so 
self-assured and master of herself that it was impossible 
for her to evoke sympathy. She never gave the impression 
of loving deeply, of being tender or giving much to the 
man she loved. Her make-up as young Patricia was 
possibly somewhat to blame for this, especially the stiff 
1917 way of doing her hair. Her corsetless figure, in 
a day of stiff stays, was entirely out of the picture. 
This was particularly noticeable in the archery scenes. 
Miss Cowl is not as effective or clever on the screen 



as she is on the stage. She brought no tears, though 
she had ample opportunity for doing so. Neither 
is Miss Cowl as beautiful on the screen as she is on the 
stage. Most people do not know that once before and pre- 
vious to her Goldwyn affiliation she had appeared on the 
screen. Some years ago I saw Miss Cowl in her first 
movie, "The Garden of Lies" — a very bad picture, the 
one redeeming feature of which was Miss Cowl's beauty. 
Perhaps in the intervening years we have become more ac- 
customed to beauty on the screen. The acting throughout 
was in competent hands. Orme Caldara was very convinc- 
ing as Anthony Vanderpyl. Mabel Ballin has much charm. 
Besides a very sweet, youthful beauty, she possesses great 
tenderness and sympathy, and in a minor role brought 
much to the picture. If sorrow had come into her life, it 
really would have hurt, and everyone in the audience would 
have wanted to help her. 

As to the story, it doesn't seem a bit probable that a 
woman would have so hardened her heart to the man she 
loved as to keep unopened through forty or more years his 
letter to her, written as he was dying. Even though she 
believed him false, even though he were false, she showed 
herself far from the ordinary "human" in so doing. The 
direction of the picture was clean-cut. The photography 
was beautiful. Some scenes in "The Spreading Dawn," 
were they "still photos" and not moving ones, would be 
worthy of a place on the walls of one's home. The love 
scenes by the lake, the ballroom scenes and the wedding 
deserve favorable comment. The floral decorations in the 
last two were quite as pretty as any I have ever seen in a 
motion picture. I would like Miss Cowl much better if 
she were not so perfectly marcelled at 4 a. m. 




S. L. Rothapfel, on a recent visit to California, 
paid a visit to the Fairbanks studio, where he was 
warmly welcomed by "Douglas D'Artigan" and 
his director, Allen Dwan. It would seem from 
the picture that Mr. Rothapfel would make good 
bayonet bait for some wild "Hun" and at the 
same time live to stage another of his famous 
shows at the Rialto. 



Winners in the Ne 



w 





The "American 
Maid, " with Edna 
Goodrich as star, be- 
gins the action in the 
front-line trenches in 
France and is destined 
for a finale in the 
trench theaters. May- 
be the boys are so fed 
up on realities that 
the battle scenes will 
only appeal to 'em as 
fit background to show 
by contrast the use 
and beauty of home 
life in the weaving of 
destiny. 




SELECT 

"Fisherman's Luck," a scene from " Shirley Kaye, " Clara Kim- 
ball Young's latest pictureplay. There are two rods in sight, 
therefore it is probable she had help; but at that it's a good catch, 
not counting "the big one that got away." 



VITAGRAPH 

This rather touching scene between 
Wallace MacDonald and Agnes Ayres, 
of Greater Vitagraph, attains to near- 
perfection, he says, because it was suf- 
ficiently rehearsed. 



Yea r's Popularity Contest 




PARAMOUNT-BLACKTON 



Wilfred Lucas and 
Violet Heming, in 
"The Judgment 
House," the first of 
the series of Gilbert 
Parker stories pictur- 
ized by J. Stuart 
Blackton. You can 
see there's a storm 
brewing, and no won- 
der; the other actor 
is named Crazy Thun- 
der. 



Ann Pennington, in "The Antics of Ann," never 

gives her family time between pranks to realize 

how altogether adorable she is. >» > 




A s \ "^ 



' ' A Daughter of 
Destiny" is the 
first picture Pe- 
trova has made 
since she be- 
came star of 
her own com- 
pany. What's 
the old adage 
— "A willful 
woman will 
have her way" 
— yea, verily. 





PARAMOUNT 



AMERICAN-MUTUAL 



Jack Pickford and Louise Huff, in "Jack and 

Jill." He's telling her a fairy story about 

how to make a fortune, but you can see they 

both believe it. 



Mary Miles Minter, in "The Mate of the 

Sally Ann," is a willing performer, but 

patience and fortitude must sustain her 

audience. 



"When a Man Marries His Trouble Begins" 



"THE HONEYMOON 

In Which Constance 
Talmadge Takes the 
Shine Out of the Moon 
and Puts 
Again. 



It Back 



Honeymoons are sup- 
posed to be made of 
treacle and whipped 
cream, but this one 
wasn't. Constance 
found a minister in 
her bathroom, which 
was no place for a 
minister to be, and 
she told him so. 




Here she has just heard that 
her lawful wedded husband, 
Earle Foxe, is nothing of the 
sort, and her honeymoon 
seems in danger of eclipse — 
also the clerk. 




SELECT 



After starting off on a second honeymoon, she is overtaken by a 

flock of well-meaning relatives and told that the divorce she ap< 

plied for when she caught Earle in a chorus girl's room has been 

granted and that she isn't married after all. 



SELECT 

The first day out, when everything 

looks like smooth sailing, even 

over Niagara. 




TRIANGLE 




Many a soldier in the 
trenches this winter 
will be made comfort- 
able by garments knit- 
ted by these actresses, 
at the Triangle Film 
Corporation's Culver 
City, Cal., studios. 
Belle Bennett and Irene 
Hunt play star parts in 
this as in the photo- 
plays staged here. 
That they all accom- 
plish much and enjoy it 
is very evident. 



/- 



AMERICAN-MUTUAL 

Here's evidence 
Secretary Daniels 
was wrong when 
he intimated knit- 
ting would keep 
women out of mis- 
chief. Mary Miles 
Minter has finished 
many garments 
in the army gray, 
but the mischief, 
well 

Madge Kennedy, 
Goldwyn's delight- 
f u 1 comedienne, 
can't take even 
war work serious- 
ly. Her smile goes 
as a good-will offer- 
ing, with the fruit 
of her industry. 





FOX 



Pauline Frederick 
aids the cause in 
three ways: plays 
she stars in go to 
trench theatres; 
generous donations 
go to relief funds, 
and in leisure 
hours she knits for 
the Red Cross. 

"It's always sum- 
mer weather" 
when June Caprice 
gets busy with 
these winter gar- 
ments for the boys 
in the trenches. Is 
she dreaming of 
some particular 
star in the Fox 
. service flag? 



u a r 



ng 



th 



r o n 



t fo 




PARAMOUNT 



Lteutenant Edward Wales, formerly of the American 

Film Company's force at Santa Barbara, Cal. He is 

explaining things to Edward Russell. 



H. H. Barter, technical expert at 

Culver City, now with U. S. S. 

Emergency Fleet Corporation. 



Tom Forman, star of Hollyw 
forces, enlisted in the Coast 
tillery when war was decla 



Freedom of the World 




■ i i nanirn 

Wesley Ruggles, Vitagraph director, a private in the U. S. Army, is 

shown here with his draft papers in hand, bidding good-by to his two 

stars, Edward Earle and Betty Howe. 



TRIANGLE WITZE 

Ray Griffith, in training at Camp Lewis, 

American Lake, Washington, which is a 

long way from his birthplace, Boston. 



Guarding the Front fo, |he Free do m of the W 



o r 



Id 




*"'"" M ™? W »le5. formerly of the American 
Film Compjmy s ,„ lve at Santa Bwb Mgcan 

explaining things to Edward Russell 



H. H. Barter, technical expert at 

Culver City, now with U. S. S. 

Emergency Fleet Corporation. 



PARAMOUNT llvffOO^ 

Tom Forman, star of HoW ^ 
forces, enlisted in the U» , 
tillery when war was o<* 



Wesley Ruggles, Vitagraph director, a private in the U. S. Army, is 

shown here with his draft papers in hand, bidding good-by to his two 

stars, Edward Earle and Betty Howe. 



Ray Griffith, in training at Camp Lewis, 

American Lake, Washington, which is a 

long way from his birthplace, Boston. 






A Roll of Honor 



.iii 



FILM FUN, in the course of its news gathering, discovered that a surprising number of 
men from every department of the motion picture industry have answered the call — actors, 
directors, camera men, operators, mechanics and craftsmen. The per cent, of patriots seems 
higher, and the assay in slackers lower, than in almost any other industry. For instance, five 
out of seven camera men for Chester, Inc., are in the service. All the returns aren't in yet ; 
we will supplement this from time to time. The lists so far received follow. 



GOLDWYN. John Melchoir Zwicki, Jr., formerly audi- 
tor, now first-class yeoman, paymaster's division, U. S. 
Naval Reserve; Edwin Robert Bergman, clerk, now chief 
yeoman, supply division, U. S. Naval Reserve; Tom Pow- 
ers, actor, after completion of ' ' The Auction Block, ' ' en- 
listed in the Avjation Corps. 

METRO. James M. Loughborough, formerly publicity 
manager, now first lieutenant in the regular army; James 
Kertyn, accountant, now with Naval Militia; William 
Canter, operator, and Alexander Duane, clerk, both now 
infantrymen ; Charles Jacobson, purchasing agent, now cor- 
poral quartermaster's department; Bennett Molter, assist- 
ant director, lieutenant Aviation Service; William Sweeney, 
studio assistant, James and John Sweeney, property men, 
Harold Wenstrom and Sherrie Harris, assistant camera 
men, Arthur Herman and Alfred Dagostine, property men, 
are all in the Navy; Jack Lamond, assistant camera man, 
is with the Marine Corps, making motion pictures for the 
government; Frederick Sittenham, assistant director, avi- 
ator, Navy; S. Rankin Drew, director, is now an aviator; 
Lester Cuneo, actor, and Louis Klopsch, publicity writer, 
are infantrymen; William Laird, bookkeeper, is in the 
Naval Militia; Louis Hooper, casting director, is with the 
ambulance corps (Canadian); John Waters, assistant di- 
rector, and Samuel Herbert, shipping clerk, are infantry- 
men; Hartley McVey, secretary, is a first lieutenant, Avi- 
ation Section, Signal Corps; Frank Cummings, assistant 
camera man, Aviation; Dwight Bergeman, camera man, 
and Irving Flisser, electrician, are now in the Navy; An- 
drew McDonald, electrician, Benny Pierpoali, assistant 
camera man, Carl W. Kimm, film cutter, Wells Pettibone, 
carpenter, Jack Christianson, assistant property man, Wil- 
liam Brown, scenic artist, and Earl Morris, chauffeur, are 
all infantrymen. 

PARAMOUNT (Eastern studios). Hector Turnbull, 
formerly with Scenario Department; Adolph Menjou, ac- 
tor, now First Lieutenant, U. S. Ambulance Corps; Albert 
Bassett, actor, private, 107th regt , U. S. A.; Harry I. 
Day, Serg't., U. S. Ambulance, formerly editor Paramount 
Progress; Lloyd Robinson, Publicity Dept., first-class yeo- 
man, U. S. N. ; Phillip Desmond, 9th Coast Defense, 14th 
Co., formerly ass't. to Mr. Day; L. O. Bull, shipping 
dep't., Corporal 22d Aero Squadron, U. S. A. ; Chas. Gart- 
ner, advertising dep't., Co. K., 71st, N. G. N. Y. ; James 
H. MacFarland, U. S. S. Narada, formerly in printing 
dep't.; Wm. J. Moore, shipping dep't., Serg't. 69th N. Y. 
infantry; Arthur Ryan, ass't. camera man; Joseph Good- 



rich, ass't. camera man, Sergeant Signal Corps; George 
Vanderminden, properties dep't., private 12th Coast Artil- 
lery; Paul Vogel, ass't. camera man, private 12th Coast 
Artillery; Jos. Hannafin, shipping department. 

UNIVERSAL. Universal City already has contributed a 
large number of men to the Liberty army. Many had en- 
listed long before Uncle Sam issued his stentorian call for 
the selective force, all being eager to serve as defenders of 
their country against the Teuton. The employees who enlist- 
ed are Maurice Blache, Douglas Bronston, J. R. Davis, Frank 
F. Elliott, Captain Sterret Ford, Chas. J. Gillman, John Good- 
rich, Bert Howell, H. Lee Huganin, Eric Richard Meisel, 
Joe Parker, H. B. Pritchard, Cecil Reed, P. L. Rhodes, 
Earnest Shields, Chas. Allen, Ted Brooks, Chas. Catron 
Casey, Cuthbert S. Fitz, Henry Gunstram, Carl W. Prager, 
W. Pasquette, Victor Rottman, W. Tomlinson, Clyde Gine- 
yard, Dan Welsh, Allen Watt, Jos. Neary, J. Hutchinson, 
S. Quincy. 

Universal Company's employees who responded to the 
first selective call to date are E. L- Berry, A. E. Buchner, 
Wm. Carlock, R. L. Cline, L T. Clappam, Robert Cum- 
mings, Tony Dellerocca, Eugene Dure, Clifton Godwin, W. 
V. Hemsley, Pierre Hungate, T. A. Johnson, Herbert Kirk- 
patrick, Clarence Kolster, A. C. W. McFarland, Stanley 
Mack, Mann Celia, Edward R. Meeker, Wm. Ormond, Don- 
ald Stewart, Harry Tryck, J. J. Waddell, H. H. Brown, 
Frank Barney, F. MacMasters, Frank Tedrick. 

At Universal City the following are called on the second 
draft: H. Murray, F. Uecker, S. Rockwell, J. M. McCloskey, 
J. McDonough, Edward Laemmle, R. E. Hodge, A. H. De 
Bur, Curley Stecker, C. Lacasse, Tony Ramirez, Joe Jarez, J. 
W. Carson, Jack Geurin, B. R. Paxton, Karl Bolzig, R. L. 
Brookbank, B. F. Reynolds, Harry Maguire, Ira B. Hoke, 
Roy F. B. Sofield, L. J. Dusseau, Arthur Smith, G. Wash- 
burn, W. Kirkpatrick, A. Tierney, H. R. Gollings, F. H. 
Marton, C. S. Monroe, E. W. Monroe, W. R. Munroe, C. 
Bardwell, John C. Geurvorst, H. Hassenberger, H. Mesick, 
M. Menasco, Henry Stahl, James Callahan, J. W. Neff, R. 
Snodgrass, Newton Koon, Tom Gibson, Wm. Gibson. 

Among those of the Universal's Home Office now in 
Uncle Sam's service are E. O. Guerney, Charles Wallach, 
John L. Schroeder and Joseph McKeever. The Leonia 
laboratory employees who are now seeing service are Ed- 
ward Carey, Joseph Durkee, William Bengel, Max Estreich, 
Ed. Simone, Jos. D. Ward, Albert Wolman, A. Applustille, 
D. Mannkin, R. Cameron, Oscar Cardenas, John Wormecke, 
William Roth, T. Kelly, Louis Barard. 



Intimate Interviews With Stage Stars 




Bryant Washburn interviewed these 

papooses by special appointment. He 

says they're "Good Indians." 



"Your flag and my flag," says little Ivy Ward, who divides the honors 
with her co-star, Mabel Taliaferro, in "Draft 258," a 
popular Metro war play lately released. 




PARAMOUNT 

Plots and plotters! The camera man caught George Beban and 
his small son at work on a new scenario. You can see how ut- 
terly impossible it would be for so well considered a theme to 
be other than a conspicuous success. 



Gloria Joy, leading lady for Balboa, and her 

director, Robert Ensminger, quitting work for 

the day. 




CREIGHTON HALE 

The life of the hero in a motion picture serial calls for calm and nerve. Plays such as 
Pathe's " The Seven Pearls " in which this popular youngster — beg pardon, young star — 
appears include real as well as " reel " hairbreadth escapes enough to satisfy the yearnings 
of the most adventurous. You can guess from the picture that Creighton Hale takes his 

work just seriously enough. 



Are We Downhearted? 




This picture doesn't require a caption, but if you've traveled much in the Arizona 
desert you will know how wise these folks are to "pack their troubles in their old 
kit bag and smile." The Fairbanks smile is contagious. ' 





"The Queen of the 
Sea, ' ' whose stage name 
is Annette Kellermann, 
is impersonating a lib- 
eral provider for the 
studio folks on location. 



Frank Keenan, in "Loaded Dice," is receiv- 
ing the congratulations on his election as Gov- 
ernor when in walks the gentleman who knows 
that the leading man once committed a crime. 
'Twas enough to make a man downhearted, 
but it didn't. 




PARAMOUST-ARTCRAFT 



Little Tula Belle and Robin McDoug- 
all, appearing as Tyttyl and Mytyl in 
"The Blue Bird," Maeterlinck's mas- 
terpiece, filmed under direction of 
Maurice Tourneur. 



TRIANGLE 

An entire class of U. S. war fliers from the North Island aviation 
training camp, San Diego, flew in to the Culver City studios 
and witnessed filming of "The Gown of Destiny." Belle Ben- 
nett, the star, welcomed them. 



The Camera Man in the War 

|iiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Thanks to the camera man no war has ever been so graphically recorded as this m 

§j one. Ever since the beginning of hostilities in Europe the sharp-shooters of the camera = 

jj brigade have been at the front on the job taking pictures, not only for the leading ■ 

■ governments of the world to file away for future generations, but also for the folks of B 

B today to study when they open their morning paper, favorite magazine or at the movies, m 

I Shooting the day news has become, since the war, a highly skilled occupation requiring |j 

m nerve, courage and skill, yet its work that few of us know much about. ( 



111 

TT WILL be but a few years 
before the present war 
will be discussed in the past 
tense, and for those who did 
not participate in the actual 
fighting there will be need 
for something to tell graph- 
ically the story of the war 
as it was. 

The boys who are there 
now will be classed as vet- 
erans in the future. The 
children of to-day will have 
grown up and be reading 
the history of the greatest 
changes ever recorded in the 
world. If you did not have 
the chance to get into the 
thick of the fray, you must 
have some means to com- 
municate to your children 
the events that are now tak- 
ing place. 

There is not a govern- 
ment of the world that does 
not realize this, and while 
histories innumerable will 
be written, what every na- 
tion is depending upon to 
tell briefly and accurately 
the war history to future 
generations are photographs of the 
battles and the thousand and one 
incidents and activities of the war, 
for by a glance they clearly visu- 
alize a stirring action it would take 
many hundreds of words to de- 
scribe. 

Truly the war has brought the 
golden age of the sharpshooters of 
the camera brigade. 

Uncle Sam fully appreciates 
this, and following the example of 
the governments of Great Britain, 
France and Italy, a complete pic- 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIII 




torial history of our partici- 
pation in the war is now in 
process of manufacture. 

The work has been as- 
signed by the Secretary of 
War to the Signal Corps of 
the army, but the actual re- 
cording of events will be 
done by special units at- 
tached to each division. 
These units will consist of 
one motion picture operator, 
with rank of sergeant, and 
an assistant who must be an 
expert developer, and one 
"still" photographer, who 
may be a sergeant or cor- 
poral, with a developer as 
assistant. 

The pictures taken by 
these men will be carefully 
guarded until they arrive at 
the War Department, where 
an elaborate index system 
will keep record of every 
fact in connection with their 
making. 

To get expert men for 

this work not long ago the 

War Department sent out a 

circular to the photographers 

moving picture operators of 

the nation, asking them to enlist 

their cameras, lenses and services 

in the war. 

While the leading governments 
of the world are getting marvel- 
ously complete pictorial records of 
the war and filing them away for 
the reference and benefit of future 
generations, there is another — a 
civilian — army of camera sharp- 
shooters, who are employed in tak- 
ing thousands of war pictures for 
the benefit of the present genera- 



tion, those who for one reason or another are obliged to 
remain at home. 

These folks must depend upon the daily papers for their 
war news and pictures or upon occasional visits to the 
movies, but they are being well supplied in both directions. 

It is a question if many people, when they open their 
morning paper at a very interesting series of war photo- 
graphs, ever pause to consider how a photographer hap- 
pened to be on the spot to get these wonderful snapshots. 
As a rule, it did not "happen" and was not a "lucky acci- 
dent, ' ' but was carefully planned. 

Nowadays, wherever there is an event of any sort tak- 
ing place of any possible human interest, there will be 
found the news photographer, an active, cool-headed young 
man of astonishing nerve and fearlessness, ready to snap a 
.picture. 

Some of these photographers are attached to the staffs 
of the daily papers, but by far the greater number are em- 
ployed by the various news agencies and syndicates, which 
sell their output to the newspapers, weekly publications 
and monthly magazines throughout the world. 

While it sometimes happens that a rank amateur gets a 
most important news picture which would do credit to the 
reputation of the best professional news photographers, as 
a rule it is the veteran who captures the prize. 

There is probably no branch of news gathering which 
requires greater skill or longer experience for reliable re- 
sults. The modern camera used for the securing of news- 
paper illustrations is really a very complicated instrument, 
requiring weeks and months of use by the operator before 
he can hope for even a reasonably fair percentage of results 
under the very trying and difficult conditions he is obliged 
to work. 

Then, again, there are other things which go toward 
the successful make-up of a news photographer. Courage 
is as necessary as skill, for naturally in taking war pictures 
the operator's work takes him into tight places. On some 
precarious perch, poorly hidden by hasty camouflage, per- 
haps of his own manufacture, he is obliged to dodge shot, 
shell and shrapnel while getting his pictures. 

These once taken, his work is by no means over. Com- 
petition in war photographs, as in all other lines of news 
photography, is keen, and next to getting the picture, speed 
in developing it and then making a train or boat with the 
film, so that it arrives at the home office at the earliest 
possible moment, is the all-important thing. A few hours 
one way or the other may make all the difference in the 
world between a total loss and a handsome sale. 

Not a few civilian picture makers taking pictures under 
.fire have been badly wounded while traveling the battle- 
fields of Europe, and some have been killed; yet others 
have immediately arisen to fill their places, no more dis- 
turbed by the danger than they are by the click of their 
camera shutter. 

Here is the story of a news photographer's experience 
in photographing General Pershing, now in supreme com- 
mand of our forces at the front. 

' ' About three years ago, ' ' he said, ' ' I arrived with my 
camera at El Paso. General Pershing was in command at 



Fort Bliss. That day El Paso was celebrating a holiday, 
and the military men gave a field day in the park. I had 
been grinding out pictures for half an hour when an orderly 
stopped me. 

" 'General Pershing wants to see you,' he said. 

"I didn't realize he had delivered alighted bomb. I 
picked up the fuse, so to speak, and also my camera. 

"General Pershing was sitting in a box with some ladies 
and surrounded by officers. I thought what a fine, soldierly 
picture he would make. Then I noticed the severity of his 
gaze. His first words struck the thought of Pershing as a 
film star entirely out of my mind. 

" 'What do you mean by taking pictures here?' he de- 
manded. 

"Very much embarrassed, I named the officer who had 
allowed me to work. 

" 'I want you to understand that Captain So-and-So has 
no right to authorize you to take pictures at this post. I 
am in command here.' 

"The general's indignant tone upset me so that, under 
the fire of all those official eyes beside him, I didn't know 
which way to look nor what to think. 

" 'I've a good notion to put you out.' 

"His tones cut like a saber, but at least they admitted 
freedom of a sort. I looked at Pershing. In the instant 
his face changed. A genial, good-fellow smile spread from 
lips to eyes. 

" 'Just go ahead and take everything you want,' said 
he, in that tone which has won so many men's hearts; 'and 
if there's anything else you'd like to have — any fancy 
stunts — just call on me, and I will have them done for you.' 

"He was all graciousness. I began by making a pic- 
ture of Pershing and his aides, with their guests. This 
was, perhaps, the last happy picture made of General 
Pershing, for not long after his wife and three daughters 
lost their lives in a fire at the Presidio, California." 

Another class of news camera men who have been work- 
ing in the war zone so that those at home may gain some 
knowledge pictorially of the war are the moving picture 
men, those who take the views for the various pictorials 
and war plays thrown on the screens of our moving picture 
houses. 

Some of these men have set up their cameras in the first 
line of trenches, within fifty yards of the Germans. Such 
work requires the nerve of a veteran soldier, for the Boche 
bullets do not discriminate and are no respecters of non- 
combatants. 

One of these men, with a large staff of expert assistants, 
for several months has been taking pictures in the allied 
trenches and vicinity for a screen play on the war. He 
says that only a motion picture camera, which has ten 
thousand eyes, can see the war. Some of his stars were 
taken to England and France to be filmed amid ruined 
villages and battlefields. Recently he returned to this coun- 
try and had this to say regarding his personal experience: 

"As an American the British and French people ac- 
corded to me every privilege possible. This meant much, 
for the presence of a non-military personage in the trenches 
(Continued in advertising section.) 





GENERAL FILM 

This is not "The 
Price They Paid" 
— it is a scene 
from "The Lone- 
some Road," one 
of the latest O. 
Henry pictures, 
with Frances Parks 
as star. More than 
forty of these stor- 
ies have been 
filmed and are 
justly popular. 



PARAMOUNT-SENNETT 




The success of this latest Mack Sennett 
comedy is due to clever Louise Fazenda 
and her riotous raiment. "Are Wait- 
resses Safe?" We leave it to you. 




"Henry, he's a wonderful child and the image 
of you," were the glad words with which 
mother-in-law establishes herself as a favorite 
with the family in "A Close Resemblance, " 
one of the best of the Drew comedies. 




"The Little Patriot, " baby Marie Osborne star, a Pathe picture, recalls 
Kipling's lines about "The uniform they wore was nuthin' much be- 
fore, " etc. The supporting cast is able, and the little colored boy a 

born comedian. 



HORKHEIMER-MUTUAL 

Jackie Saunders must have starred in 
"Betty Be Good," at the Horkheimer 
studios, before Hooverizing discour- 
aged so costly a necklace for her pet. 



Have you wondered 
where Charles Spencer 
Chaplin attained that 



sylph - like waist line? 

Behold him emulating 

the flying swan ! 




GENERAL 

A scene from "What Transpired after the 

Wind-up" — one of the enjoyable series of 

George Ade's ' ' Fables in Slang. ' ' 





CENTURY 

Alice Howell, in "Neptune's Naughty Daugh- 
ter," goes to a cabaret and is pursued by the 
villain through two far from sober reels. 



Alice Howell already 
has four comedies 
ready for release. 
"Auto-maniacs" is 
the second. 



MUTUAL-STRAND 

The youth and buoyancy of Billie 
Rhodes go a long way in making en- 
joyable those comedies in which she 
appears. Her latest release is "A 
Two-cylinder Courtship." 



-ii - 



Not all, but a large part of 
Paddy McGuire's brains are 
in his feet, and many a 
young man would be willing 





GENERAL 

The O. Henry stories are being 
screened in a manner that will delight 
lovers of that master story teller. — 
Carlton King, in "Little Speck in 
Garnered Fruit." 



VOGUE-MUTUAt 



to be in Paddy's shoes, if it 
meant pulling down the sal- 
ary he does for making them 
misbehave. 



Isn't It One Grand Job That Requires the 




Contrary to the adage, this leop- 
ard will change its spots when 
Clara Kimball Young goes to the 
tropics to film "The Savage 
Woman." 



And that other old saw, 
about clothes making the 
man — isn't this gown 
that Julian Eltinge wears 
in "The Clever Mrs. 
Carfax" proof positive 
that clothes make the 
woman ? 



PARAMOUNT-HARTSOOK 

Kathleen Clifford, star in the first 
Paramount serial, "Who Is Num- 
ber One?" wears jumper and over- 
alls like these. 




HOFFMAN-FOUR8QUARI£ 



One instance of squar- 
ing the circle— Ruth 
Roland, Hoffman- 
Foursquare star, in 
"The Fringe of 
Society." 



The Red Cross of 
Serbia and the 
French Wreath of 
Patriotic Devotion — 
are Mary Garden 
fashions we like. 



Wearing of Working Clothes Like These? 




"The Spring of the Year" is the 
play made from Henry Kitchell 
Webster's story "The Painted 
Scene," in which Bessie Love 
wears this. 



There isn't a harder-working 
player in filmdom than 
Louise Glaum. She's care- 
ful about her clothes and 
scrupulously neat, Louise is. 
And she designs her 
costumes. 



America Divided 



Do You Want It? 



IN this time of unprecedented national peril and 
world peril, do you want America to be one na- 
tion, strong with the strength of unity? Or do 
you want America split with perhaps half a dozen 
sections, weak with the ills and evils of sectionalism? 

This last is no danger born of hysterical dream, 
America has been committed by act of Congress to a 
course leading toward such a disastrous result, and 
this split in national life will begin July 1, 1917 — 
unless the present law be altered. 

Here is the situation : 

Modern nations are bound together not so much 
by the machinery of government as by Ideas. Fun- 
damental ideas held in common by all, fully ex- 
changed so that distantly placed people may under- 
stand and sympathize with each other — these are 
what bring a nation together and what hold it 
together. 

The greatest instrument and medium for the con- 
stant dissemination of these big nation-binding ideas 
is the press— particularly the weekly and monthly 
periodicals. These periodicals have not local or 
sectional bias; they go to all parts of America, and 
serve all parts alike; their great service is in help- 
ing bring all parts close together into one through a 
common understanding. 

These nation-binding periodicals are confronted 

with certain injury and destruction — which means 
loss to you personally, and loss to your country. 
Postal legislation was introduced in the present Rev- 
enue Bill, and is now law, which divides the country 
up into "zones" and increases the average carrying 
charge upon magazines and periodicals about 300 
per cent — as much as 900 per cent for the more re- 
mote sections of the country. This increase varies 
from 50 to 900 per cent. 

This tremendous increase in rates is not necessary 
for the business solvency of the Post Office Depart- 
ment. Last year the Post Office Department earned 
a surplus of nearly $10,000,000. 



This measure is a tax-gathering contrivance. It 

is a tax upon ideas — upon that spreading of ideas 
which hold us together and inspire us as a nation. 
The Post Office was never designed as a tax-gather- 
ing contrivance; it was basically designed to give 
service to the people — to all the people at the same 
rate. The Post Office should not be perverted from 
its noble purpose. 

And any such method of taxation is not necessary 
in order to tax the publishers' profits. The publish- 
ers are not trying to evade taxation. They will 
gladly accept any rate of tax upon their profits that 
may be levied. Most of them have gone on record 
as being willing to turn over to the Government their 
entire net profits for the period of the war. 

This measure, through its "zone" system, will 
have the following disastrous consequences: 

1. It will destroy a large part of the periodicals 
of the country. You will lose the magazines that 
have kept you informed on your country's problems, 
that have helped you in your work. Your children 
will lose the clean publications that have entertained 
and help educate them. And eventually such maga- 
zines as do survive will have to pass their unneces- 
sary increase in cost on to you in case you live at a. 
distance from any publishing center. It amounts to 
this : You are fined because your occupation or your 
preference prevents your living in New York. 

2. Infinitely more serious, this "zone" system will 
result in dividing the country into sections, each de- 
veloping its sectional ideas. The nation will be split 
into an East, a Middle West, a Pacific Coast, a South, 
a Southwest. And this split will be made in the 
world's greatest crisis, when we should be striving 
for union rather than disunion — when North should 
be bound to South and East bound to West by the 
constant flow of ideas — National Ideas. 

This is the time of all times when America must 
be a united America — one nation strong with the 
strength of unity. 

Let your influence be used to that end. 



The Authors' League of America, Inc. 



REX BEACH, President 



GERTRUDE ATHERTON 
ALICE DUER MILLER 
JULIAN STREET 



Executive Committee 

GELETT BURGESS 
HARVEY O'HIGGINS 
LOUIS JOSEPH VANCE 
GEORGE BARR McCUTCHEON 



CHANNING POLLOCK 
LEROY SCOTT 
HELEN S. WOODRUFF 



Write your Congressman and demand the repeal of the iniquitous postal amendment 



No. 2 



The Camera Man in the War 

(Continued from a previous page) 
is usually not welcomed with any de- 
gree of cordiality. A major in the 
British army helped me with my cam- 
era work, and he took me wherever I 
wished to go. In fact, we got so close 
to the enemy at times that I was 
wounded twice by shrapnel, while on 
another occasion I was given a bap- 
tism of mud when a huge shell struck 
a few yards in front of me, killing sev- 
eral men; but it was all in the day's 
work, as there was no other way of 
getting the pictures I wanted." 

While no doubt those taken by our 
own government movie men will in 
time equal them, it is a fact that since 
the outbreak of the war the official 
French photographs have been particu- 
larly good and illustrative. The reason 
for this is to be found in the fact that 
all the operators were expert photog- 
raphers before the war. Now they are 
all enlisted men, who go about their 
work under the direction of their oifi- 
cers as part of their army duty, and, 
like good soldiers, do not consider the 
risking of their lives when necessary. 
As a matter of fact, not a few have been 
killed while at work. When necessary, 
the French movie operators use big 
army automobiles to convey them 
quickly from point to point. Frequently 
the tops of these cars are employed by 
the men to furnish the elevation which 
is often necessary in the taking of good 
photographs. 

In Our Town 

By JAMES G. GABELLE 

Ken Jacques has decided to be a mo- 
tion picture actor. Maxwelton Mac- 
gregor says he has a great aim in life, 
but is too slow on the trigger. 
-f- 

Elmer Smith has also decided to be- 
come an exponent of the shadow art. 
He says it is only right that someone 
bearing the grand old name should be 
represented on the screen. 
-?- 

Deacon Gubsing is reel generous to 
his children. He alius tells 'em if 
they'll be good, he'll take 'em to see 
the pictures of the moving pictures. 
-?- 

Purfessor Fisher says the possum has 
the least brains of any creature on 
earth. Hen Reardon gives it as his 
opinion that the learned purfessor ain't 
never seen a motion picture censor. , 



Nuxated Iron Makes Strong, 

Sturdy, Iron Men and Beautiful, 
Healthy, Rosy-Cheeked Women 



Dr. James Louis Beyea, for fif- 
teen years Adjunct Professor in 
the New York Homeopathic Med- 
ical College, says : 

" Notwithstanding the fact that I am nearing my 
80th birthday, a short course of Nuxated Iron has 
made me feel like a new man. Friends say, ' What 
have you been doing to yourself, you look so well 
and full of life? ' In my opinion there is nothing 
like organic iron— Nuxated Iron — to put strength 
and power into the veins of the weak, run-down, 
infirm or aged." 

Dr. H. B. Vail, Medical Examiner and late of the 
Baltimore and Columbus Hospitals, says, " Time 
and again, I have prescribed organic iron — Nuxated 
Iron — and surprised patients at the rapidity with 
which the weakness and general debility were re- 
placed by a renewed feeling of strength and vital- 
ity. One man 47 years old who had practically 
worn himself out with stimulating medicines and 
nauseous concoctions came to me recently after a 
month's course of Nuxated Iron and declared : 
' Doctor, I feel as full of life and energy as when a 
boy of 21.' When you compare a product like Nux- 
ated Iron which is easily assimilated and does not 
injure the teeth, with the older forms of inorganic 
iron which upset the stomach, ruined the teeth and 
passed through the body without doing any good, 
it is not surprising that millions of people annually 
are now taking Nuxated Iron and physicians every- 
where are prescribing it." 

Former Health Commissioner Wm. R. Kerr, of the 
City of Chicago, says ; " I am well past my three- 
score years and want to say that I believe my own 
great physical activity is due largely to-day to my 




Gee! That there staff (Nuxated Iron) 
acts like magic. It certainly puts 
the ginger into a man. 



personal use of Nuxated Iron, and if'my endorse- 
ment shall induce anaemic, nervous, run-down men 
and women to take Nuxated Iron, and receive the 
wonderful tonic benefits which I have received, I 
shall feel greatly gratified that I have made an ex- 
ception to my life-long rule in recommending it. 
From my own experience with Nuxated Iron I feel 
that it is such a valuable remedy that it should be 
used in every hospital and prescribed by every 
physician in this country." 

Nuxated Iron, recommended above by 
Drs. Beyea and Vail and Former Health 
Commissioner Kerr, is for sale by all good 
druggists on an absolute guarantee of 
success and satisfaction or your money 
refunded. 




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A toilet preparation of merit. 

Helps to eradicate dandruff. 

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Sunny "It" in Reel War 

By WILFRED NORTH 

\ VERY funny incident happened in the taking of the "Greater Vitagraph's" 
military drama, ' ' Soldiers of Chance. ' ' A battle scene was arranged for a 
certain day, and Director Scardon, with his usual executive ability, had everything 
cut and dried; the location was perfect, and the agent was on the job, with several 
hundred extra good supers, for the scene was an important one, where the insur- 
rectoes were making a last desperate attempt to attain the supremacy over the loyal 
troops, and the loyal troops were just as determined they should not attain that end. 

But, alas! the weather was dull and gloomy; so much so, that someone in 
authority dismissed the army of supers. Fifteen minutes later out popped "Old 
Sol, ' ' and in half an hour the day was all that could be desired for good photography. 

Mr. Scardon hurried down from his office, to find that his super army had fled. 
At his wits' end, he ordered his assistant to go down to the docks and dig up as 
many husky Italian longshoremen as he could find and bring them back with him. 
The assistant succeeded admirably in his quest, and there was a likely-looking array 
in the yard for inspection, all decked out in faded overalls and cotton hooks. 

The padrone in charge asked, "Wata disa worka?" "Moving pictures." "Oh, 
da mova da pict! How mucha you pay?" He was told; then followed a lively 
debate in Italian, followed by a swelling chorus of "No, no! Fordy centa hour!" 
The price was finally compromised, they got into the uniforms, and then the fun 
began. 

There is no wonder that General Cardona's men are doing so well at the Italian 
front, judging from the way those Wops entered into the spirit of the thing. In 
fact, there was no holding them ; they fairly ate it up. They went through the 
enemy's line like sunshine through a summer mist. There was no surrender; the 
only way was to knock them on the head. Well, to save the opposing army's life, 
Mr. Scardon very diplomatically divided the Italians and let them fight each other, 
and, believe me, they did in a manner to suit the most exacting. 

In one scene the building of a barricade was required while the camera was in 
motion. The Italians arose to the occasion and began running into the scene with 
bales of hay on their shoulders that would have taken the strength of two ordinary 
supers to lift. 

After several battle scenes Mr. Scardon decided that he would not need all the 
Italians for the rest of the shots and tried to send some of them back to the studio. 
There was an immediate protest, which, when interpreted, simmered down to the 
fact that none would be allowed to go back before the rest, for fear that he would 
pick out the best suit of street clothes that the others had left in the dressing-room. 
This also was arranged to their satisfaction. 

They were just starting to take a scene arranged around an angle of a building, 
and when, from around the other angle of the building, bang, bling, blang, 
blinkety, slam, zowie! The scene stopped, and Mr. Scardon and the others in 
the cast ran around the angle, to find that the Italians had chosen up sides and 
were pulling off a battle scene on their own account and were at it full tilt. They 
were finally pried apart and quiet restored, but not until several very good shots 
were taken of the impromptu scene. 

The upshot was Mr. Scardon declared he had some of the best concerted action 
he ever obtained, which only goes to show that necessity is the mother of invention, 
even in the movies. 

Movie Problems 

"What's puzzling the director now?" 
"Here's the problem — we got a scene at the Pyramids." 
"Well?" 

"Now, would it be cheaper to take 3,000 people to Egypt or build a bunch of 
pyramids outside Los Angeles?" 

Stupendous 

Moving picture director— I tell you I don't want any more of these Jules Vernes 
photoplays beneath the sea. I'm sick of shark fighting and all that. 

Scenario writer — But my play is different; it is full of beautiful swimming 
maidens. I have named it "Twenty Thousand Legs under the Sea." 



Who's Who and Where 



Wheeler Oakman, until recently in 
Universal Bluebird pictures, has joined 
the Metro forces. He will play oppo- 
site Edith Storey. 

«■?- 

Tom Mix will henceforth until fur- 
ther notice belong in the Fox constella- 
tion at Los Angeles. He will have as 
director Edward J. Le Saint. 

-5- 

A. H. Woods, prominent theatrical 

producer of New York, and S. L. Roth- 
apfel, director of the Rialto, were vis- 
itors at the Hollywood studios recently. 

-5- 

They are having a laugh at the Mu- 
tual studios in Chicago because, at the 
time Edna Goodrich was filming Ham- 
ilton Smith's play, "Her Second Hus- 
band," Olive Tell had just completed 
"Her Sister," and Ann Murdock was 
at work on ' ' My Wife. ' ' It looked like 

a family affair. 

-?- 
The sixth picture for the Empire All 

Star Corporation has lately been com- 
pleted under the direction of Dell Hen- 
derson, and the filming of "The Girl 
and the Judge," the Clyde Fitch play 
in which Olive Tell is to star, is now 
in progress. The cast includes a num- 
ber of well-known British players. 
David Powell is Miss Tell's leading 

man. 

-?- 
Pegg^ Hyland's latest pictureplay is 
"The Other Woman," a screen adapta- 
tion of A. H. Wood's stage success. 
The Pathe presentation is supervised 
by Albert Parker, who has worked out 
most successfully some novel ideas in 
light effects. Pathe has lately added to 
its list of stars Fannie Ward, Bessie 
Love, Bryant Washburn and Frank 

Keenan. 

-?- 

"Tom Sawyer, " recently released by 
Paramount, is to be followedeby a sec- 
ond five-reel picture of the later adven- 
tures of Tom and Huckleberry Finn. 
The scenario follows with fidelity this 
boyhood classic of Mark Twain's. Jack 
Pickford said he had the time of his 
screen life while filming these pictures 
in the neighborhood where the events 
really happened, down in Missouri. 

-5- 
Movies on the move has become a 

winter fashion. Following the holi- 
days, Commodore J. Stuart Blackton 
goes to California to film the third of the 
Gilbert Parker novels, "Wild Youth," 
at the Lasky studios. The Empire All 



Star goes to the American Film Com- 
pany's studios in California, to produce 
Mrs. Humphry Ward's famous novel, 
"Lady Rose's Daughter." Clara Kim- 
ball Young goes to the West Indies to 
stage the "Savage Woman." Wallace 
Reid goes to Truckee, Cal., to make 
snow scenes for "Nan of Music Moun- 
tain." 

-?- 
One of the best of the holiday pic- 
ture plays is "The Little Patriot," a 
five-reel comedy-drama, in which Baby 
Marie Osborne, Pathe star, plays the 
lead. Equally enjoyable is "The Lit- 
tlest Scout," the first release of Pauls 
Blackton's Country Life series of pic- 
ture plays. The small son and daugh- 
ter of Director J. Stuart Blackton play 
leads in a picture that is sure to arouse 
to duty all laggards, slackers and stay- 
at-homes, for, of course, its theme is 
the Boy Scouts as home defenders. Spy 
catching and a motor-boat race incident 
thereto are decidedly thrilling. 

Here's a little heart-interest story 
about Warner Oland's " Non-Booze 
Club," which has a membership of 
several hundred already and is growing 
fast. He helps think up new stunts for 
"The Fatal Ring," and in a recent 
"thought expedition" he had for help- 
ers three friends — two civilians and 
one soldier. A soldier may not drink 
any alcoholic beverage while in uni- 
form, so the others, as a comradely 
tribute, decided to abstain for the dura- 
tion of the war. Then and there the 
"Non-Booze Club" started, and it is 
"going strong" with film folks all over 
the country. 



Film Fun 

Magazine of Fun, Judge's Library and 
Sis Hopkins' Own Book Combined. 

No. 346— JANUARY, 1918 



Single Copies, 10 Cents 
Subscription by the Year, $1.00 



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IIIIIIIIIINMIIIIIIIIII' 



Published monthly by 
LESLIE-JUDGE COMPANY, PUBLISHERS 

NEW YORK CITY. 
John A. Sleicher, President. 

Reuben P. Sleicher, Secretary. 
A. E. Rollauer, Treasurer. 

Grant Hamilton, Art Director. 
Jessie Niles Burness, Editor. 
215 Fifth Avenue, New York. 



HHUIUUIIIIIUII 



Copyright, 1918, by Leslie-Judge Company. 
Publisher!. 

Title registered as a trade-mark. 

Entered at the post-office at New York as 
second-class matter. 



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How to Sell Goods in 
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is clearly told by a sales manager of 25 years' expe- 
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collect, etc., in this $2,870,000,000 market. Sent 
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Studio Directory 

For the convenience of our readers 
who may desire the addresses of film 
companies, we give the principal ones 
below. The first is the business office; 
(s) indicates a studio; at times both 
may be at one address. 

American Film Mfg. Co., 6227 Broadway, Chica- 
go, 111. Santa Barbara, Cal. (s). 

Artcraft Pictures Corporation (Mary Pickford, 
Douglas Fairbanks, et al.). 485 Fifth Avenue, 
New York City. Hollywood, Cal. (s). 

Balboa Amusement Producing Co., Long 
Beach, Cal. (s). 

Brenon, Herbert, Prod., 729 Seventh Ave., New 
York City. Hudson Heights, N. J. (s). 

Christie Film Corp., Main and Washington 
Sts., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Cosmofotofilm Co., Candler Building, New 
York City. 

Clara Kimball Young Company, Aeolian Hall, 
New York City. 

Edison, Thomas, Inc., 2820 Decatur Ave., New 
York City. (s). 

Educational Films Corporation, 729 Seventh 
Ave., New York City. 

Empire All Star Corporation, 220 S. State St., 
Chicago, 111. Myrtle Ave., Glendale.L.I.(s). 

Essanay Film Mfg. Co., 1333 Argyle St., Chica- 
go, 111. (s). 

Famous Players - Lasky Film Company, 485 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. 128 W. 56th 
Street, New York Citv. (s). 

Fox Film Corporation, 130 West 46th St., New 
York City. 1401 Western Ave., Los Ange- 
les, Cal. (s). Fort Lee, N.J. (s). 

Gaumont Company, 110 West 40th Street, New 
York City. Flushing, N. Y. (s). Jackson- 
ville, Fla. (s). 

Goldwyn Film Corp., 16 E. 42d St., New York 
City. Fort Lee, N. J. (s). 

General Film Company, 440 Fourth Ave., New 
York City. 

Horsley Studio, Main and Washington, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Kalem Company, S25 West 2Sd St., New York 
City. 251 W. 19th St., New York City. (s). 
1425 Fleming St., Hollywood, Cal. (s). Tal- 
lyrand Ave., Jacksonville, Fla. (s). Glen- 
dale, Cal. (s). 

Keystone Film Co., 1712 Allesandro St., Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Kleine, George, 166 N. State St., Chicago. 

Metro Pictures Corp., 1476 Broadway, New 
York City. Rolfe Photoplay Co. and Colum- 
bia Pictures Corp., S West 61st St., New 
York City. (s). Popular Plays and Players, 
Fort Lee, N. J. (s). Quality Pictures Corp., 
Metro Office. Yorke Film Co., Hollywood, 
Cal. (s). 

Morosco Photoplay Company, 485 Fifth Ave., 
New York City. 201 Occidental Blvd., Los 

Arip-plpg (**3 1 IS) 

Moss, B. S., 729 Seventh Ave., New York City. 

Mayfair Pictures. Corp., 10 Wall St., New York 
City. 515 W. 54th Street, New York City.(s). 

Mutual Film Corp., Consumers Building, Chi- 
cago. 

Paramount Pictures Corporation. 71 W. 2Sd 
St., New York City. 485 Fifth Ave., New 
York City. 

Peralta Plays, Inc., 729 Seventh Ave., New York 
City. Los Angeles, Cal. (s). 

Pathe Exchange, 25 West 45th St., New York 
City. Jersey City, N. J. (s). 

Petrova Pictures, 25 W. 44th St., New York 
City. 807 W. 176th St., New York City. (g). 

Powell, Frank, Production Co., Times Building, 
New York City. 

Rothacker Film Mfg. Co., 1859 Diversey Park- 
way. Chicago, 111. (s). 

Selig Polyscope Co., Garland Bldg., Chicago, 
Western and Irving Park Blvd., Chicago.(s). 
3800 Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. (s). 

Select Pictures Corp., 729 Seventh Ave., New 
York City. 807 East 176th Street. New 
York City, (s). 

Signal Film Corp., 4560 Pasadena Ave., Los An- 
geles, Cal. (s). 

Talmadge, Norma, 729 Seventh Ave., New York 
City. 318 East 48th Street, New York 
City. (s). 

Thanhouser Film Corp., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
(s). Jacksonville, Fla. (s). 

Triangle Company, 1457 Broadway, New York 
City. Culver City, Cal. (s). 

Universal Film Mfg. Co., 1600 Broadway, New 
York Citv. Universal City, Cal. (s). Coy- 
etsville, N. J. (s). 

Vitagraph Company of America, 1600 Broad- 
way, New York City. E. 15th Street and 
Locust Ave.. Brooklyn, N. Y. (s). Holly- 
wood, Cal. (s). 

Vogue Comedy Co.,GowerSt. and Santa Moni- 
ca Bldg., Hollywood, Cal. 

World Film Corp,, 130 West 46th St.,New York 
City. Fort Lee, N. J. (s). 



Uiiimuiiiimiinm it 



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OUR READERS' COLUMN 

This department belongs to the readers 
of Film Fun. Write us and tell us what 
you think about it. If we can help you, 
write and tell us so. If you like our maga- 
zine, tell us about it. If you do not like 
it, tell us anyway. We want to know 
just what you think about it. 



A. E. K,, Terre Haute, Ind.— Yes, 
Viola Dana and Shirley Mason are sis- 
ters. Viola is nineteen and Shirley 
sixteen. 

J. O'D., No. Philadelphia, Pa.— Your 
list of photoplays makes us think you 
must be as busy as we are. We are 
pleased to know that Film Fun is a 
help to you in scenario writing. 

Mrs. M. S. L., No. Irwin, Pa. — Mr. 
Ben Wilson will probably receive mail 
addressed to 2024 No. Canyon Drive, 
Hollywood, Cal. We hope to hold your 
good opinion throughout this new year. 

N. M. Nihoubashi, Tokio, Japan. — 
Miss Grace Darmond was on the stage 
several years before she began her pic- 
ture career with Selig. Her first screen 
play was "Black Orchid." The last, 
so far as we know, is "The Gulf Be- 
tween," a beautiful photoplay in natu- 
ral colors, made by the Technicolor 
Company of Boston. The other stars 
you speak of will appear in Film Fun 
during 1918. 

R. T., Perth, Kan. — Screen stars 
grant many requests for photographs. 
You might write to those you name. 
Mary Pickford's address is Hollywood, 
Cal. Louise Glaum can be reached in 
care of Ince, Culver City, Cal. Helen 
Holmes lives at 4555 Pasadena Avenue, 
Los Angeles, Cal. Norma Talmadge 
is now at work in the studio at 818 
East Forty-eighth Street, New York 
City. 

F. B., Oklahoma. — We like Pearl 
White, too, and would gladly use her 
on our cover page, but for the time 
being we have discontinued photo- 
graphic covers in favor of drawn ones. 
However, we will try to use a nice 
inside picture of her some time soon. 

A. H. R., Chicago, 111.— William 
Russell is with the American Film 
Company, Santa Barbara, Cal. Sessue 
Hayakawa was born in Tokio, Japan, 
He had six years' stage experience in 
Japan before coming to this country. 
Marguerite Courtot has completed a 
picture called "The Natural Law," 
produced by France Films, Inc., Suite 
608, 220 West Forty- second Street, New 
York. Most screen stars are very gen- 
erous about sending out photographs. 
Perhaps she will. 

M. L., Austin, Tex. — George Peri - 
olat was on the speaking stage for 
eighteen years. He made his»camera 
debut in 1909 and has been with Essa- 
nay, Selig and Universal. He can now 
be reached in care of the American 
Film Company, Santa Barbara, Cal. 
Doris Kenyon may be addressed in 
care of the Pathe Exchange. Inc., 25 
West Forty-fifth Street, New York. 




"WALL-NUTS" "GOOD-NIGHT, NURSE' 

By James Montgomery Flags; 




i: ARE MY LIPS ON STRAIGHT ? " 

By James Montgomery Flagg 




Here's a 

Suggestion 

Can you think of a 
better decoration 
than these five jolly 
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Five brilliant paint- 
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Paul Stahr 

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Name 

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Conscious Evolution Kills Old Age 



THERE is nothing more certain than 
that the fountain of youth is in 
each human being, and that each 
human fountain of youth dries up 
just as any other, and all powers of 
body, and personality, recede and disappear, 
through failure to capitalize and properly 
use them. Failure to realize and act on 
these facts and immutable laws causes all 
who die of old age to be broken-hearted men 
and women. For, who can bear lightly and 
without a broken heart to become a victim 
of the nightmare of old age. 

It was not given to humanity to really and 
economically drink to the full of the spirit of 
the fountain of youth, until Conscious Evo- 
lution and its creator blazed the trail which 
led and leads not through tropical jungles or 
over desert wastes to some inaccessible re- 
gion of the universe, but to a proper under- 
standing of our own evolutionary resources, 
and to the means of their cultivation through 
the use of our own powers of evolutionary 
creation. 

The mere fact that we know that billions 
of cells in our bodies must be healthy for us to 
enjoy unusual health gives us poor consolation 
until we realize that it is possible for us to 
consult a benefactor of the human race. This 
man who combines intimate scientific knowl- 
edge of the human cell, as none other, with 
the discovery of the means by which is 
health, life, youth and potency can be mul- 
tiplied; who, by reason of study, experience 
and extraordinary genius shows us how- we 
can put unusual health, youth, and greater 
life in every one of our vast multitude of 
cells, thus giving the human body its maxi- 
mum of health, life and power, is indeed a 
benefactor of the highest type of humanity. 
This man is Alois P. Swoboda. 

A Great Secret of Life 

Alois P. Swoboda shows how without inconven- 
ience, without drugs, without study 01 loss of 
time, we can put unusual life and health in our 
vast multitude of cells and do this in a perfectly 
natural and easy and practical way. This is the 
marvelous secret uncovered in a fascinating little 
booklet written by Swoboda, the pioneer in the 
realm of conscious and scientific self-evolution. 
Some day the complete history of Conscious Evo- 
lution and its creator will be recorded with all of 
its immense significance and ramifications, for 
Conscious Evolution means the highest type of 
freedom, the highest type of liberty, the highest 
type of civilization, the highest type of science, 
the highest type of philosophy, and thus the high- 
est type of consciousness. In this article, however, 
taut a brief outline can be given. 

The story of Swoboda is one of the romances of 
human history. As the discoverer of the origin 
of Conscious Energy— live energy — and the laws 
governing its evolution and of a scientific system for 
applying those laws in a manner that has operated 
successfully in over a quarter of a million instances, 
Swoboda occupies a peculiar niche in earth's Hall 
of Fame. He did not merely write a book, paint 
a great picture, invent some useful device, or win 
some battle. Swoboda's fame is built on a far 
more substantial foundation. He is the wizard of 
the human body — the wizard of the science of 
evolutionary creation— the wizard of the science of 
perpetual youth — the wizard of the science of life. 
He is the apostle of the greater, the successful 
life — perpetual youth. 

Swoboda not only re-creates men and women; 
he makes them rnpre powerful, capable, alive, and 
happy than they were before. Swoboda has revo- 
lutionized the methods of energizing the body 
and mind, and thus has multiplied the powers, 
and life and years of men and women. Swoboda 
advances men and women a tremendous way along 
the line of human development, in the direction of 
a higher creation. The man himself— as well as 



By DONALD RICHARDSON 

his hosts of enthusiastic followers — is a most con- 
vincing example of the effectiveness and substan- 
tiality of his science. 

Conscious Evolution Means 
Evolution Consciously 

Swoboda fairly radiates vitality. His whole 
being pulsates with unusual life and energy. His 
mind is even more alert and active than his body: 
he is tireless. He discourses with learned fluency 
on the sciences of biology, physiology, histology, 
morphology, or on the new and original "with 
himself" science of energy, as well as on the science 
of Conscious Evolution, which embraces the 
principles of all other sciences, entering with equal 
ease and facility on any phase of this all important 
subject. Start him on his particular specialty — 
the development of the human powers, and the 
possibilities of self-evolution— and he pours out a 
veritable flood of illuminating exposition. Earnest 
and vehement, he rises to eloquence as he unfolds 
in his masterful manner the magnificent self-crea- 
tive possibilities of man under the guidance of 
the laws of Conscious Energy. You are impressed 
with the fact that you are in the presence of a 
most remarkable personal it;i — a superior product of 
the conscious system of body and personality 
creating. Swoboda embodies in his own super- 
developed personality the best proof of the cor- 
rectness of his philosophy and science and of the 
success of his Conscious Evolution. 



II 

Swoboda Is Centuries Ahead 
of His Time 

Swoboda has no equal as a scientist, philosopher, 
and psychologist, dealing with conscious evolution. 
Swoboda must not be classed with ordinary biolo- 
gists, psychologists, philosophers, mentalists, phy- 
sicians, faddists, or those whose aim is merely the 
development of the physical. Neither his philos- 
ophy or science is confined to such narrow limits. 
Swoboda's plans comprehend the complete devel- 
opment of the human beine— increase of internal power, 
more body power, more brain power, more evolutionary 
power, more conscious power, more creative power, and 
in fact greater capacity to live, succeed, advance, evolu- 
tionize and enjoy in every way. He is primarily inter- 
ested in those influences which make for a fuller, and 
more complete life— a higher evolutionary scientific self 
creation. 

Swoboda is the kind of a personality that never can be 
satisfied to merely accept a fact without knowing- the 
fundamentals of its existence, the fundamentals of its 
origin and the fundamentals of its ultimate destinv. 
One cannot remain long in the presence of Swoboda with- 
out realizing that he is mentally and physically a super- 
man. He makes you feel that you are only partially well 
and vigorous and ambitious— in short, you are only half 
as alive bodily and mentally as you must be if you wish 
to enjoy to the full the benefits of living— that you are 
living an inferior life. No one can read his booklet with 
out becoming conscious of his wonderful power ami per- 
sonal ity. 



Illllllllllll" 

Youth At Any Age 

Swoboda demonstrates that no matter how old 
we may be, we can through the conscious use of 
the principles of evolution make ourselves full- 
powered dynamos, with every part and wheel, 
and power-belt thoroughly in trim working smooth- 
ly and at maximum capacity — one hundred per 
cent — at any age. If you believe you have devel- 
oped to the highest degree your vitality, energy 
and powers of living and enjoying, you are accord- 
ing to the Swoboda standard demonstrably mis- 
taken. Conscious Evolution can lead you to a new 
and greater realization of health, energy, power, 
life and pleasure. 

IF YOU ARE PAST THE AGE OF THIRTY, 
CONSCIOUS EVOLUTION MUST ESPECIALLY 
APPEAL TO YOU. Conscious Evolution is an 
antidote to old age in its every form and variety 
of conditions. It turns the dial of physiological 
time in the direction of youth, efficiency, vitality 
and greater pleasure. 

When Swoboda attacked the problem of the 
cause and eradication of old age, he directed his 
penetrating mind into the recesses of nature, and 
became conscious of all of the laws and principles 
engaged and involved in the production of living 
organisms, and their evolution and decay. Con- 
scious Evolution is a revelation in perpetual youth. 
It is not enough to say that Swoboda is an author- 
ity on the subject of evolution, youth, growth, 
and ageing. He is the master of the science of 
self-evolution. 



Thousands of men and women between the ages 
of thirty and ninety have been rejuvenated, and 
made again actually young through this evolu- 
tionary science at home, quietly, secretly, easily 
without sell-deception, without faith, without 
make-believe, without pretense, without appli- 
ances and without inconvenience of any character. 
Conscious Evolution will enable human beings to 
live to the age of more than one hundred and be 
as active and alive as at thirty-live to forty-five. 

No one who is energized through Conscious Evo- 
lution can be subject to indigestion, bowel slug- 
gishness, nervous exhaustion, brain lag, sleepless- 
ness, nervousness, old age, weakness and deterior- 
ation, or any functional difficulty of any character. 

Swoboda Has Written a 
Wonderful Booklet 

Swoboda has written a wonderful explana* 
tion of the human body and its evolution. This 
book explains Conscious Evolution and the 
human body as it has never been explained 
before. It explains the Swoboda theory and 
laws of mind and body. It startles, educates, 
and enlightens. It explains as never before 
the reason for the evolution of the mind and 
body. It tells how the cells and their energies 
build the organs and the body, and it tells how 
to organize the cells beyond the point where 
nature left off for you. It will give you a better 
understanding of yourself than you could obtain 
through reading all of the books of science and 
philosophy on the subject of the body and 
mind, because it explains principles that have 
never before been explained by scientists or 
philosophers. It is impossible to duplicate 
elsewhere the information it gives, and the 
value of the information is beyond estimate. 

Swoboda has written a simple, but the first 
really scientific and philosophical, explana- 
tion of the actual evolutionary cause of old 
age. This essiy is a classic. It will stand for 
all time throughout all ages as the first basic 
and real analysis of evolution and ageing 
of the cells of the human body. It explains 
the psychological and evolutionary errors and 
elements involved in the production of ageing. 

Without being compelled to study text-books 
on psychology , philosophy, biology, histology, 
etc., you will, through reading this brief 
analysis learn fully what is nature, when is 
nature not nature, what is the cause of growth, 
maturity, evolution and decay. Swoboda has 
the happy faculty of being able to put a whole 
science in a comparatively few words. This 
essay will interest net only men and women 
who are merely interested in avoiding the 
nightmare of old age, and those who realize 
constantly that they are growing older in 
body, but it will also interest the scientist, the 
philosopher, the psychologist, as well as the 
pure speculator on the subject of life. I predict 
that every man and woman will read this 
work and profit by it. It is the A, B, C, of per- 
petual youth. It will mean astonishment to 
the scientist. It brings confusion to those who 
practice self-deception. It brings embarrass- 
ment to those who believe old age necessary . 
It seems bold, but this is only the effects of 
mis- conceptions concerning the necessity of 
old age. 

The Fountain of Youth — the pursuit of per- 
petual youth— has always been very alluring, 
but here we have a guide to its source. No 
intelligent human being will need coaxing 
to drink of this fountain, for its spirit gives 
life, and arrests decay and destroys the night- 
mare of old age. Perpetual youth will mean 
to the human race more than is the power of 
any human being to estimate. Imagine what 
it will mean to double, triple, or even quad- 
ruple the length of human life and multiply 
human energy. 

You owe yourself a reading of this essay 
on the Swoboda philosophy and science. It 
will put you favorably in touch and in har- 
mony with your creative forces. You will 
harness them, capitalize them, and employ 
them. The result will amaze you. This essay 
which Swoboda has written and copyrighted 
will be sent to you free of charge and free of 
any obligations to Swoboda, if you will write 
for it. Just write your name and address 
on this page, tear it out and mail it to Swoboda, 
or draw a ring around your name on your 
letter-head, or merely send a postal, giving 
your name and address. Do it today. Read 
it, aad learn how to be perpetually young, 
for you cannot afford to grow old. Address 
Alois P. Swoboda, 2088 Berkeley Building, 
New York, N. Y. (A,lrl.) 



FILM FUN 

And The M a s a /. i n e of V u n , Judge's 
Library and Sis Hopkins' Own Book Combined 



V 



Notice to Reader 

When you finish 
reading tliis magazine, 
place a one cent stamp 
alongside of this no- 
tice, handtu any postal 
employee, and it will 
be sent to our soldiers 
audsailors atthefront 



PRICE 10 CENTS 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.00 PER YEAR 

FEBRUARY 



TO 

ST.HELfcj; 



TO- • • i. 




COPYRIGHT, 1919 
BY LESLIk-JUDG£ C0..1HRW YORK 



A MOVING PICTURE 

A fortune awaits the person who films this scene 




JDEDTIME stories over, tumble-time all 
_Z3 through — good-night to Johnnie and Dollie. 

7:30 by the clock. 

"What shall we do? That's it! And it will be 
good because they show Paramount and Artcraft 
pictures. But hurry — we don't want to miss a 
minute of it." 

* * * 

You don't know exactly how it all comes about. 
And what's more you don't care. But before you 
realize it those vexatious big little things that 
were so important at a quarter to six aren't of 
any importance at all. 

You slip out of yourself. And your mind is all 
dressed up in a pinafore or knickerbockers. 
You're headed hot-foot back to the Land-of-Be- 
ginning-Again. The Land where things are what 
they ought to be — the land of Fancy-Free, of 
Youth — the wonderful land of motion pictures. 





You sit there for two hours that tick off faster 
than anything you ever believed possible — ab- 
sorbed and lost in love and adventure, romance 
and fun — feasting your eyes on gorgeous specta- 
cles that whirl you off into strange worlds. 

And you agree that Paramount and Artcraft 
motion pictures are good company to keep as you 
go back to Johnnie and Dollie, wiser in the wis- 
dom of the Land-of-Beginning-Again — with a 
mind even more ready for understanding their 
problems and a surer, closer comradeship with 
these keepers of your hearts. 

* * * 

Of course, you will remember Paramount and 

Artcraft as the better motion pictures — better in 

everything that makes a picture worth while : 

foremost in their stars 

foremost in their direction and mounting 

foremost in their literary and dramatic standards 

And you will remember the theatre, too, where 

you see them. 

(Brkra£t 



Thrpp Wan* in TSnnrf, how to be sure of seeing Paramount 
J. /If te M ayS TO I^JIUZV and Artcraft Motion Pictures 



one 



By seeing: these 
trade-marks or 
names in. the advertise- 
ments of your local the- 
atres. 



/7tf?n Bv seeing- these 
I UULf trade-marks or 
names on the Iront of 
the theatre or in the 
lobby. 



three 



names 
screen 
tre. 



FAMOUS PLAYERS -LASKY CORPORATION 

ADOLPH ZUKORT'ts, JESSE L LASKY :>.v/Vw CECIL B DE MLLtt D'mfjrCj'n-nU 



"FOREMOST STARS, SUPERBLY DIRECTED, IN CLEAN MOTION PICTURES 




By seeing - these 
trade-marks or 
flashed on the 
inside the thea- 



FEB -6 1918 



©CLB408233 




VITAGRAPH 



CORINNE GRIFFITH 



This young star is at work on a patriotic photoplay, written by Robert W. Chambers, to ex- 
pose the spy system and aid in suppressing it. The scenes along the Erie Canal, filmed in 
the worst of the zero weather, entailed such hardship that Miss Griffith is justified in feeling 
that she has been doing her bit heroically. This is her first winter in New York. Her home 
is in the Lone Star State, and Texas is proud of her. 




Film Fun 

EDITORIALS 




An Ark of Safety 

TF ANY fractional part of the deluge of disaster that is 
foretold for the film industry is to arrive on schedule, 
it is urgent that we organize for safety. 

The fifth largest industry in the country has involved in 
its destinies an enormous number of people, but its growth 
has been so rapid that such unessential things as statistics 
have been disregarded. It is estimated that some sixteen 
million people are directly concerned in transportation 
matters, that being second in volume and importance in 
the country's industries, and for present purposes it may 
serve and not be far from the facts to estimate that the 
livelihood of some five million or more people will be 
affected by this flood - if the storm breaks. 

Safety can be assured if this army of film folks is thor- 
oughly organized and goes systematically about getting 
what it wants. Among the things it wants is, first, of 
course, an enrollment which will demonstrate its strength 
and ability. It ought to be possible to form an association 
on such broad lines as will bring into membership all the 
film folks, in >;very branch of the business — men and 
women, producers, distributers, writers, camera men, me- 
chanics and the hosts of craftsmen of one sort and another 
whose prosperity is so important, not alone to this indus- 
try, but to the communities they live in. 

A fund can be created that will be no burden on anyone. 
Scores of thousands of us can manage "a dollar down and 
a dollar a month" almost any time, without serious finan- 
cial embarrassment even in these war times. An organiza- 
tion with five million members, or even half that number, 
paying dues at that rate, would soon become a power for 
good. So many of the boys are in the service that it might 
be well in the beginning to devote our energies and our 
funds to war purposes — along lines similar in a general 
way to the Stage Women's War Relief work. Or it might 
be wise to build a home for film folks to use at need, 
whether the need arises from old age or illness or accident 
or other incapacity. A big, beautiful hotel-and-office build- 
ing, to contain every requirement for members, would prob- 
ably be self-sustaining from the start; but apart from such a 
building and in connection therewith there should be estab- 
lished a hospital and a training school, where the boys who 
come back from the war needy may regain lost ground, 
and where their dependents may be equipped for the big 
battle to win bread without inordinate hardship, for the 
worst of war always follows the cessation of hostilities and 
falls heaviest on the weak. It might be well to plan for 

FILM FUN MACAZINE will he issued the 10th 



twin establishments, one on the east and the other on the 
west coast; for it is a safe guess that the greater part of 
production will always be in California, where the year's 
average of camera days is 312, and the peak of the load of 
distribution will always be carried in New York. 

A membership might carry appropriate privileges, in a 
general way, like the Travel Club confers, or insurance or 
indemnity or an annuity. Also it might be wise to incor- 
porate the tenet of the Rotary Club, "All for each and each 
for all," as a working principle. 

The big idea is the strength and the power for good that 
such an organization will surely develop. Film Fun is 
willing and anxious to do its "two bits" in perfecting such 
an association. What do you think of such a plan? 

Loving Our Enemies 

/"\NLY the Irish seem to understand how this can be, and 
^^ ought to be, done. Everybody else seems to think 
criticism necessarily implies censure and enmity, but not 
so the son of Erin. An amiable altercation is better than 
the breath of life to him. If you yield to his argument 
to-day, by to-morrow he will have shifted ground and will 
hold forth valiantly for the point you conceded. It is a 
good arrangement, when you get used to it. 

This is by way of excuse to some good friends who want 
us to go on record as to the censor. We don't know. We 
wish we did. We're ready to argue the question from any 
angle. Judging by the crying abuses in photoplays, some- 
thing ought to be done; but if their accomplishment to 
date be an indication of the worth of their work, then the 
effectiveness of censors is away below zero. 

The responsibility should be fixed wherever it belongs, 
and transgressions should be punished. The police, it is 
generally understood, are charged with the duty of keeping 
youth out of danger. It might be a solution of the problem 
to enlist the co-operation of the chief of police and get him 
to detail a board of censors from his officers — members to 
be changed weekly or monthly, to insure a fair deal for all — 
and let these experts in public welfare decide what is detri- 
mental in films to the good health and good conscience of 
the community. 

There is no doubt in the world that they would suppress 
much that now gets by. This may not be -the right solu- 
tion, but it is worth consideration. It would surely lessen 
the confusion that now prevails, due to so many attempting 
the same thing, with the result that nothing is done, and 
there's nobody to blame. 

of each month, instead of the 1st as heretofore* 




FLASH BACKS 




AFTER Ella Hall appeared in the Little Orphan, six 
•**• hundred and forty fellows wrote to her, offering to 
adopt her. 

Charlie Ray, announcing the marriage of his sister, 
says she is now an X-ray. Rather clever of Charlie, don't 
you think? 

That sorrowful, pleading expression you so often see in 
Charlie Chaplin's eyes is not acting. He's afraid Eric 
Campbell will fall on him. 

Theda Bara asks $100,000 damages because Major M. 
L. C. Funkhouser, of Chicago, has criticised her attire in 
various plays. So much for so little ! 

"Ralph Ince will direct his wife, Lucille Lee Stewart, 
in her new screen vehicle, "Step by Step." Ya-as, he 
will ! Who ever heard of a man directing his wife ! 

Fannie Ward took a two weeks' vacation to heal an in- 
jured shoulder. Mack Sennett hopes the idea won't spread 
in his camp, where a bruise goes with every laugh. 

Visitors at Chaplin's studio notice in his dressing-room 
a glass case containing many rows of books. They marvel 
that he has time to read them. He don't — they are bank- 
books. 

Mary Pickford plays the two principal characters in 
"Stella Maris. " Fine! We like lots of Mary in her pic- 
tures. None of us would complain if she played all the 
characters ! 

Jack Pickford and Louise Huff's appearance in a love- 
story picture called "The Varmint" has caused a crusty old 
bachelor to say that at last somebody has called Cupid by 
his right name. 

H. C. O'Livin, an "extra" on the Laskey lot, has peti- 
tioned the California Legislature to change his name. He 
claims every time he shows up for work, the other "ex- 
tras" try to mob him. 

You can't keep the airy Douglas Fairbanks down ! He 
asserts that next year will find him flitting in France as a 
flier with the Allies. Not to be outdone, Roscoe Arbuckle 
claims he is going to enlist as a tank ! 

Theda Bara claims to be a reincarnation of Hoo-Sis, 
a daughter of one of the Pharaohs. It looks as though she 
may be able to get away with it, too, because no one can 
prove she isn't. 

Charlie Ray has some cousins who are continually send- 
ing him presents along with their hintful hopes of getting 
into pictures. Charlie says he at last understands the 
meaning of "diplomatic relations." 

Rufus Steele, whose preparedness film, "The Eagle's 

Tell us how you 



Wings," is still running strong, tells us all his ambitions 
are "up in the air." He made a number of flights, and 
now he just hates ground traveling. 

Wallace Reid likes to go duck shooting. We go as far 
as anybody in our faith and admiration, but that yarn of 
his about bagging the limit, and "then that somebody stole 
all of 'em" sounds awfully like a fish story. 

Constance Talmadge is haunted — by the skeleton she 
has lately discovered in California. The ruins of Baby- 
lon, the set in which she worked as the Mountain Girl in 
"Intolerance" a year and a half ago, is still standing. 

Leander Richardjon must have been some peeved when 
he wrote of a "male star of considerable candle-power 
manufactured by the producer's publicity bureau." He 
mentioned no names. Maybe you will know whom he 
meant. 

Mack Sennett has every male moveite in the U. S. rav- 
ing over his bunch of bathing beauties. No wonder the 
population of Los Angeles is increasing ! As for the writer 
of these lines, he would rather be the Pacific Ocean than 
President ! 

Leon Trotzky, now so prominent in Russian politics, 
was at one time a moving picture actor in this country. 
He appeared in "My Official Wife," with Clara Kimball 
Young, and his salary, it is said, was just five dollars a 
day — the days he worked. 

During the big Red Cross drive a woman at Hollywood 
offered $100 to the fund if Douglas Fairbanks would jump 
from the roof of the stand. He did— a distance of twenty 
feet. Five dollars a foot. Doug says he is glad the lady 
didn't offer a thousand dollars. 

Anita Stewart has a contract with Vitagraph calling for 
$1,000 per week salary and a guaranteed royalty of $75,000 
per year. And Anita wishes to break that contract ! It is 
news like this that causes the $8 per week shopgirl to swal- 
low her gum and go into hysterics! 

All the way from Balboa, at Long Beach, Cal., comes 
this suggested amendment to the Hoover schedule: Cheat- 
less Sunday, Treatless Monday, Meatless Tuesday, Wheat- 
less Wednesday, Sweetless Thursday, Heatless Friday (this 
is every day in New York just now) and Eatless Saturday. 
We're in favor of somebody else trying it. 

Clara Kimball Young engaged Norman Selby (Kid Mc- 
Coy) to play the part of the detective in "The House of 
Glass," and it is related that on his return from his first 
day's work, he found that his rooms had been rifled of jew- 
elry, clothing and $200 in money — real, honest-to-goodness 
money. He's sleuthing now on and off the job. 

like this page. 



The Beautiful in Picture Plays 

By PEGGY HYLAND 

JH1I11IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII UIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

I Miss Hyland believes, as FILM FUN believes, that fine, clean plays which fathers and | 

| mothers can enjoy in company with their daughters of any age, will prove as strong from j 

the box-office view point and as popular with the public as those that feature the salacious. j 

That's why we asked her to write this story. The success of her late film plays, " Persuasive 1 

| Peggy" and "The Other Woman," prove our point. Next month Winifred Allen will tell § 

| all about how she bikes working in Florida. j 
liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Pleased with 
her purchas- 
es and the 
fact that 
"Dad" ar- 
rived from 
London in 
time to help 
her go shop- 
ping. 




r>EAUTY is al- 
■*-"* ways refresh- 
ing. With the mem- 
ory of some beauty in our heart, it is easier to 
overcome difficulties and battle discouragement, 
and in this old workaday world the time to search 
for beauty is all too fleeting. Only in the recrea- 
tion hour, knowing the day's labor has been 
completed satisfactorily, may we seek it with an 
easy conscience. 

Realizing this, I come to the point of my little 
chat with you. I found myself longing to pass 
this beauty along to others. When this desire was 
first born, I spent days wondering how I 
might in some way win my purpose. I rea- 
soned it out to myself somewhat like this: 

The artist strives to give us the beauty 
of marine scene. Day after day he sits be- 
fore his canvass, palette and brush in hand, 
making a change here and there, touching 
up the crest of a wave just about to break, 
in order to make the spray more natural. 



He endeavors in every way to convey the pure beauty 
of the scene before him to others. 

The poet sings of the beauty he sees — it may be in the 
woodland. He describes the great solitude of the scene, 
with the only living sound that of the birds' songs pealing 
from among the green of the towering trees; of the flowers 
springing from the soft, brown earth ; the little brook rip- 
pling over the rocky surface. Somehow he makes us feel 
the presence of old Mother Nature herself. 

And then the musician — how he takes us away from the 
workaday world, giving us the glory of the sunset as the 
big ball of fire sets behind the hills, twilight enveloping 
the world — all by drawing his bow caressingly across the 
strings of his violin ! So, in every walk of life, we find 
our fellow-men lending their efforts and talents in bringing 
the beauty they find in their world to others, who might 
perhaps walk past the scene itself unheedingly. 

And it seemed to me that the screen serves as a mirror 
to life itself, reflecting both the desirable and undesirable; 
but apparently the only stories available reflected the sordid 
— not what I wanted to reflect — not the little humorous in- 



"The Other Woman" presents 
the old problem in a new light. 





PEGGY HYLAND, 

As " Persuasive Peggy," doesn't have any difficulty in convincing her audiences that a 
wily woman's winsome ways are all the equipment she requires to insure her victory 

in any engagement. 



^'V 



mmm 




cidents so prevalent in our lives, to which we are blind be- 
cause of their proximity — not the great studio of nature 
and attractive flashes of happy, innocent children and 
romping animals. 

I knew there were such stories galore. I had read many 
of them myself. And then and there was born a deter- 
mination to screen the wholesome topics and shun the sor- 
did and sensational. 

Life itself is a drama — one in which we all play a part 
— and I felt sure that my friends would enjoy the sort of 
entertainment which I had in mind in their recreation 
hours. Human nature is the most attractive thing imag- 
inable, and, therefore, I felt sure a human- interest comedy 
drama with pretty settings would be pleasing. Thus was 
born "Persuasive Peggy," my first offering under the 
Mayfair banner. 

"Persuasive Peggy" is an "honest-to-goodness," true- 
to-life story, showing how a sweet young bride ties her 
blustering boy husband to her chariot wheels in so diplo- 
matic a way that he still believes himself the master. It 
depicts the first year of married life — the hardest one to 
live through without acquiring scars. One by one the 
young wife places the bricks of faith, consideration, co- 
operation and understanding in her little dream house of 
matrimonial happiness. And love, of course, is the corner 
stone. In the end she and her boy husband learn that 
home is where love abides. 

Of course, my pictures must be entertaining as well. 
In every case the story must have an original plot, pretty 
frocks must be in evidence, and pleasing people cast in the 
roles to make the offering attractive. But it need not con- 
tain anything not wholesome and refreshing. The beauti- 
ful in motion Dictures has enormous undeveloped possibil- 



Friend husband is 
learning never to 
be surprised, 
whatever happens. 



ities, and I hope to exhaust 
every one of them before I 
say "die." 

Romance will always be 
present, for it is romance 
that makes life worth while. 
When we do not crave ro- 
mance, we have lost the very 
spirit of the drama of life. 
I And love — love must always 
be portrayed as an ethereal 
and elusive thing, but, nev- 
ertheless, it must always 
be there, for it is love that 
makes the world go round, 
whether it is the love of 
mother, child or sweethearts. 
And so, dear friends, 
these plans are the realiza- 
tion of my dreams. Like the 
artist, poet and musician, I 
purpose in my humble way, through the wonderful medium 
of the screen, to bring to you in your recreation hour all 
the beauty I am able to glean in stories, acting, frocks and 
settings. I hope that many stars may join me in this re- 
bellion against the sordid and sensational in picture plots. 
If we unite in a determination not to appear in bad plays, 
the question of censoring will be settled. And I hope my 
pioneering may furnish box-office demonstration that my 
theory is sound. 



"Jackpots" likes 
to have Peggy 
talk over her 
troubles with 
him. 




Exclusive Fashions of Some of Our Friends 





Lieutenant Haiti ey McVey, 
aviation section U. S. Signal 
Corps, a brother of Mrs. 
Sidney Drew and formerly 
Mr. Drew's secretary is used 
to being "up in the air." 



William Rus- 
sell wanted us 
to have this, 
so we would 
know what a 
real animal 
trainer he is, 
out on his Cal- 
ifornia ranch. 
He's a "regu- 



iiiiwiiiimiiimiiiiiiiini 



? 



mi iiiiiimmmiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiitiHiiinmiiiii 



■ :■■:-.: i i :■ I I :i II I lit I 




Genuine, all wool and yard 
wide, supporting Jackie 
Saunders in "Betty Be 

I* 




Pfffffll 
p., 

Ill 

HORKHEIMER-MUTUAL 



lar fellow," 
Bill is, and a 
mighty clever 
comedian. 
Next time he 
comes to New 
York, we hope 
he will stay 
longer. 



f* 





VI7AGRAPH 

Bill Duncan, in a "Darn It" 
pose, directing in the new 
serial, "Vengeance and the 
Woman." Life isn't all 
sunshine, even in Cali- 
fornia, out on location. 



miiiiiiiiiiiiilMiiiiin inn:: i' mm 



Good." Anybody would 

be, Jackie says, who had 

Mammy's care cooking. 





Baby Marie Osborne, the little Pathe 
star, and Toto, the famous Hippo- 
drome clown, as they appeared at the 
Red Cross benefit recently held in Los 
Angeles. Toto is a screen scream. 



Harold Lockwood, toreador. He had 
a lot of fun and became very popular 
with these pets of the lumber camp in 
the White Mountains, where Metro 
staged "The Avenging Trail." 



SELECT 

Constance Talmadge went to Cali- 
fornia last month to film "The Shut- 
tle." She was having one great day 
going over old trails with Earle Foxe 
. when this was taken. 






Old Friends From the Stage and the 




HERBERT BRENON 

Sir Johnston Forbes-Robert- 
son and Sydney Golden, in 
"The Passing of the Third 
Floor Back," a Herbert 
Brenon production. 



"The Cinderella Man," Mae 
Marsh, srar, awakens the beholder 
to a frame of mind that recog- 
nizes the truth and beauty in 
make-believe. 



ClAR* K VCtlvC 



Mis? Young, in the convent dress she wears in 
"The Marionettes," seems to be having a dis- 
agreement with Director Chautard and her father, 
Edward M. Kimball, but it's all in the picture. 







■ Js8 




BP^k^jssi^* '-sB; 


jf*H 




Emily Stevens, in "Alias Mrs. Jessop," a recent Metro 
success, plays the game of chance. 




PARAMOUNT 



This doesn't look like the foreword to a tragedy, but it is. 
The picture is "Her Sister's Rival," produced by the Rus- 
sian Art Films Corporation. 



In Dorothy Dalton's recent photoplay, "Love Letters," 
occurs this tense moment when the old gardener remem- 
bers who wrought his ruin. 



Five -Foot Shelf of Books Appear in Films 




PARAMOUNT 



Vivian Martin, as Gctavia Basset, "The 

Young Barbarian," is a terrible trial to 

her English small-town relatives. 



PARAMOUNT-BLACK!" ON 

They are all star 
performers in this 
rousing scene, 
which comes near 
the end of J. Stuart 
Blackton's great 
picture, " The 
Judgment House, ' ' 
a film version of a 
Sir Gilbert Parker 
novel, lately 
released. 



Taylor Holmes, in "Uneasy Money," with Virginia 
Valle, is registering devotion. Really a smile of woe, 
for the coffee is cold, but he doesn't know she knows it. 





PARAMOUNT 



Ethel Barrymore, in "An American Widow," is a reve- 
lation. Her most ardent admirers were not prepared to 
see her in a comedy role — that of a dashing young 
widow, with definite ideas as to her requirements for a 
second husband, working confusion to all who oppose her. 



Dainty, clever little people — these that appear with 
Marguerite Clark in "The Seven Swans." This shows 
how happy they all were before the wicked spell was 
laid upon her little brothers. Wouldn't you weave 
nettle garments to win them back? 



How to Help 

*••*•*****••••***• 



Make the Third Liberty 
Loan the Victory Loan 

rPHE TWO Liberty Loan 
campaigns have demon- 
strated the willingness of film 
folks to reach down into their 
pockets and lend their dollars 
to the government. Further- 
more, they have all displayed 
an eagerness to aid in dislodg- 
ing dollars from reluctant or 
hesitant pockets. Fairbanks's 
whirlwind trip from Holly- 
wood to New York and return 
swelled the total by more than 
a million. Marguerite Clark 
worked so willingly and well 
that the Cincinnati Chamber 
of Commerce credited her 
with upward of four million. 
Every one of the screen stars 
came right to the center with- 
out waiting to be asked. 

The third Liberty Loan 
will be floated the first of 
March. It will undoubtedly 
exceed in amount any single 
war loan or any other loan 
ever offered in the history of 
the world. No loan of such 
proportions can be success- 
fully absorbed unless the en- 
tire nation responds to the 
offerings, and every citizen 
practices of self-denial, that 
he may subscribe to the limit 
of his ability. We have 
pledged the honor of our coun- 
try and our people to fight this 
war to our last dollar and our 
last man, if necessary. Amer- 
ica does not break her word. 
The key to the situation rests 
in the hand of the average 
man, woman and child in 
every State in the Union. 

This is a preparedness 
story, to the end that every 
one of you who hasn't already 
bought Liberty Bonds may be 
in readiness to get quick ac- 
tion when this loan is offered. 
Every one of us who has al- 
ready bought should buy more. 




Raymond 

Hitchcock 

in the 



Eyes For Our Navy 

npHE NAVY is in urgent need of binoculars, spyglasses 
and telescopes. An appeal made several weeks ago 
resulted in the receipt of over 3,000 glasses of various 
kinds. Many thousands more are needed. 

All articles should be securely tagged, giving the 
name and address of the donor, and forwarded by mail 
or express to the Honorable Franklin D. Roosevelt, As- 
sistant Secretary of the Navy, care of Naval Observa- 
tory, Washington, D. C, so that they may be acknowl- 
edged by him. Articles not suitable will be returned 
to the sender. Those accepted will be keyed, so that 
the name and address of the donor will be permanently 
recorded at the Navy Department. Every effort will 
be made to return them, with added historic interest, at 
the termination of the war. It is, of course, impossible 
to guarantee them against damage or loss. 

As the government cannot, under the law, accept 
services or material without making some payment 
therefor, one dollar will be paid for each article ac- 
cepted, which sum will constitute the rental price, or, in 
the event of loss, the purchase price, of such article. 

************************ 



Uncle Sam 

****************** 



Do Your Bit 

on the farm 

T OUIS KON, Commissioner 
of Immigration and Col- 
onization for the Province of 
Manitoba, has been engaged 
recently in Chicago in the 
production of a film for which 
he drafted the story, showing 
how Canada, and particularly 
Manitoba, went about solving 
the labor-shortage problem at 
harvest time. 

"Do Your Bit on the 
Farm" is a thousand - foot 
reel, partly produced in Win- 
nipeg and partly in the Roth- 
acker studio, Chicago, appeal- 
ing to city people to spend 
their vacations on farms. In 
Winnipeg, last year, one of the 
large department stores had a 
Girls' Brigade, composed of 
young women clerks who vol- 
unteered to go into the harvest 
fields from 4:30 p. m. until 
dark every day during the 
harvesting season and help 
stook grain. They worked 
in their jeans, like soldiers, 
and had a good time be- 
sides. 

Mr. Kon relates one inci- 
dent to prove his assertion 
that women make better farm- 
hands than men. He says a 
tall, strong Icelander girl 
walked into his office one day 
and demanded a real job as a 
farmhand. She didn't want 
any housework — let the men 
do that ; she wanted to go out 
into the fields, pitch hay, 
stook the grain, and otherwise 
take a man's job. She said 
she knew how, so when the 
deputy minister of agriculture 
wanted a farmhand, Mr. Kon 
recommended the young wom- 
an. She got the place and 
liked it, and the deputy min- 
ister relates that she was by 
all odds the best workman he 
ever had. 



Liberty 
Loan 
film. 



Comments of a Free Lance 



By LINDA A. GRIFFITH (MRS. DAVID W. GRIFFITH) 



The writer is well known in the moving picture world. She began her career as a mov- 
ing picture actress with the Biograph Company when it was the pioneer in this field of 
operation. She has since been prominently connected with the Kinemacolor and other 
companies and more recently was the star in her striking sociological play "Charity." 




CAMPBELL STUDIOS 

LINDA A. GRIFFITH 



A REVIEW OF 
THE RIALTO 
\ HSITORS often 
v wonder what 
particular part Of the 
program brings the 
crowds to the Rialto. 
Glancing over a re- 
cent program, I no- 
tice: First, the 
overture, selections 
from "Aida" by the 
orchestra. No criti- 
cism except the most 
flattering could be 
offered on the work 
of this splendid or- 
chestra. Second, 
came the Rialto Ani- 
mated Magazine, 
which included 
striking scenes of 
the advance of the French troops at the Aisne Canal, tanks 
going into action, followed by an infantry charge. The 
audience viewed these pictures with keen interest. Third, 
singing by the Rialto male quartet. Fourth, "Venice, the 
beautiful." At a time when the world is hushed with fear 
and awe lest Venice fall into the hands of the Hun, these 
scenes of its beauty certainly made a striking appeal. 
Fifth, came the feature picture — the part of the program 
which cannot be said to hold up to the high standard of 
the rest of the entertainment. This particular week the 
feature happened to be Lina Cavalieri in "The Eternal 
Temptress." 

THE UNCONVINCING TEMPTRESS 
Temptresses are so unconvincing, so old-timey and so 
stupid that I cannot get up any enthusiasm for them. But 
as long as the producers insist upon serving us these opera 
singers and one-time beauties under the "star" plan, one 
can only be patient and suffer in silence. When we have 
had them all, perhaps we can have some nice, good, whole- 
some movies once more. 

The story of "The Eternal Temptress" is stupid and 
tedious. Lina Cavalieri is no actress. As far as screen 
beauty is concerned, I saw nothing to rave over excepting 
one lace gown and a wonderful chinchilla coat. Cavalieri 
also wore an ermine coat, but as ermine is a part — and a 



very ordinary part — of nearly every movie actress's ward- 
robe, no comment is necessary on that. After this bore- 
some feature, more good music, and then, like a refreshing 
shower at the end of a humid August day, came Mr. and 
Mrs. Sidney Drew in one of their delightful comedies, 
' ' Wages No Object. ' ' After suffering through five reels of 
impossible stuff like "The Eternal Temptress," believe me, 
the Drews call forth earnest and heartfelt thanksgiving. 
They themselves are, first of all, "human beings." They 
act like human beings. Their little photoplays, whether 
original with them or scenarioized from stories, are always 
clean, wholesome and interesting. 

LOVE FOR THE SPICY 
A mad city like New York is no doubt supposed to have 
many temptresses. They always, at least according to the 
movies, settle in a metropolis to do their dirty work. Per- 
haps that is why, being so fed up on "temptresses" by the 
movies, we inhabitants of a wicked metropolis crave the 
simple and natural. I understand that out in the small 
towns of the middle West Olga Petrova is very popular, 
because she seldom if ever portrays a virtuous woman. I 
presume Lina may become a favorite out there as well as 
Olga. The long winter nights out on the lonely plains give 
one much time for reading. Those who have never left 
their small com- -^ 

munities have no 
doubt read much of 
the beautiful Cav- 
alieri. But here 
in New York City, 
where so many of 
us are supposed 
to be more or less 
sirenish, we cannot 
be expected to take 




Lina Cavalieri wears wonderful gowns in "The 
Eternal Temptress." 



alluring, vamping temptresses seriously. To realize how 
childish this "Eternal Temptress" photoplay is, all one 
needs to do is to visualize it as spoken drama. Wouldn't 
it be funny ? 

A GREAT NOVEL ON THE SCREEN 

It is no easy matter to take a novel of the length of 
"Les Miserables, " with its plots and counterplots, contain- 
ing such an endless wealth of material, and make a clean- 
cut adaptation, as Frank Lloyd has made of Victor Hugo's 
epic. For his adaptation, as well as for his fine direction, 
he deserves great credit. This photoplay version of "Les 
Miserables" is one of the very best ever made from a 
classic. There have been numberless classics rendered 
into movie form. Some of them have been so distorted in 
the process as to make one 
weep and gnash one's teeth. 
Shades of Sir Gilbert Park- 
er's "Right of Way" rise 
before me ! Given, first, a 
magnificent story out of 
which a splendid scenario is 
constructed, given good di- 
rection, photography and 
acting, the result can only 
be a perfect production, such 
as is this one of "Les Mis- 
erables. ' ' Why is there only 
one William Farnum? The 
ranks of the movie actors 
can make room for so many 
more! One feels so com- 
fortable seeing a real man 
like Mr. Farnum on the 
screen, an actor who looks 
like a man and acts like one. 
His work throughout the 
picture sustained an even 
note; his characterization of 
both the uncouth criminal 
Jean and, later, the softened, 
kindly Monsieur Madelene 
is of the same high grade. 
There is only one criticism 

— that is as to make-up. Why does an artist like Mr. 
Farnum wear a wig of thick, straight hair in the prison 
scenes, when his hair is so irrepressibly curly? If, as I 
suppose, it was meant to denote the cropped head of the 
convict, why not a wig with closely cut hair? 

The entire cast was an exceptional one. Hardee Kirk- 
land as Javert ran a close second to Mr. Farnum. He was 
Hugo's creation come to life. I liked his characterization, 
his work and his make-up, all but the bunch of thick black 
whiskers in the center of each cheek. Sonia Markova as 
Fantine was sweet and appealing. I understand she is to 
be a future Fox star. This is well, for, besides looks, she 
has intelligence and personality. Kittens Reichert as the 
child Cosette was very winsome, and in her scenes with 
Mr. Farnum brought many a tear. Particularly touching 




and beautiful were their scenes by the spring where they 
first meet and when they leave the Thernardier's. Val- 
jean, with Cosette in one arm and the huge doll he has 
purchased for her in the other, presented one of the most 
exquisite pictures ever seen on a screen. Jewel Carmen as 
Cosette grown up was beautiful and quaint in her old- 
fashioned clothes, but her very pretty blond hair did not 
correspond to the dark hair she had as a child. Harry 
Springier as Marius, Dorothy Bernard as Eponine, Anthony 
Phillips as Gavroche, and the Thernardiers as played by 
Edward Ellis and Mina Ross deserve more than a group 
mention. Each one gave an intelligent interpretation of 
the respective parts. The sets were true to the period, and 
many of them beautiful. The scenes of the revolution 
were very well handled. Why does the orchestra continue to 

ring church bells after the 
church bells have stopped 
ringing and been flashed 
off the screen and the vil- 
lagers in the public square 
have turned from their devo- 
tions to merrymaking? 

THE MOVING PICTURE 
MOVES 
Lust for filthy lucre has 
always led the moving pic- 
ture manager along the 
primrose path of dalliance 
with the sensuous and the 
sensual. There is more than 
one public for the movies. 
There is, generally speaking, 
only one public for the spo- 
ken drama. The movies can 
bring to their theaters all 
publics, even those that only 
portray the $2.00 a seat spo- 
ken drama, if they felt there 
was a movie worth spending 
two dollars on. But how 



William Farnum has never done better work than 

in this pretty scene between Jean Valjean and 

Cossette. 



many are? How many are 



even worth fifty cents? 

There is a big class of really 
intelligent people who would like to attend the movies, 
but they want to see something that will not insult their 
intelligence. The time must come, if the movie is to 
occupy the high estate that by its infinite possibilities it 
can so easily fill, when it must consist of something more 
than spectacular effects, expensive settings, battle scenes 
and a flimsy story to exploit a star, whether she be a dis- 
gusting, nude vampire or a brainless, curly-headed doll. 
The public wants plays with ideas, plays with human in- 
terest, plays that have suspense; but, first, last and always, 
the need is for stories with ideas. An experience a clever 
scenario writer once had with Mr. Fox will point one rea- 
son why stories are of such poor quality. This person 
wrote to Mr. Fox, saying he had a scenario he thought 
might interest him, to which Mr. Fox replied that he had 



all the scenarios he needed for a year. At this time an 
opportunity presented itself for this same writer to speak 
of this to three Fox directors, and each one of them was 
desperately in need of a story. When the movies bring 
forth men in their branch of art who will have the same 
perception and artistry as Joseph Conrad and Will Leving- 
ton Comfort have in their line, then we may say that the 
industry is holding its own. But from the present look of 
things, that day seems a long ways off. * 

WHO PAYS FOR MOVIE COSTUMES? 

The alarming threat that movie stars would have to go 
gownless, because of a strike by the garment workers, 
brought me an inquiry as to who paid for the dresses that 
moving picture actresses wear. In my old Biograph days, 
when pictures first began to make an impression, an actress 
was often engaged for a part if she had an evening gown 
of her own. I recall this particularly in regard to Jeanne 
MacPherson, now the author of scenarios in which Ger- 
aldine Farrar appears ("Joan the Woman" and "The 
Woman God Forgot" to her credit), for she played regu- 
larly in ballroom scenes in that day long ago, in the old 
East Fourteenth Street studio, merely because she possessed 
a pale blue evening frock. And I recall one young man 
who always could get a day's work because he possessed a 
good-looking tan overcoat. One could be "atmosphere" in 
those good old days and earn "five bucks per" if one pos- 
sessed good-looking raiment. At that time the principals 
had to have real acting ability. Mary Pickford was called 
upon to try to portray Glory Quayle, in Hall Caine's "The 
Christian," and to be something besides mere "type," 
which is about all that is asked of any actress these days. 

If you are neither a "vamp" nor a "Fox baby doll," 
where do you come in, anyhow, in the movies? As to ward- 
robe, I purchased the first wardrobe of which the Biograph 
was the proud possessor, at a little secondhand shop on Sixth 
Avenue, New York. This wardrobe was of much help, 
especially to the "principals," although occasionally an 
"extra" who had a place of prominence in an ensemble 
scene would be loaned an outfit from it. As no "princi- 
pals" were getting over twenty-five dollars a week then, 
they could hardly be expected, out of that meager salary, 
to furnish elaborate gowns. The first Biograph picture 
that was really well dressed was one called "Over the 
Telephone." In this picture Mary Pickford played a child 
of wealthy parents, and as she had no wardrobe with 
which to dress the part and nothing in the stock wardrobe 
sufficed, Mr. Griffith, the manager, gave me twenty-five 
dollars to buy an outfit for her. That was "going some" 
in those days, and there was much comment in the studio 
over such gorgeous apparel as this twenty-five dollars 
purchased. Four years from that time, as a member of 
the Klaw and Erlanger-Biograph Company, I wasn't a bit 
perturbed over being given four hundred dollars with 
which to purchase two or three gowns to wear in a five-reel 
feature. Whatever an actress purchased for a picture 
in the way of clothes went into her special wardrobe. 
Sometimes, when a particular frock appealed very strongly, 
she would buy it back from the firm for her personal use 



and charge a small rental for wear and tear during the 
taking of a picture. Actresses were always willing to fill 
in from their own personal wardrobe when a part required 
numberless changes of clothes. 

DRESSING AN ACTRESS 
In the old days, when actresses in the legitimate drama 
were not seeking stellar positions in the movies, and 
salaries for stock leading women were one hundred and 
fifty to two hundred dollars a week, clothes were willingly 
paid for by the managers; but as time went on, the thrifty 
ones, finding a plethora of those who sought work in 
motion pictures, began to do what they have always done — 
put as much of the burden on the public as the public 
would bear. It gradually became the custom for actresses 
to furnish their gowns. Managers know the actress's 
vanity and that not one will appear in a gown not the 
most becoming she could afford, and often more than she 
could afford. Proper dressing is a vital part of a movie 
actress's work. She will run into debt if need be to be 
well gowned. The movies follow the legitimate more 
closely in the matter of furnishing clothes. Few theatrical 
firms furnish wardrobe, except for the chorus of musical 
comedies. What, then, is the small-part actress on a small 
salary to do when shoes alone cost eighteen dollars per 
pair? I ask you, Mr. Hoover or Mr. Shoever ! 

FAKERS OF THE MOVIES 

• 

An inventor of motion picture submarine photography 
has sued the Universal Film Company for a larger com« 
pensation than he received for producing under-water fights 
with sharks, devilfish and submarines. In the course of 
the trial in the courtroom, J. Ernest Williamson, the in- 
ventor, described how these fights took place, the making 
of the octopus, the blowing up of the yacht and the con- 
struction of the imitation submarine. Because of his rev- 
elations, the movies have been criticised as ' ' fakes. ' ' Did 
anyone imagine who saw Jules Verne's adventures por- 
trayed on the screen that actors had really dived to the 
depths of the ocean with knives in their teeth to grapple 
with a real, live octopus? One of the Williamson boys did 
a wonderful fight with a shark in their first undersea pic- 
ture, and there was no fake about it; but the devilfish is 
another kind of a "critter." The submarine or under- 
water photography is a wonderful thing. The construction 
of an enormous octopus or imitation of one, with its six 
arms (it makes no difference that there should have been 
eight) cleverly manipulated by six men while it was really 
at the ocean's depths, was in itself a mighty clever piece 
of work. This octopus apparently was engaged in a death 
struggle with the adventurous intruder upon its domain. 
There was a submarine in the picture, also cleverly con- 
structed of canvas and other non-sinkable material, which, 
on the film, looked for all the world like a submarine. The 
devilfish did also, and aided in giving a performance on 
the verge of realistic. This isn't "faking." It is "cam- 
ouflage" — the threadbare word whose use every good writer 
now seeks to avoid. I do not know any of the merits of 
the lawsuit but whatever is paid would be a good deal less, 
than I would do the trick for. 




HEDDA NOVA, 

Russian actress, who is to star in special Vitagraph productions, opened those eyes in Odessa 
not many years ago. She came to America in 1915 to fill a vaudeville engagement, but the 
screen folks saw and claimed her. Her first appearance was in " Light of Dusk. " Later she 
played in "The Barrier" and "The Bar Sinister." 



Broncho Billy "Gentles" His New Steed 






i^Sfoi 






ii»>J 


rS^? is? ^ 


"ife 


^P 


^J^^P" ^S **^->c 




vVfy|pl 


* rr // 





1. Broncho Billy— I'll take that 

there one. Ship it to my ranch 

to-morrow. 



2. Yes, stranger, I see how she 
works. 



3. Whoopee! 




4. Jump, ye cloud-duster, jump ! Ye 
can't make me 



5. Pull leather! 



6. ! ! ! ! ! ! 




7. Chauffeur — Say, have a 

heart ! What are you trying to 

do? Kill that little car? 



8. The poor thing ! Why, 

you had your emergency 

on ! Watch me ! 



9. Broncho Billy — The way he -starts, 

I believe that fellow ain't a-comin' 

back. 




GENERAL FILM 

Bernard S i e g < 
plays leading par 
in many of the ( 
Henry picture 
As Old Behrmai 
the painter i 
"The Last Leaf, 
he makes up lil 
this and does son 
of the clevere 
work he has ev 
done. 



GOLDWYN 



Isabel Berwin has probably "moth- 
ered" more stars than any other 
mother in the movies. She is made 
up as mother to Mae Marsh in "Sun- 
shine Alley" in the picture on the 
left. On the right is the snowy-haired 
young grand dame as she really is. 



Dick Barthelmess, his 
good looks camouflaged 
by bone-rimmed glass- 
es, a feline mustache 
and bandages designed 
after the best hospital 
models, as "Dickey," 
the brother of the "al- 
most bride" in Gold- 
wyn's "Nearly Mar- 
ried," bears a sort of 
family resemblance to 
the portrait. 





The twin pictures 
are Joe Welsh and 
A. Lloyd Lack, the 
latter called upon 
to substitute for 
Welsh, suddenly- 
incapacitated when 
the picture, "The 
Peddler, "filmed by 
the U. S. Amuse- 
ment Company, 
was about half fin- 
ished. Does the 
man in the circle 
look lak — I mean 
Lack looks — oh, 
what's in a name, 
anyhow? 





PARAMOUNT 



Elizabeth Risdon, star in 
George Loane Tucker's feature, 
' ' Mother, ' ' makes up and plays 
a part that suits this gay 
little star to perfection. 



America's Sweetheart has recently 
"put one over" on her admirers 
in "Stella Maris," a late release, 
in which she plays two parts. You 
do not quite see the likeness, do 
you, of the maid with the market 
basket to "our" Mary Pickford, 
who posed for both pictures? 








OLDWYN 

VTIONAL ^^^ <T 




McCLURE PICTURE*. 





GENERAL FILM 

Bernard S i e g e 1 
plays leading parts 
in many of the 0. 
Henry pictures. 
As Old Behrman,, 
the painter in 
"The Last Leaf," 
he makes up like 
this and does some 
of the cleverest 
work he has ever 
done. 



GENERAL FILM 



PARAMOUNT 





GOLOWYN 

Isabel Berwin has probably "moth- 
ered" more stars than any other 
mother in the movies. She is made 
up as mother to Mae Marsh in "Sun- 
shine Alley" in the picture on the 
left. On the right is the snowy-haired 
young grand dame as she really is. 




It might be said of 
these two pictures 
of Wynne Hope Al- 
len that she posed 
as her own mother. 
If coming events 
cast so lovely a 
shadow before, she 
can welcome what 
most women dread 
— life's afternoon. 



Dick Barthelmess, his 
good looks camouflaged 
by bone-rimmed glass- 
es, a feline mustache 
and bandages designed 
after the best hospital 
models, as "Dickey," 
the brother of the "al- 
most bride" in Gold- 
wyn's "Nearly Mar- 
ried," bears a sort of 
family resemblance to 
*he portrait. 







Theda Bara, in one of the beautiful 
gowns she wears in "Du Barry." 



Can you seem to see Norma Talmadge in 

this dancing girl's frock of orange chiffon 

over white satin, with spangles girdle? 

She wears it in "Ghosts of Yesterday." 



Nevertheless, Virginia Pearson is a living 
proof that the new fashions are more be- 
coming than anything the old times pro- 
duced, when a real artist appears in them. 




LOUISE HUFF 

Doesn't often get a chance to appear in fluffy ruffles and furbelows like these. She can 

perfectly well afford them, and you can see that she surely knows how to select and design 

what is becoming, but being pals with Jack Pickford, as she is in "Jack and Jill," compels 

her to lead an active, alert life and to dress the part appropriately. 




PHOTOS AMERICAN 



"Praying hands," yes, surely, if it be true, as Mary Miles Minter believes, that willing, efficient work is the 

sort of prayer that brings the greatest blessings. 

Mary Miles Minter and Her Hands 

THEY DENOTE A WELL-BALANCED AND CAPABLE 
PERSONALITY AND A WONDERFUL CAREER 



<<A/fY HANDS?" 

Mary Miles Minter gazed somewhat ruefully at her 
sturdy little digits and then at her visitor. 

"Hands? Now, who could expect me to have good- 
looking hands when there is so much to do with them? 
There's my knitting and my gardening and my cooking and 
to find recipes to conserve food — and — and — my car — and 
everything." 

The idea was to get a story of the famous little Ameri- 
can Film Company star's hands. The caller had gone pur- 
posely to the Santa Barbara studio to get the story. A sort 
■of a white, slender, fragile and beautiful affair, it was 
expected to be. And to tell the absolute truth, the 
famous Minter hands turned out to be capable, efficient 
little hands that looked remarkably — just then — like a little 
boy's fist just after he had been climbing a tree. 

Here was a good story all gone to smash. 

Miss Minter wasn't half so worried over the happy-go- 
lucky condition of those little hands, that have brought so 
much joy and happiness to everybody with whom she comes 
in contact, as she was at the disappointment of the caller, 
who tried hard not to show it. It wasn't polite, anyway, 
to look disappointed because a famous screen actress did 
not possess white, slender, fragile, lily-like hands. 

"If you want a story of a beautiful hand, just come 
over and look at my sister Margaret's hands," said this 
generous little sister, dragging her caller over to where 
Margaret sat with a bit 'of dainty lace mending in her 
white fingers. Margaret's hands are beautiful — true. 
They are the very white, slender — and all the rest — that 
the caller had hoped to find in Mary's paws. But the story 
must be about Mary's hands, and not about her sister's — 
beautiful hands though the latter might be. Mary was re- 
hearsing "The Mate of the Sally Ann" at the time and 
■was clad in the queer little shapeless middy and one wide 
trouser leg that she wore as the mate on that ill-fated boat, 
the Sally Ann. She tossed her tawny mane back over her 
slender shoulders and sat down confidentially, not at all 



unhappy because her hands were strong and capable rather 
than beautiful and useless. 

"You know, Bernhardt Wall made a cast of Margaret's 
hand one day," she said, "and I was only a baby then, and 
I cried like sixty because I wanted to have my tiny paw 
taken, too. I suppose I must have made considerable fuss 
about it, for Mr. Wall indulgently took a cast of my hand 
— just sort of half open and not a bit graceful and artistic 
like sister's. You know, sister Margaret has always been 
noted for her beautiful hands — and yet she does a lot of 
work with them, too. Just look at the beautiful Jace. " 

And there is a story connected with that baby cast of 

(Continued in advertising section.) 




"Teddy is a willing worker; he deserves the very 

best I can do for him, so I have arranged for him 

to invest his earnings in a Liberty Bond," says 

Mistress Minter. 



Stars no movie fan forgets 

Share the limelight with their pets. 




UNIVERSAL 

Beatriz Michelena features 
Dashing, dauntless, equine creatures 



Bayne and Bushman run their coursec 
On a pair of splendid horses. 



Looking Back 

In which the veteran of 1H1T makes a few 
remarks to the screen idol of 1967 

UAH, THOSE were the happy days, 

■*"*■ my lad!" sajd the old man, 

bent and gray ; ' ' when I was a star of 




Jack (Francis Carpenter) could 
never have climbed the beanstalk 
and overcome the giant had he not 
first conferred with his faithful 
friend. 

the screen — by far the brightest one of 
my day! You're the popular idol of 
the screen, the fans to-day declare. 
Though it may be true, I'm a-telling 
you there's something wrong some- 
where ! 

"You seem to have all your eyes 
and ears, and all of your limbs, I ween 
and it proves a lot that the days are not like those of 'sev- 
enteen. Twenty-six hours some days we worked in those 
dear old days, b'jing! By borrowing two from to-mor- 
row, you can see how we fixed the thing ! 

"Those were the days of the stunt, my lad, when 
every leading man was strong as a bull, at the same time 
full of the tricks of the monkey clan ! We had to work like 
a stevedore, with the grace of an acrobat; combining the 
grit of a bear to fit with the quickness of a cat ! 

"The people wanted those things, my lad — the stunts 
that I used to do ! I could use a gun ; I could leap and 
run like a blooming kangaroo ! 

"One of my eyes is a glass one, lad; the original glim 
one [noon I left on a tree on my way down, gee ! when I 
jumped from a gas balloon! 'How did I lose my arm?' 
you ask? Oh, that is a simple tale ! While shooting a 
scene in the ocean green it was chewed by a playful whale ! 

"Those fearsome scars on my map, my lad, came on 
when some dynamite went off with a roar a minute before 
it honestly had a right! Bound to the rail in the engine's 
path, some guy misunderstood his orders to stop; that is 
why I hop about on a leg of wood ! 

"We leading men gave them thrills, you bet, but still 
it was rough on us! I'm the only lead that's alive, indeed, 
for I was a tough young cuss ! 




CHRI8TIE 

Actions speak louder than barks, 

which was one of the reasons why 

Betty Compson's pet consented to 

appear in motion pictures. 



Miriam Cooper and a co-worker 
waiting to be called for a scene. 
The dog star has come to stay in 
the motion picture firmament, 
and every well-regulated studio 
now boasts at least one canine 
player. They are developing 
more and more talent before the 
camera, many of them taking 
important parts in photoplays. 
They have not yet reached the 
point of demanding exorbitant 
salaries, some of them being con- 
tent with as little as five bones a 
day. Most important of all, they 
have not yet acquired that bane 
of directors existence — temperament. 



"Why I'm not planted beneath the sod, I'll explain to 
you at once. I was saved, my son, for directors run clear 
out of their stock of stunts!" 

The Plaint of a Patriot 

I bought shoes ! Two shoes ! Happily did I attire my 
feet ! But, oh, those feet ! Poor, tortured, anguished feet ! 
Ah, how the shoes abused them ! 

I went into the film theater. Haven to rest my feet 
therein ! Also to view the glorious war drama. Ah, so 
cool, so dim, the theater! Here shall I sit and rest my 
sobbing feet ! 

The orchestra played Star Spangled Banner, appropriate 
for glorious war drama. Everybody arose. I also. Ah, 
the pain of feet ! Years after everybody sat down.. I also. 
In gladness and joy I sat ! 

Again, and yet again the orchestra played Star Spangled 
Banner, appropriate for glorious war drama. Everybody 
arose. I also. My feet screamed ! Their agony wrung 
my heart, my soul ! 

I removed my shoes. I went home. In my socks I 
walked. Ah, happy feet! Uncramped ! So deliciously 
spread out ! Luxury ! 

I'd say something, only — 

Sherman beat me to it! —Harry J. Smalh-y. 



Preparedness is the Moving 




TRIANGLE -KEYSTONE 



Ann Kroman, Mildred Campbell, Jean Mygene, Myrtle Reeves 

and Rose Carter all prepared for the studio. No wonder they're 

bears for work, out in California. 





ESSANAY 

Mary McAlister preparing to assume a citizen's 

responsibilities, in "Sadie Goes to Heaven." 

She has just knocked out the boss's son. 



PARAMOUNT- 
SENNETT 




You can tell from her ex- 
pression that Mrs. Sidney 
Drew is prepared for any 
scrape her husband may be 
getting into, in "The Un- 
married Look." 







A solo singer 
prepared to 
complicate 
the chorus 
in "Taming 
Target Cen- 
ter." 




MUTUAL-STRAND 



Billie Rhodes, amiable as always, is preparing 

to help out if she can with any explanation he 

can offer for this amazing situation in "Tom, 

Dick and Harry." 




AMERICAN-MUTUAL 



The army is always prepared. Investigations are 
useful in demonstrating the fact. But Margarita 
Fischer, in "Miss Jackie of the Army," supplies 
the lubricant of laughter which insures smooth running. 



Motive in These Comedies 




EDWARD WARREN PRODUCTIONS 

In this delightful comedy- 
scene from the very beau- 
tiful play, "Weavers of 
Life," Helen Hayes, as 
Peggy, and Dorothy Ben- 
ham, as Bessie, prepare 
for a brave good-by. 



PARAMOUNT-SENNETT 



Slim Sum- 
merville i s 
prepared to 
put this 
product o f 
Louise Fa- 
zenda's art- 
istry where 
it will do the 
most good. 
S 1 i m is a 
regular play- 
er and has 
no reason 
for looking 
so lean. 



Polly Moran, as a visiting "she-sheriff," prepares thus 
for culture and harmony in Target Center. Perfect ac- 
complishment is shown in this best-yet release of the 
Sennett comedies. 




TRIANGLE-KEYSTONE 

In an off moment between scenes Peggy Pearce, Maud 

Wayne, Aileen Allen, Harry Depp and Claire Anderson 

prepare to welcome home Harry Gribbon, who holds the 

doll. Harry has just signed a new contract. 



RMOUNT ARBUCH 



Fatty Arbuckle is preparing needed discipline for this 
chap; but don't shiver. "A Country Hero" was staged 
in California, and they had four cases of heat prostra- 
tion at Pasadena's Flower Festival on January 1st. 



All Up I ii t 



e 



i r 




GENERAL FILM 



In "Tne Enchanted Kiss," one of the late O Henry films, Chet Ryan, as Sam Tansey, in his absinthe dream wanders 

through roof gardens and other 
suburbs of paradise like this. 





George Walsh 14 feet 
up-in-the-air in "The 
Pride of New York," a 
war film. This young 
Fox star doesn't permit 
a little thing like altitude 
to interfere with his aim 



William 
Russell's 
spectacular 
rise to star- 
d o m is 
marked b y 



AMERICAN-MUTuat 



milest ones 
such as this 
scene with 
Joe King in 
"The Sea 
Master." 



AMERICAN 

It would be news if we 
told you William Russell 
is supporting Douglas 
Fairbanks, but here's the 
evidence. "It's always 
pleasant weather when 
good fellows get together' ' 




Virginia Lee Corbin, five-year-old Fox star, in "Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp," is surely justified in strenuously 
objecting to the situation she finds herself in. The king of beasts apparently disdains such a mite as not fit fare even 

as an acoetizer. 



A Record for 
Ancestors 

TTAPPINESS is contagious, and pictures 
like these are always pleasing, because 
we can each of us recall our own joy on 
some similar occasion. 

Every household has its celebrations 
throughout the year, and the fashion is now 
well established of making motion pictures 
of the more elaborate and important family 
festivals, such as the first-born's birthday 
party when he is a year old or twenty-one 
years old, or sister's coming-out party. 
This preachment is designed to help every- 
body "get the habit." 

Now that the boys from some half mil- 
lion families throughout our land are leav- 
ing for service in the army, with more and 
more to follow them into the field, these 
celebrations take on a deeper significance 
as it is borne in upon us that a time may 
come when such a picture record will be in- 
finitely comforting. 

Apparatus for making motion pictures 
of such scenes has been perfected and can be bought and 
operated by the same hope-of-the-household who did so 
well with wireless telegraphy up to the time that war 
necessitated suspension of his activities in that direction. 
Expenditures for equipment may be on the sky-is-the-limit 
basis, for those who can afford the best, but they need not 




BALBOA 

They gave a very pretty party of welcome to Roscoe (Fatty) Ar- 
buckle when he arrived at the coast studios. "An enjoyable 
time was had by all," as you can see. With the guest of honor, 
in the center of the picture, are President H. M. Horkheimer 
(left) and Vice-President E. D. Horkheimer, of the Balboa 

company. 

be. Several different makes of motion picture cameras 
adequate to all household requirements can be had from 
$125 up. There is even a little machine, which carries 
but fifty feet of film, which doesn't cost more than $50. 
A projection machine absolutely safe and guaranteed against 
(Continued in advertising section.) 





' ' Beauty is as beau- 
ty does." Under 
that rule, everyone 
in the picture be- 
longs to the Trian- 
gle-Keystone Beau- 
ty Brigade, for they 
are packing the 
" smokes" that 
were sent to our 
soldier boys in 
France. 




63. -v 

TRIANGLE-KEYSTONE 



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See 

LESLIE'S WEEKLY 

for the Best War 

Pictures First 

For sale on all news-stands 
Ten Cents Every Week 



$-01d Coins Wanted— $ 

£4.25 EACH paid for U. S. Flying Eagle Cents dated 1856. 
J2 to $500 EACH paid for hundreds of Coins dated before 1910. 
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Among the World Famous Brady - 
Made late releases, Kittie Gordon is to 
be seen in "Diamonds and Pearls," 
and Ethel Clayton appears in "Stolen 
Hours," a romantic story of modern 
London life. 

-?- 

Sessue Hayakawa's recent release, 

"Hidden Pearls," in which he appears 
as Nara-Nara, a Japanese secret service 
man, deals with German intrigue. The 
movement of troops from Pacific coast 
ports, made available for this picture, 
and the scenes staged in the Hawaiian 
Islands, will be found of unusual inter- 
est as well as beauty. 

-5- 

Metro projects for 1918 include the 

filming of Myrtle Reed's "Weaver of 
Dreams," with Viola Dana as star. 
The Western studios are being rebuilt 
and enlarged under personal supervi- 
sion of B. A. Rolfe, and much of the 
work will hereafter be staged out there. 
An interesting item in their forecast 
for the year is that all scenarios will 
be adaptations of popular stories or 

stage successes. 

-5- 
George Beban's "Jules of the Strong 

Heart," released January 14th, is to be 
followed by a new play, to be called 
"One More American." The better 
understanding by the Allies of the good 
faith and fidelity which are fundamen- 
tals in Italian character is one of the 
good things that we will gain out of 
this war, and as an interpreter of that 
people there could be none better than 
George Beban. 

A film version of "Jack Spurlock, 
Prodigal," is to be released about Feb- 
ruary 1st. The story, first published 
in the Saturday Evening Post, is by 
George Horace Lorimer. The hero, a 
lovable rebel against the established 
order of things, is as exactly suited to 
the talents and the personality of George 
Walsh, who plays the title role, as 
though Mr. Lorimer had had Walsh 
and the films in mind when he wrote 
the story. 

Marguerite Fisher, film favorite and 
star for the American Film Company, 
is hereafter to have her very own sce- 
nario writer, in the person of Miss Bea- 
trice Van, formerly a writer of maga- 
zine stories, and more recently a player 
in pictures. "Jackie of the Army" 
and "Molly Go Get 'Em," Miss Fish- 
er's latest releases, have given box- 



office demonstration of the fact that 
Miss Van's scenarios are exactly fitted 
to Miss Fisher's requirements. 
-?- 
Pathe's motion pictures of the disas- 
ter in Halifax, it may be, had more to 
do with the tremendous success of the 
membership drive of the Red Cross 
than its managers at the time realized. 
They were on the screen almost before 
reverberations were over, and showed 
the Red Cross relief was the first on the 
ground, its train, fully equipped, hav- 
ing fought its way through the storm. 
This is the sort of thing likely to appeal 
to the ' ' Missourian' ' that abides in most 
of us. No wonder the enrollment of 
new members brought the total up to 
more than twenty millions, and that 
nearly twice as many as had been 
planned and prayed for have joined the 

Red Cross. 

-?- 
A late acquisition to the staff of the 

Goldwyn Pictures Corporation is Miss 
Elizabeth Jordan, who became editorial 
director for Goldwyn on January 2d. 
Miss Jordan was formerly editor of 
Harper's Bazar and is the author of 
many popular stories and is eminently 
able to act in a much-needed capacity. 
So far as we know, this is the second 
instance of such an appointment, Julian 
Johnson's association with Triangle as 
editor-in-chief being the first. The lat- 
ter, according to Triangle's announce- 
ment, is to pass upon the finished prod- 
uct of the studios. If all studios will 
follow this wise lead of Goldwyn and 
Triangle, it will mark the peaceful 
passing of the censor. He will be out 
of a job. Censoring was never much 
of a job, anyhow. 



><<<1 It. III. Ill 



Film Fun 

Magazine of Fun, Judge's Library and 
Sis Hopkins' Own Book Combined. 

No. 347— FEBRUARY, 1918 



iiminmiiimminmiin 



Single Copies, 10 Cents 
Subscription by the Year, $1.00 



imiiiiimiiiiimimiiiii 



Published monthly by 

LESLIE-JUDGE COMPANY, PUBLISHERS 

NEW YORK CITY. 

John A. Sleicher, President. 

Reuben P. Sleicher, Secretary. 
A. E. Rollauer, Treasurer. 

Grant Hamilton, Art Director. 
Jessie Niles Burness, Editor. 

225 Fifth Avenue, New York. 



iiimiiiiimiNiiiniimiii 



iiiimuimiiuiiiiiiiuii 



Copyright, 1918, by Leslie-Judge Company, 
Publisheri. 

Title registered as a trade-mark. 

Entered at the post-office at New York as 
second-class matter. 



As 
You 
Like 

It 




WHEN you arrive at home after a riotous day in the 
office, and you are so doggone tired that you 
hover on the ragged edge of a grouch, which the 
disturbing war news in your evening paper hasn't 
reduced a particle; and you eat a good dinner— with or 
without meat — and the mental mists begin to dissolve 
and life doesn't seem such a woful thing after all; and 
you draw up your favorite armchair to the reading light 
and reach out for something to help you forget yourself, 
and you pick up a copy of JUDGE, and begin to grin and 
then to chuckle and then to roar, while The Only Woman 
smiles at you sympathetically from the other side of the 
table— isn't it a glorious feeling? Can you beat it? 



J 



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Because it is a bubbling, cheerful, stimulating friend ; a friend who rides no hob- 
bies, except happiness; who flourishes no enmities, except a supreme hatred for 
the Common Foe of Civilization — Militaristic Germany ; who parades no fads and 
promulgates no eccentricities; a breezy, rollicking comrade with a vein of tender- 
ness, a sparkling wit and exhaustless pep — JUDGE is beloved of the nation. With 
a copy of JUDGE in your hand you can defy all the hordes of boredum and all 
the demons of ennui. 



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I AVE your sense of humor as well as the food in 
your larder. Hooverize your rebellion against the 
high cost of living by becoming a perfectly good 
optimist through the influence of JUDGE. Don't be 
Zeppelined by unfounded fears or submarined by false 
economy. The war will be won by soldiers who smile, 
not by those who sing hymns of Hate. Get behind 
JUDGE'S 42-centimetre gun that punctures the dugouts 
of doubt and despair. Cut out the frowns, and smile, 
smile, smile with JUDGE. 



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worry from the trenches of discontent. Ac- / 
quire the get-thee-behind-me-Satan attitude / 
of mind that comes from a reading of 
JUDGE — the happy medium. 



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Over the Top with Your Dollar! 

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little dollar? You can do it if you mail the coupon in the / 

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Toot! Toot! Toot! All aboard for the Land of Laughter! /street 
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and take your seat in the Pullman. Here is your ticket / city 

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Mary Miles Minter and Her Hands 

(Continued from a previous page) 
Mary's hand, too. It seems that a famous palmist — one of the international variety 
who reads presidential hands and all that sort of things — saw the cast one day and 
predicted a wonderful future for the owner. Mary was only a baby then, and her 
mother smiled at the prediction that one day the girl that owned that hand would be 
known in every country of the world as one of its most popular and famous actresses. 

But — you see? 

Well, anyway, Mrs. Shelby, Mary's mother, has endeavored to obtain that baby 
hand cast from Mr. Wall. But he will not part with it at any price, and it still 
occupies a place of honor in his New York studio. 

" Now about my hands, " went on Miss Minter, looking at them critically. "I 
really ought to take better care of them, oughtn't I? You know, mother feels dread- 
fully because I take no pride in my hands. Every Monday morning, regular as 
clockwork, they haul me down to Goff's, and they try to fix my hands to look nice. 
But within an hour afterward I have them all 'gormy' with gardening or mending 
ropes or climbing trees or poking around in the studio. But they won't give me 
any nice, ladylike parts to do, so how can I help it?" 

"Mary's as fussy as can be about her hair and her baths," broke in her mother, 
"but, some way, we cannot get her to take pride in her hands. She'd much prefer 
to be pottering around at work that makes them chapped and rough than to wear 
gloves and take care of them." 

"Well, but hands were made to work with," she protested, "not just for orna- 
ments. And there's so much to do all the time." 

So that's the secret of those sturdy, active little Minter hands, that would much 
prefer to be doing something for somebody than to be idle and smooth and white. 
Strong little hands, as you can see, with well-balanced lines, which denote a generous, 
impulsive nature, an ability to handle hard jobs, and no tendency to shrink from a 
task merely because it is disagreeable. There is a good thumb, you will note, indicating 
executive ability and power of leadership and plenty if wisely directed will energy. 

They may not be white or slender or any of the things you read about, but they 
are the type of hands that will always make the world a heap better just because they 
have helped do the things that lay before them. 

Who's Who, in Rhyme 

By HOWARD DIETZ CLEMENT WOOD 
CHARLES CHAPLIN 
He skips along and trips along and slips and double-dips along — 

C. Chaplin is the subject of our song, 
The dapper acrobatical, the silly cinematical, 

The voicelessly dramatical — the jester for the throng. 

He slaps about and flaps about and kicks his fellow-chaps about — 

C. Chaplin is the tumbler that we tout — 
A tumbler more spectacular than preachers tabernacular, 

And though we're not oracular, he's worth a lyric shout. 

He wheels again and reels again and wriggles with his heels again — ■ 

C. Chaplin pulls the paeans from our pen; 
He trips the light fantastical and wakes enthusiastical 

Applause for his gymnastical ability. Amen ! 

A Record for Ancestors 

(Continued from a previous page) 
fire can be had for $175. Most of the cameras carry 500 feet of film. The workroom 
can be equipped with all necessaries for about $200, even including an appropriate 
cabinet for filing the negatives. 

Just think what such a record as may be made in these days for small outlay 
would mean if available to the descendants of folks who came across in the Mayflower 
or to the Daughters of the Revolution ! We have always inclined to the belief that too 
much consideration has usually been given to having ancestors, and not enough to 
qualifying ourselves to serve worthily as ancestors, when our time comes. 

Here's the best possible chance to prove such an experiment worth while. Get 
busy, if you have the price, the energy and the ambition. 

Or, if you prefer, just buy the cabinet and employ professionals to make the motion 
pictures as occasions present themselves. But see to it that the record is well kept. 



Buy a $4. 1 3 War Savings Stamp 

The Government Buys it Back 
from You January 1st, 1923, for 

$5.00 

Buy it outright for Cash. Or buy it on the Installment Plan : 25c down and 

25c as often as you can spare it 

HOW TO BUY IT ON THE INSTALLMENT PLAN 



Go to any bank or post office. 

When you get inside, look for the stamp win- 
dow where they are selling War Savings Stamps. 

Pay 25c, and the man at the window will give 
you a U. S. Government Thrift Stamp and a 
Thrift Card. 

Paste your Thrift Stamp on your Thrift Card. 

When you feel like saving another 25c, buy an- 
other Thrift Stamp and paste it on the same card. 

When you have pasted sixteen of these Thrift 
Stamps on your Thrift Card, take this card to any 
bank or post office and give it to the man at the 
Savings Stamp window. 

Also give him 13c. 

The man will give you a W. S. S. — a U. S. War 
Savings Stamp. 

He will also give you a U. S. War Savings 
Certificate. 

A War Savings Certificate is a pocket-size folder 
on which you can paste 20 War Savings Stamps. 

Paste your War Savings Stamp in your War 
Savings Certificate. 

Take good care of it, as it is worth $4.13. 

On January 1st, 1923, the U. S. Government 
buys this War Savings Certificate from you, pay- 
ing you $5 for every stamp pasted on it. 



Thus your War Savings Certificate has made 
you a profit of 87c on each stamp pasted on it. 

This profit is 4 fo interest compounded quarterly. 

It is a good profit and it is guaranteed to you 
by the U. S. Government — the safest guarantee in 
the world. 

Every man, woman and child, in this hour of 
our country's need, should save money and buy as 
many War Savings Stamps as he can afford. 

You can buy your second War Savings Stamp 
on the installment plan just as you bought your 
first one. 

Paste your second War Savings Stamp into your 
War Savings Certificate. 

Continue to buy War Savings Stamps in this 
way until you have pasted twenty of them in your 
War Savings Certificate. 

Then you will have a complete War Savings 
Certificate. 

On January 1st, 1923, the U. S. Government 
will pay you $100 for this complete War Savings 
Certificate. 

Thus you have made a profit of $17.40 on your 
War Savings Certificate. 

This profit is 4 °/o interest compounded quarterly. 

It is a good profit and is guaranteed to you by 
the U. S. Government — the strongest guarantee in 
the world. 



HOW TO BUY IT FOR CASH 



If you do not wish to buy War Savings Stamps 
on the Installment plan as explained above, you 
simply pay $4.13 at the War Savings Stamp win- 
dow of any bank or post office. 

War Savings Stamps cost $4.13 during the 
month of February. 

After February they go up one cent more each 
month. 

So you see, the sooner you buy your stamps, 
the more money you earn on them. 

If you should need your money at any time, 
take your War Savings Certificate to any post office. 



The post office will give you back your money 
plus accrued interest at the rate of about 3 % . 

If you do not wish to go to a post office or a 
bank, write on a postcard "Send me one 25-cent 
Thrift Stamp, C. O. D." 

And write your name and address on the 
postcard. 

Address the postcard to "The Post Office." 
Next day your postman will bring you a 25-cent 
Thrift Stamp and a Thrift Card, C. O. D. 
Start buying a War Savings Stamp today. 



w. s. s. 

WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

ISSUED BY THE 

United States Government 



The Leslie-Judge Co. is an authorized agent of the United States Government in the 6ale of Thrift Stamps and War Savings Stamps 

to the public. Our services are gladly rendered free. 



This space has been contributed by the publishers of Film Fun 



.■mini mil 



TTHIS picture, 
in full colors, 
9 x 12, mounted 
on a heavy mat, 
ready for the 
frame, will be 
sent postpaid for 



25c 




Judge Art Print 
Department 

225 Fifth Avenue A •»"- FOR JACK 

New York City James Montgomery Flagg j 



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| OUR READERS' COLUMN ! 

1 This department belongs to the readers 1 

| of Film Fun. Write us and tell us what i 

| you think about it. If we can help you, § 

| write and tell us so. If you like our maga- | 

| zine, tell us about it. If you do not like | 

I it, tell us anyway. We want to know | 

1 just what you think about it. 

ilimiiiiimMiiimiiiiuiiiimiiiiiiimiiiijmiiiiiiimiiiiiNmiiiiitiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiimiiiim 

A. F. B., Eagle Point, Ore.— Mary 
Thurman's address is care Keystone 
Film Co., 1712 Allesandro Street, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

L. J., Chicago, 111. — You can apply 
for work at any motion picture studio. 
There are many in Chicago. You are 
very young to begin, and my advice 
would be, stick to your studies and per- 
fect yourself in singing and dancing. 
This will help you to a better chance. 

E. L., Auburn, Mass. — A letter ad- 
dressed to Pauline Frederick, in care 
of Paramount Pictures Corporation, 485 
Fifth Avenue, New York, will doubt- 
less reach her in due time. Her Janu- 
ary release is "Mrs. Dane's Defense." 
In addition to her appearances on the 
screen, she has resumed her stage work. 
We do not know Evelyn Nesbit's ad- 
dress. 

Anonymous, Portland, Ore. — How 
could you serve us so? Whether we 
agree with you or not — and we do and 
we do not — it is the sort of a letter we 
like; it stimulates. And we have an- 
other letter of the same sort, on the sub- 
ject of censors, from Washington, D. C, 
which, like your own, is signed "A 
Friend." We would like to reply at 
length to both, but it is a rule in jour- 
nalism, never departed from, not to 
reply to an anonymous communication. 
Come again, won't you please? 

The Twins, Elizabeth City, N. C— 
Getting into the pictures is a very diffi- 
cult undertaking, and many of those 
who have worked hard and long, and 
finally have gotten in, wish they were 
out. Inasmuch as you ask my advice, 
it is "don't," unless you want to work 
very hard for a long time at small 
wages. Olive Thomas is now in Cali- 
fornia. She was married to Jack Pick- 
ford a short time ago. Ralph Kellard 
will probably receive mail addressed in 
care of Pathe studios at Jersey City. 
Shirley Mason's home address is 350 
Mosholu Parkway, New York City. 

K. Yasuda, Tokyo, Japan. — You will 
find the addresses you ask for in the 
"Studio Directory," on the last page 
of Film Fun each month. The Motion 
Picture News Publishing Company is 
one of the very best of the motion pic- 
ture trade journals. It is not connected 
with any other concern. H. M. and 
E, D. Horkheimer are president and 
vice-president of the Balboa Amuse- 
ment Company at Long Beach, Cal. 
When pictures are advertised as you 
have noted, it usually means that a 
picture produced by the one company 
is being released to exhibitors by the 
other company. 



Studio Directory 

For the convenience of our readers 
who may desire the addresses of film 
companies, we give the principal ones 
below. The first is the business office ; 
(s) indicates a studio; at times both 
may be at one address. 

American Film Mfg. Co., 6227 Broadway, Chica- 
go, 111. Santa Barbara, Cal. (s). 

Artcraft Pictures Corporation (Mary Pickford, 
Douglas Fairbanks, et al.). 485 Fifth Avenue, 
New York City. Hollywood, Cal. (s). 

Balboa Amusement Producing Co., Long 
Beach, Cal. (s). 

Brenon, Herbert, Prod., 729 Seventh Ave., New 
York City. Hudson Heights, N. J. (s) 

Christie Film Corp., Main and Washington 
Sts., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Cosmofotofilm Co., Candler Building, New 
York City. 

Clara Kimball Young Company, Aeolian Hall, 
New York City. 

Edison, Thomas, Inc., 2826 Decatur Ave., New 
York City. (s). 

Educational Films Corporation. 729 Seventh 
Ave., New York City. 

Empire All Star Corporation, 220 S. State St., 
Chicago, III. Myrtle Ave.,GlendaIe,L.I.(s). 

Essanay Film Mfg. Co., 1333 Argyle St., Chica- 
go, 111. (s). 

Famous Players - Lasky Film Company, 485 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. 128 W. 56th 
Street, New York City. (s). 

Fox Film Corporation, 130 West 46th St.. New 
York City. 1401 Western Ave., Los Ange- 
les, Cal. (s). Fort Lee, N. J. (s). 

Gaumont Company, 110 West 40th Street, New 
York City. Flushing, N. Y. (s). Jackson- 
ville, Fla. (s). 

Goldwyn Film Corp., 16 E. 42d St., New York 
City. Fort Lee, N. J. (s). 

General Film Company, 440 Fourth Ave., New 
York City. 

Horsley Studio, Main and Washington, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Kalem Company, 325 West tsd St., New York 
City. 251 W. 19th St., New York City. (s). 
1425 Fleming St., Hollywood, Cal. (s). Tal- 
lyrand Ave., Jacksonville, Fla. (s). Glen- 
dale, Cal. (s). 

Keystone Film Co., 1712 Allesandro St., Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Kleine, George, 166 N. State St., Chicago. 

Metro Pictures Corp., 1476 Broadway, New 
York City. Rolfe Photoplay Co. and Colum- 
bia Pictures Corp., 3 West 61st St., New 
York City. (s). Popular Plays and Players, 
Fort Lee, N. J. (s). Quality Pictures Corp., 
Metro Office. Yorke Film Co., Hollywood, 
Cal. (s). 

Morosco Photoplay Company, 485 Fifth Ave., 
New York City. 201 Occidental Blvd., Lo» 
Angeles, Cal. (s). 

Moss, B. S., 729 Seventh Ave., New York City. 

Mayfair Pictures Corp., 10 Wall St., New York 
City. 515 W, 54th Street, New York City.(s). 

Mutual Film Corp., Consumers Building, Chi- 
cago. 

Paramount Pictures Corporation. 71 W. 23d 
St., New York City. 485 Fifth Ave., New 
York City. 

Peralta Plays, Inc., 729 Seventh Ave., New York 
City. Los Angeles, Cal. (s). 

Pathe Exchange, 25 West 45th St., New York 
City. Jersey City, N. J. (s). 

Petrova Pictures, 25 W. 44th St., New York 
City. 807 W. 176th St., New York City. (■). 

Powell, Frank, Production Co., Times Building, 
New York City. 

Rothacker Film Mfg. Co., 1339 Diversey Park- 
way. Chicago, 111. (s). 

Selig Polyscope Co., Garland Bldg., Chicago, 
Western and Irving Park Blvd., Chicago.(s). 
3800 Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. (s). 

Select Pictures Corp., 729 Seventh Ave., New 
York City. 807 East 176th Street. New 
York City, (s), 

Signal Film Corp., 4560 Pasadena Ave., Los An- 
geles. Cal. (s). 

Talmadge, Norma, 729 Seventh Ave., New York 
City. 318 East 48th Street, New York 
City. (s). 

Thanhouser Film Corp., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
(s). Jacksonville, Fla. (s). 

Triangle Company, 1457 Broadway, New York 
City. Culver City, Cal. (s). 

Universal Film Mfg, Co., 1600 Broadway, New 
York City Universal City, Cal. (s). Coy- 
etsville, N. J. (s). 

Vitagraph Company of America, 1600 Broad- 
way, New York City E. 15th Street and 
Locust Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. (s). Holly- 
wood, Cal. (s) 

Vogue Comedy Co GowerSt. and Santa Moni- 
ca Bldg., Hollywood, Cal. 

World Film Corp,. 130 West 46th St.New York 
City. Fort Lee, N.J. (s). 




"WALL-NUTS" "GOOD-NIGHT, NURSE - ' 

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FILM FUN and 
drawn from 1 i f r 
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COPYRIGHT 101H BY 
LESLIE-JUDGE CO., 
NEW YORK CITY 



Contributors 
in this number: 

Geraldine Farrav 

Sidney Drew 

Mary Garden 

Mae Marsh 
Linda A. Griffith 

Norma Talmadge 
Winifred Allen 
Kate Carter 
William Russell 
and others 



NORMA TALMADGE 



VIRTUE IN THE BALLET 

Of all the witches and semi-witches ot that eternal Wal- 
purgis Night that represents the world, the ladies of the ballet 
have at all times and in all places been regarded as least like 
saints. 

Whenever a new, youthful dancer appeared at the Paris 
Opera House the habitues vied with each other in showering 
her with attentions and in overwhelming her Avith a veritable 
broadside of Cupid's artillery. 

For how could these young- and pretty girls with every 
right to life, love and pleasure, and subsisting on a very small 
salary, resist the seduction of the smell of flowers and of the 
glitter of jewels ? 

She had the voluptuous form of a Greek Helen and she 
took the old guard of the Opera House by storm. The very next 
morning a perfect shower of billets-doux, jewels, and bouquets 
fell into the poor dancer's modest apartment. 

He was a rich stockbroker, one of those generous gen- 
tlemen," if the object of his momentary fancy was young and 
pretty and apparently unsophisticated. And then there was 
another, who sent no diamonds, and not even flowers, but who 
was young and goodlooking, though poor, and who worshipped 
her from afar until that memorable night — but read the whole 
story for yourself as Maupassant tells it — an amusing story that 
is a gem of art and irony, a story with an unexpected ending 
that will do your heart good, and found with all Maupassant's 
other inimitable stories, his novels, his poems and dramas, in 
this superb VERDUN EDITION of 

THE COMPLETE WORKS 

OF 

GUY de MAUPASSANT 

UNABRIDGED AND UNEXPURGATED 

Maupassant does not moralize. In the wonderful pictures he gives of the 
world he lived in virtue is praised and vice is condemned rather by events 
and action. If he is terribly real, and the nudity of his human nature is 
startling in its effect, it is because his stories mirror life as he found it. 

A SPECIALLY LOW BEFORE - PUBLICATION PRICE 

READY IN A FEW DAYS A Fine Library Edition REALISM UNALLOYED 




By the time your order can reach us the 17 
volumes will have been delivered to the binder. 
Every day's delay means a substantial increase in 
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tion offer will enable us to estimate the size of 
our order tor binding. We give before-publication 
subscribers the benefit of the saving we make by 
ordering in quantity. 

$1.00 NOW AND COUPON 
secures your set at the present before-publication 
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(or more) a month after you receive the books. 
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given to subscriptions accompanied by the pres- 
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delivered charges prepaid. 

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present liefore-publication price. $19 On. which I n^ree to 
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ceipt of books. Otherwise I will within five days ask for 
instructions for their return, at your expense, my SI. 00 to 
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Name 



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a Occupation State . 



The beautiful full page frontispiece, 
Illustrations hare, been specially made for 
the VERDUN EDITION by the talen- 
ted artist. J. E. Allen. This is the only 
English translation of Maupassant con- 
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17 Volumes in Rich Cloth Binding 

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5,500 Pages That Will Hold You Chained by 
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347 Stories, Novels, Novelettes, 
Poems. Dramas. Entertainment for 
a Thousand and One Nights. Love 
and Life in Strange Lands — Paris. 
The Orient. The African Hinter- 
land. Stories of War. Crime. 
Mystery and Horror. 

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The petty meannesses of human nature 
and the passions — lust and cupidity — which 
stir most men and women toaction did not 
stay Maupassant's impartial hand so long 
as this ugly side of humanity existed. 
Pitiless as is his art, at times he surprises 
us with a touch offender pathos in which 
we recognize the warm heart of a fellowman. 

GREATEST OF STORY 
WRITERS 

As the supreme master in what is one 
of the most difficult forms of art — the short 
story — Maupassant's fame has extended 
into all civilized lands. Tolstoy marveled 
at the depth of human interest he found in 
his stories; Andrew Lang declared he found 
in him ""the tenderness of Eielding. the 
graphic power of Smollett, the biting satire 
of Dean Swift, mingled and reincarnated 
in Gallic guise;" and Henry James hailed 
him as '"a man of genius who had achieved 
the miracle of a fresh tone." 



MAR 16 1918 
DLB41022QC 



i 




June Caprice, in "The Heart of Romance," is trying to involve her canine guardian in mischief. 



Film Fun 

225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

An Independent Illustrated Monthly Magazine 
Devoted to the Best Interests of All 
Motion Picture Art and Artists 

MARCH -APRIL - 1918 



ILLUSTRATED FEATURES: 

Film Humor More Than Making 

Funny Faces 
Clothes— A Vital Theme 
Smiles on the Screen — and Tears 
An Easterner in the Golden West 
Thais, the Woman That Preys 
To the Studio by Aerial-Taxi 

A Genuine Jungle Story 

Is the Star System All Wrong ? 

EDITORIALS : 

Virginia Takes the Lead 
The Box Office Rebuke 
Royalties for Authors 
" Sueitis " — a Side Line 
COMMENTS OF A FREE LANCE : 
At Last a Super-picture 



Contents 



Sidney Drew 
Norma Talmadge 
Mae Marsh 
William Russell, 
Mary Garden 
Winifred Allen 
(Mrs Lawrence B. Spewy) 
Elizabeth Lang Foy 
Kate Carter 



Mary Garden Fails to Score 
"His Mother's Boy " 
Beban Never Disappoints 
Animal Stars in tlie Movies 
"The Last Leaf " 
Couldn't Get a Drink 



Linda A. Griffith 



MISCELLANEOUS : 

Film Flashes; Some News Nuggets and Critical Quips 
The A ge of Reason 
Who's Who and Where. 

Ambition (Illustrated by the Author) Bernardine Hilty 

A Fair Start 
The Studio Directory 
ART PORTRAITS : 

Mme. Petrova, Catherine Calvert, May Allison and Norma 
Talmadge; character poses of Clara Kimball Young, Fannie 
Ward, Charlie Chaplin and Harry Lauder, Corinne Grant 
and Hillarie Stevens. 



#122 a year 



Number 348 



10c a copy 




PETBOVA PICTURES 



MABCEAU PHOTO 



Madam Olga Petrova seems to be dreaming thus: "Will some of my pictures endure like the old 
tapestries? Perhaps, if one is content to work as the master weavers did, in the long ago.'' 9 




GENERAL FILM 



'I hate to follow his trail when I don't know which way he went," muses Henry King, in ll The Main 

Spring. ' ' The play was filmed in the Mojave Desert. 



E 



D 



I 



O R 



I 



Virginia Takes the Lead 

A BILL has been introduced in the Virginia General 
Assembly, by Representative J. P. Jones, "to 
purify and elevate the standards of the photo- 
play." This should be a hint to producers, 
many of whom curtailed or suspended production when the 
false alarm began to sound. There is no occasion for 
panic. Motion pictures are a permanent institution; they 
are a part of life. But they are badly in need of improve- 
ment. By securing the co-operation of able writers, it 
would be possible to get real plays, the kind which truly 
present the interesting aspects of the actual life of the fine, 
clean, fit, progressive American people. Such plays would 
be worthy of the exquisite craftsmanship to which the me- 
chanical side of the pictures has attained. But this co- 
operation must be skillfully wooed before it can be won, 
because writers throughout the land are loud in denuncia- 
tion of prevailing conditions. A thorough reconstruction 
and the application of recognized business principles is 
what will be the salvation at this time of those producers 
who heed the handwriting on the wall. 

The Box-office Rebuke 

WITH two or three motion picture theaters within 
easy walking distance from his home, any fan 
is foolish who fails to see the sort of plays he 
likes and to get his money's worth at every 
performance he attends. No director can make consistently 
a play perfect in all respects, but open booking, which now 
prevails, amounts on the part of producers to an offer to 
bear the burden of their own mistakes, and this makes it 
easy for the picture-lover to lodge the most effective pro- 
test against poor plays — a rebuke that will be heeded and 



acted upon. Any sort of play that doesn't make a good 
box-office showing will be discontinued. So cultivate the 
habit of going to those theaters that give the plays you like. 

Royalties for Authors 

IT WOULD seem the fair thing for writers of scenarios 
to share profits in a way similar to that which pre- 
vails between publishers and writers of books. Such 
an agreement would insure to all concerned a proper 
share of earnings, and if generally understood it would 
discourage poor productions and promote the greatest good 
to the greatest number. 

A Side-line 

THERE is a new diversion in the motion picture 
world. It is called sueitis. It is highly amusing 
and lucrative — for the one that wins. George 
Arliss sued the Herbert Brenon Corporation, be- 
cause he claimed they failed to keep their contract with 
him. The amount involved was a little matter of $22,500, 
which was to cover the actor's services in a production of 
"Faust." Arliss won. Then Theda Bara, of vampire 
fame, brought suit against Major M. L. C. Funkhouser, 
movie censor, for $100,000 damages, alleging libel and 
slander. Funkhouser dared to criticise her attire in vari- 
ous pictures. Now Billie Burke has begun suit to collect 
$34,000, which she claims as her due on a contract to play 
the leading part in "The Rescuing Angei." She contends 
that twenty-three weeks' salary is still owing her. Also, if 
she wins the money, she will turn it over to the Red Cross ! 
It is a pleasant pastime, to say nothing of the free public- 
ity it gives one. Also it suggests that all the drama and 
comedy of the screen sphere are not filmed. 




Mil 

FRANK A. KEENEY PICTUBES 



LTTMIEBE PHOTO 



Catherine Calvert is star in "A Romance of the Un- 
derworld" the first release of this new corporation. 



Flash Backs 

Some News Nuggets and Critical Quips 

ANNETTE KELLERMANN dove into fame, and Ann 
Pennington got there with both feet. 
No wonder the West is wild — when you con- 
sider what "Fatty" Arbuckle does to it in his "Out West" ! 

Vivian Martin's new play is called "A Petticoat Pilot." 
That kind of a pilot has piled many a man on the rocks. 

Says Bill Carney, the auburn-haired property man at 
the Fox studio: "Aw, When a Man Sees Red, he puts him 
to work!" 

Clara Kimball Young will appear in Marcin's "House 
of Glass." There will be none of the famed clarakyoung 
disrobing scenes in this play — for obvious reasons ! 

A certain film company advised writers not to roll their 
scenarios, but to send them in flat. Guess they got what 
they asked for, because their recent pictures were de- 
cidedly so. 

Bessie Barriscale never allows her husband, Howard 
Hickman, around her dressing-room at the studio. Not 
since she caught Howard touching up his white shoes with 
her best powder puff. 

Shirley Mason exercises to keep thin. Victor Potel ex- 
ercises to get fat. Victor Moore exercises to get thin. 
Roscoe Arbuckle exercises to keep fat. Funny ol' place, 
this film world, isn't it? 

Burglars are barred from the films in Ohio by the State 
Board of Censors. They are still allowed, however, to 
burgle your flat while you are at the theater. What Ohio 
needs is more coppers and less knockers. 

Helen Holmes's adopted baby insists upon having a 
miniature train to play with, instead of the usual infantile 
toys. Ah, well, sometimes we inherit a trait and some- 
times we just absorb it from our surroundings ! 

That big grin on the face of Nature, better known as 
the Grand Canyon, is said to be slowly closing up. Fair- 
banks recently made a picture there, and the G. C, after 
seeing Doug's smile, probably gave up in despair. 

Marshall Neilan was rejected by army examiners on 
account of poor eyesight. The children who played as 
"extras" in "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm" declare 
NOTHING escapes Marshall's eagle eyes. And there you 
are! 

Vitagraph has enrolled Mile. Hedda Nova, a famous 
Russian actress. Although the lady's name sounds like a 
breakfast food, we are — and she should be — comforted with 
the thought that it might have been far worse. Suppose 
her last name had been Cabbage ! 

Maurice Tourneau, who is producing Maeterlinck's 
"The Blue Bird," says the nude figures in the play will be 
viewed with reverence. Uh, huh ! Wait until those Chi- 
cago censors get a look at 'em ! Why, say, out there they 
even made 'em take the bear out of the Lincoln Park Zoo ! 




PARAMOUNT 



RARTSOOK PHOTO 



Three stars that shine as one. Geraldine Farrar in her boudoir. 



Why I Became a Screen Star 

The Truth About the Much Discussed Advent of a World Famous Singer Into the Movies 

By Geraldine Farrar 



1HAD been an opera singer for over ten years when 
they asked me to go into the movies. I made my 
debut in opera at the age of nineteen at the Royal 
Opera in Berlin. A year later I sang for the Kaiser 
(would it had been a permanent lullaby!) and five years 
later I returned to America to sing at the Occidental shrine 
of music, ihe Metropolitan Opera House. 

In those years the public had been extremely good to 
me. I used to see my name in the press reviews and won- 
der if it was really I about whom such splendid things were 
said. People sent me letters from all over the country, 
and I began to think I was an extremely popular institution. 

And then I went into the movies, and my eyes were 
opened to what popularity really is. It is stupendous, this 
movie game ! I never cease to wonder at its immense 
ramifications, at the enormous possibilities for reaching 
every class of people. The newspaper is a pygmy com- 
pared to it. It is the greatest publicity force in the 
universe. 

It wasn't long after I had finished "Carmen" for the 
pictures that I began to realize that, compared to my 



present public position, I had been, hitherto, a compara- 
tive unknown. Where I got five letters a day from an ap- 
preciative public before, I now received a hundred. Where 
I had received a score or more press notices on operas in 
which I sang, I now received them by the thousands. And 
where I had received a healthy salary for singing, I now 
received — but that cannot be very interesting to you. 

In the course of my career in opera, many things were 
said about me that were not true. In the course of my 
career in the motion pictures, I had been made to say — in 
interviews — many things I had never said at all. So, 
whatever else I say in this article, I am, at least, stating 
the truth. 

You hear people say acting for the screen is not really 
acting, that there can be no art in it. A great many legiti- 
mate players have approached the work in this way, and 
with the big money that is being paid in view, have thought 
only of this, have belittled the work, and have most likely 
failed. But I think screen acting has a technique of its 
own as real and as distinctive as that of the stage. It has 
not been fully developed yet, and as players become 



more expert in the new technique, pictures will become 
finer, more significant. 

We have only scratched the surface, and before we are 
through I believe we will have a screen language that will 
be just as understandable as the language of the spoken 
drama. You know on the stage, in the most dramatic 
scenes, the dialogue is reduced to a minimum. Lines are 
merely a commentary by the players on the situation. 

Even now there are expressions and movements univer- 
sally recognized by audiences as denoting certain element- 
ary emotions, and as players become more skilled the screen 
language will become more complex and expressive, and as 
it does, players will cease mouthing — a ridiculous practice, 
it seems to me. Melodrama abounding in rapid action has 
been the material of the movies, but with the development 
of the new language I believe it is now possible to present 
emotional and psychological dramas in which there is little 
action, with only a minimum use of sub-titles. 

With men like Cecil De Mille, of the Famous Players- 
Lasky Corporation, who thinks deeper and works harder 
than most other directors and is therefore a genius, devel- 
oping the technical end, new effects will be obtained, which 
will put the screen art in the top rank with the other fine 
arts. Mr. De Mille has surrounded himself with a clever 
corps of men who are doing some wonderful things. One 
of them is working on color photography; then I have seen 
in his laboratory some wonderful timings — silver in water, 
sunrise and sunset colors and other effects I am probably 
not supposed to tell about. 

People ask me: "What about the absence of an audi- 
ence to act before? Isn't it hard to work up enthusiasm 
with no one to applaud?" 

There usually is a crowd about when pictures are taken, 
and these people are your audience. Then the actress's 
vanity comes in for its share when she sits out front and 
sees herself act and at the same time watches the audience 
enjoy it — if they do. The picture game is better than the 
legitimate in this — it's a business and not a gamble for the 
actor. You work every day, and if a picture is good it 
goes, and if it is bad it's thrown away. And you don't 
have to wait for the opening, read the papers, count the 
house from night to night, and when the play fails wonder 
what you will do next. 

My parents were both of musical tastes, although neither 
made professional use of their talents. From early child- 
hood my voice gave promise, and I sang at many local en- 
tertainments. When I was twelve years old my father de- 
cided to give me a musical education, although he did not 
look with favor upon professional stage life for women. 
But though he had no professional ambitions for his 
daughter, he did not feel that he was justified in prevent- 
ing her from the career that destiny seemed to have se- 
lected for her. 

After some study in Boston I went to New York, work- 
ing under Emma Thursby; later, I continued her work in 
Washington, D. C. It was in Washington that I first came 
into public notice. At about the time of Dewey's victory 
at Manila Bay I was presented to President and Mrs. Mc- 
Kinley, for whom I sang at the White House. 



I was finally permitted to try my voice before Melba 
and Mr. Ellis, of the Walter Damrosch Opera Company. 
Melba was most enthusiastic in her praise, and Mr. Ellis 
offered $20,000 for four years of work, during which time 
I would have the opportunity to study with Melba. But 
my father insisted upon a refusal of the offer, and also of 
a proposition of $8,000 a year from Grau. 

I then went to Europe, and there, in addition to further 
developing my voice and musical knowledge, began to ac- 
quire foreign languages. Ultimately I made my debut at 
the Royal Opera in Berlin. I was at once put on a three 
years' contract and had the distinction of being the young- 
est singer ever intrusted with the role of Marguerite in 
"Faust" and was the only artist who ever succeeded in 
singing Italian operas in the Italian language at the Berlin 
Opera. 

In rapid succession I appeared in other leading Euro- 
pean musical centers, including Paris, Monte Carlo, Mu- 
nich, Warsaw and Stockholm. In the latter city I was 
decorated by the late King Oscar. When I finally returned 
to the United States to sing in the Metropolitan Opera 
Company in New York, it was after seven years of Euro- 
pean operatic work. 

And then I went into the movies under Jesse L. Lasky 
and Cecil De Mille and the Famous Players-Lasky Corpo- 
ration. My association there has been one of the pleasant- 
est things in my life. No one can appreciate so well as 
the person who joins forces with the Famous Players Com- 
pany what high ideals are theirs and to what extravagant 
lengths they are willing to go to attain those ideals. 

Of my picture roles I believe I like Joan, in "Joan the 
Woman, " the best. I had lots of fun in the Aztec story of 
"The Woman God Forgot," for it appeals to any woman's 
sense of the decorative, and, in addition, it gave splendid 
opportunities for acting. If I were to tell you of the mag- 
nitude of that work done in the studios and in the Yosem- 
ite, it would be a whole story in itself. 

As for "Carmen," which caused more comment in the 
films than all the grand opera Carmens put together, I have 
my own ideas about that girl. 

Carmen is simply the natural woman. She is neither 
moral nor unmoral. She loves Don Jose, the dragoon — for 
a while. Then she tires of him and turns to the more ex- 
citing, the less certain toreador, as naturally as a little girl 
turns from the cake she has sampled and does not care for 
particularly to the unbitten cake still in the paper bag. 
There is no deliberate guile in my Carmen, no practiced 
coquetry. There is no sentiment, only passion; no im- 
morality, only natural woman. 

My Carmen sees a man who attracts her. She takes 
him ruthlessly. When she tires of him, she leaves him 
just as ruthlessly. She sees a piece of cake, she wants it, 
and she takes it. If the cake palls when it is only half 
eaten, she sees no reason why she should go on pretending 
to like it. She has had enough. 



xu^^ds*^ 




The Comments and Criticisms 
of a Free -Lance 

by 
Linda A. Griffith 

(Mrs. David W. Griffith) 

(Editor's Note: The writer, who began her career with the Biograph 
Company, is well known in the moving picture world. Her latest 
success was as star in her own striking sociological play "Charity." 
She is a keen critic and analyst of all that pertains to motion 
picture art, and tells the truth about those who are striving for its 
downfall or its advancement. ) 



CA.MI'1-ELI PHOTO 



"M 



At Last a Super-picture 

"Y OWN UNITED STATES," Anthony Paul 
Kelly's masterful motion picture, proves one 
thing. It proves that history portrayed on the 
screen can be as instructive and as interesting 
as when told in book form by the most learned and inter- 
esting of writers. Mr. Kelly, who compiled the delightful 
scenario of this picture, should turn out more historical 
subjects, for the long-suffering motion picture public is 
parched with thirst for such worth-while material as forms 
the subject matter of "My Own United States." Inciden- 
tally, it was a joy to hear the applause when the author's 
name was flashed on the screen. It has taken many years 
for the neglected author to arrive at the place where ap- 
plause is given him. 

The subject matter of "My Own United States" com- 
prises principally the life and time of Alexander Hamilton, 
Aaron Burr and Lieutenant Phillip Nolan, and so brings in 
that most patriotic and pathetic story of Edward Everett 
Hale, "The Man Without a Country." The screen narra- 
tive opens wi»th a young college chap, a pert, impudent, 
cigarette-smoking youngster of the present day, who thinks 
life is too sweet for him to go to war, whereupon his elderly 
grandparent tells him the story of the lives of Hamilton, 
Burr and the heart-breaking career of Phillip Nolan. When 
the story is finished, the smart youth is a changed boy, has 
found his manhood; he wants to enlist right off. The 
worst slacker could not help but be reborn and want to 
fight for his country should he be told the same story. 

Aside from the most generous praise which the picture 
deserves for its artistry, truthfulness to history, splendid 
characterizations and intelligent acting, it is the best pos- 
sible propaganda for our young men; it cannot fail but in- 
still patriotism in the breast of the most indifferent wher- 
ever it is shown. This photoplay is by far the finest work 
which John W. Noble has ever done. It is commendable 
in the producers that the exact historic locations where the 
main incidents of the story took place were shown, as, for 
instance, the spot in Weehawken where the duel between 
Hamilton and Burr was fought, and the use of the old frig- 
ate Constitution, one of the prize objects of interest of old 



Boston town. Arnold Daly gives a perfect performance of 
both young and old Phillip Nolan. Many eyes grew misty 
during the touching scenes showing Nolan as an old man. 
As he lies in bed, enfeebled with age, and hears news of 
his country, the U. S. A., for the first time in fifty years, 
one's throat ached; it was mighty hard to keep back the 
tears. Nolan's punishment for having said, "Damn the 
United States ! I hope I never hear of the United States 
again !" was that he was put on a vessel and never allowed 
to hear news of his native land. On his death bed he was 
told all that had happened to the United States in those 
years; knowledge of the Civil War was mercifully spared 
him. It was a splendid bit of motion picture acting, but 
the public has come to expect such from Arnold Daly. He 
is not a pretty boy, and he has brains, thank God ! 

The women in the cast were of minor interest, but Anna 
Lehr, as Agnes Churchill, might have made something out 
of a sweet and sympathetic part. She didn't seem to take 
enough interest in her work to costume herself properly or 
even have the wrinkles pressed out of her clothes. Duncan 
McRae, as Alexander Hamilton, and Charles E. Graham, as 
Aaron Burr, gave splendid performances, with artistic 
make-ups; they were perfect types of the characters they 
represented. Sydney Bracy, of "Million Dollar Mystery" 
fame, contributed some excellent work as Captain Rene 
Gautier, besides showing himself an artist at make-up. 

Those whose movie taste does not run to bloodless 
vamps and barefooted baby dolls will enjoy "My Own 
United States." It is a fine, clean, dignified picture, full 
of stirring episodes, interesting bits of history and human 
pathos. The prelude should be shortened and no doubt 
will be. One is apt to get a bit tired before the real story 
begins, and it is too fine a story to allow that to happen. 

Mary Garden Fails To Score 

I had always considered Louis Reeves Harrison one of 
the few fair-minded writers on the movies. If I read 
nothing else in the Motion Picture World, I always read his 
page; but I fail to grasp his review of "Thais." He says: 
" 'Thais,' as an opera, scored a triumph for Mary Garden, 
and 'Thais,' as a visualization, preserves that triumph, in 



that it vividly portrays her strong personality." "Per- 
sonality," Mary Garden certainly has, always did have, 
for she can push even war news off the front page of the 
newspapers, which is some trick these days. A few years 
ago, when Alan Dale was busy with stories about "Our 
Mary" (Miss Garden was called "Our Mary" before little 
Miss Pickford became so known), there was great fear that 
all the dramatic actresses were being shoved into the back- 
ground by one who did not represent drama, but opera. 
This was much resented by lovers of the drama. But Mary 
Garden was entitled to every word of praise, to every glow- 
ing tribute of her dramatic ability. The writer last saw 
her in "Louise," and her acting in the final act of that 
opera would alone establish her as one of the greatest of 
actresses. What strange metamorphosis happened to Mary 
Garden when she appeared before a motion picture camera? 
How had all her tremendous acting ability, her keen dra- 
matic feeling so completely disappeared? Where had it 
gone? Did she feel too cramped to act in the small space 
accorded one on a motion picture stage? Or did the cam- 
era bring her no inspiration such as the crowded Metro- 
politan Opera House offers? 

Mary Garden's movie performance of Thais was abso- 
lutely bloodless and wooden. Was there a fear on her part 
or that of her director that she might not photograph well? 
Was it this that made her movements so consciously 
studied? Was she or her director so concerned about get- 
ting the perfect proportions of her perfect figure that she 
was made to appear quite unsteady on her feet? Why, in 



a screen portrayal of a character, should all the abandon 
that the character has in the original story be eliminated, 
when the actress portraying the character is known to pos- 
sess all the abandon needed for the portrayal and much to 
spare? 

"Thais" pictorially is most artistic. As an example of 
decorative art in the matter of ' ' sets, ' ' assisted by the best 
in photography, the picture is flawless. But that is the 
only virtue the picture has. At a feast in Alexandria, 
Paphnutius points out to Thais in a series of "close-ups" 
the sins of her worldly life. Paphnutius, who was Thais's 
former lover, after an absence of three years, comes back 
to Alexandria as a monk, feeling himself sent by God to 
save the soul of Thais. These close-ups, picturing groups 
of persons at the feast in brief scenes denoting selfishness, 
avarice, passion, jealousy and lust, are strong food for 
babes and show great generosity on the part of the censor. 
Thais is finally convinced, as the most hardened sinner 
could hardly fail to be by this expose of materialism, and 
consents to go with Paphnutius and enter a nunnery. There 
are scenes showing their long and weary travel on foot over 
waste stretches and desert sands to the place where Thais 
is to find soul happiness. In a flimsy chiffon robe, through 
which the cold winds blow cruelly, chilling her bare limbs, 
the fair Thais, accompanied by the monk, journeys forth. 
Perhaps courtesans in those far-off countries and ancient 
times, when they experienced a change of soul, did thus 
costume themselves when on their way to become nuns. I 
do not know whether history could throw much light on 




WILLIAM L. SHEBBILL 



Anna Lehr, as "Agnes Churchill," and Arnold Daly, as "Phillip Nolan," in "My Own United States." 




this detail. But it did appear 
a bit funny to see a prac- 
tically nude woman, with her 
fair hair a-blowing, and her trans- 
parent draperies also a-blowing, 
a la Isadora Duncan's barefoot dancers, ac- 
companied only by a soberly garbed monk, 
wending her world-weary footsteps to a haven 
of spiritual rest. 

"His Mother's Boy" 

Charles Ray, one of the most 
pleasing of the younger movie actors, 
contributes good work to a rather 
long-drawnout motion picture called 
"His Mother's Boy." The scenario 
is from the story of the same name by Rupert 
Hughes. Either the material therein was not 
sufficient for a five-reel picture, or the scenario 
writer fell down on her job, or the director 
went wrong, for the picture is slow, draggy 
and padded. There are too many annoying 
flash-backs to the same scenes to get the neces- 
sary footage. There may be speculative oil 
developments in Texas that are run as the one 
in this picture is shown, but I doubt it. It 
seemed more like the stories that are told of 
the lawless wild life in California when gold 
was first discovered. Of course, each man 



GOLDWYN 



'Paphnutius" the monk, leading "Thais" the 
courtesan into the desert for atonement. 



then was digging gold for him- 
self, and if he wanted to get 
drunk or kill somebody or kill 
himself, that was his own busi- 
ness. I hardly think that even 
the most poorly organized oil 
concern would have a bunch of 
outlaws in charge of its affairs 
such as are shown in "His 
Mother's Boy. " Doris Lee, in 
support of Charles Ray, is 
youthful and sweet, but she 
portrayed too conscious a 
flirt. She would have been 
much more appealing had 
she been simple 
and unaffected. 
Why, with a 
pretty, childlike 
face, does she 
wear her hair in 
a tousled mess 
on the top of her 




PARAMOUNT 



George Beban, 
in ' ' Jules of 
the Strong Heart" 



head? It reminded one of the 
snakes of Medusa. Lydia Knott 
delineates a mother with sympathy 
and sincerity. The picture is 
mostly interesting because of the 
clean-cut acting of Charles Ray. 
His personality is delightful. 

Beban Never Disappoints 

"Jules of the Strong Heart," a 
Lasky production, brings once 
more to the screen, in a story of 
the Canadian woods, that sterling 
actor, George Beban. Beban never 
disappoints his audience, for no 
matter whether his story be weak 
or strong, the charm of his person- 
ality, his clever characterizations 
and his genuine ability make up 
for any defect the story may have. 
Most of Beban's work in "Jules 
of the Strong Heart" is with a 
joyful baby, and the pretty scenes 
between the rough Jules and the 
youngster brought many a chuckle 
from the audience. The human 
note was always there. The pic- 
ture is laid in a wooded country 
of great beauty, and the logging 
scenes, where the giant trees were 
felled and sent down a chute to the 
■water, were of much interest. The 
picture was well directed and the 



PARAMOUNT 



Charles Ray, as ' 'Matthew Denton, ' 'and Doris 
Lee, as "Mabel G I enny," follow the old trail. 



wins earnest 

C e le stial 

support for 

his fo nndling . 

photography was of fine quality. 
It was cheering to see Beban in a 
story with a happy ending. It 
would have been too cruel, after 
he gives the baby back to its 
father, had he not been rewarded 
in the end by winning the girl he 
loved. He deserved her. 

Animal Stars in the Movies 

The Paramount-Mack Sennett 
comedies, to judge by two recent 
releases, are all that might be 
expected from this strong combi- 
nation. These two particularly 
clever pictures are "The Kitchen 
Lady," with Louise Fazenda, and 
"Taming Target Center," with 
Polly Moran. In the former the 
real star of the picture was a clever 
comedy cat, and the cat's support 
principally a comedy fish. A clever 
young grizzly bear completed the 
list of star animal actors that put 
the humans quite in the shade. 
There was one scene that brought 
something new to filmdom. The 
cat, sitting alongside a topless 
glass tank in which live fish were 
swimming about, carelessly lets 
his tail touch the water, where- 
upon the fish seizes the cat's tail 
in its mouth. The cat unsuc- 




m 



(At right, oval) 
Roscoe (Fatty) 
Arbuckle, having 
a perfectly ducky 
time, in "A Coun- 
try Hero, "his first 

California play. 

cessfully tries to 
shake off the fish, 
then jumps to the 
floor, the fish still 
holding on as they 
rush from room to 
room. The close-ups 
of the cat's expres- 
sion brought gales of 



PARAMOUOT-ARBUCKLE 



-~r 




=S§3 



PARAMOUNT-.SENNKTT 



This bit of rustic camouflage is from the comedy, "His Hidden Purpose," and is 
one of the Sennett Beauty Brigade wishing somebody would get her goat. 



(Silhouettes, left 
and right) 
Louise Fazenda 
makes able comedy 
support of a nim- 
ble cat and a high- 
brow fish. 

laughter from the 
audience, as did his 
comedy walk with 
pieces of mucilaged 
paper sticking to his 
four feet. Louise 
Fazenda did brave 
work with the young 
bear on her back, the 
animal hugging her 
almost to death. She 
is a mighty clever 
comedian, but the 
cast of animal actors 
nearly beat her to it. 
Douglas Fairbanks 
now has a rival — a 
woman. She does all 
the daring stunts 




that he does. Now, if she only had his smile and would 
tone down the vulgar touches, a new comedy star would 
twinkle in the movie heavens — a star of first magnitude. 
In ' ' Taming Target Center' ' Polly Moran does exception 
ally clever work and pulls off some reckless tricks. 

"The Last Leaf" 

It is quite refreshing to see a good story, well directed 
and well acted and without a much advertised star, as hap- 
pens in O. Henry's story, "The Last Leaf," a Broadway 
Star Feature. The movie version of this pathetic story of 
O. Henry's preserves quite faithfully the sensitiveness and 
delicacy of the author's narrative. The direction was in 
the capable hands of Ashly Miller. The cast (Behrman, 
Bernard Siegel; Sue, Mildred Manning; Johanna, Patsy de 
Forest) brought the O. Henry flavor to their individual in- 
terpretations. Patsy de Forest, as Johanna, was particu- 
larly appealing. She played with much feeling. Mildred 
Manning was a bit too conscious, rather camera-wise. Ber- 
nard Siegel, as Behrman, deserves commendation for good 
work. 

Couldn't Get a Drink 

An amusing incident is told as having taken place dur- 
ing the filming of former Ambassador James W. Gerard's 
book, ' ' My Four Years in Germany. ' ' Some exterior scenes 
were being photographed over in Jersey. The day was a 
cold one, and the actors in their costumes were thoroughly 
chilled at the end of their work. It seems that three of 
them, representing the Kaiser, Hindenburg and Von Tirpitz 
in full war regalia, entered a small cafe and asked for a 
drink. The barkeep, a true son of Ireland, refused them. 
The actors insisted on their drink, but the only words the 
barkeep uttered were : "I have me orders from the govern- 
ment to serve no one in uniform, and ye'll git no drink 
here." Entreaties, expostulations were all in vain, and 
the cold, tired actors had to retire to their frigid dressing- 
room, remove make-up, and dress without any inner warmth 
to sustain them. Why should any actor interpreting the 
Kaiser, Hindenburg or Von Tirpitz expect a barkeep to 
serve him with a drink, even when engaged in the worthy 
occupation of interpreting for the screen the splendid story 
of our esteemed James W. Gerard? 



APKDA PHOTO 



May Allison in all-season attire — a Jack Frost 
suit and a springtime smile. 



The Age of Reason 

Jimmy giggled when the teacher read the story of the 
Roman who swam across the Tiber three times before 
breakfast. 

"You do not doubt that a trained swimmer could do 
that, do you, Jimmy?" the teacher demanded. 

"No, ma'am," answered Jimmy. "But I wondered 
why he didn't make it four times and get back to the side 
his clothes were on." 

Possibly 

First girl (watching Bill Sykes mop the floor with Nancy 
in "Oliver Twist") — I just wouldn't stand for that ! I'd 
leave him the first chance I got ! 

Second girl (dryly) — Maybe she thinks it's better to be 
loved and bossed than not to be loved at all. 




' ' A Close Resemblance ' ' afforded Mr. and Mrs. Drew the best possible opportunity for working out their 
theory that we must laugh together, not at each other, to obtain the humor that is a balm to the heart, and 

not a hurt. 



Film Humor More Than Making Funny Faces 

The Human Note, Not Monkey- Shines, Makes the Strongest, Most Lasting Appeal 

By SIDNEY DREW 



FILM humor more than making faces? Why, of 
course it is ! All genuine humor on the screen, as 
well as on the stage, is due not so much to violent 
action or extravagant facial expression as it is to 
inference. The fun of the thing is the result of the situa- 
tion itself, and the situation can be neither expressed nor 
understood without a certain amount of intelligence. A 
monkey's face may be funny, but it means nothing; con- 
sequently, it is not humorous. 

My own view of film humor, naturally, is that 
of the wholesome, cleanly public I try to interest. 
And I contend that the general public is whole- 
some and cleanly, and that it is not necessary 
to hit people with a metaphorical brick in 
order to make them laugh. They will 
laugh at the whimsical foibles of themselves 
and their neighbors as shown in kindly, 
friendly guise on the screen. They will 
laugh the more sincerely at something that 
is real than at something that is plainly a 
figment of the imagination. 

I want to acknowledge right here that 
the reason for any success I may have 
achieved in this line is due solely to the 
cleanly mind that did me the honor, about 
four years ago, to become part of my busi- 
ness as well as of my social life. Being 
trained in the tradition of the theater, I 
probably, if left to myself, should have 
thought along theatric lines in my screen 



Sidney Drew 
"as is." 



work ; in other words, I might have drawn upon my 
imagination. Mrs. Drew, having lived a non-theatric 
life, saw things in their real relationships and con- 
vinced me that, as screen material, real life itself is 
much more human and appealing than any fiction could 
possibly be. It is upon that assumption, that belief, that 
the Metro-Drew comedies have been built and to which any 
success they may have had is due. 

Film humor of the sort I am discuss- 
ing, the kind that springs from the 
oddities of family life and real human 
nature, may not be as profitable as some 
others, but at least the producers of it can 
look themselves in the face and retain 
their self-respect. And as self-respect 
seems to me the primary consideration in 
ife, I hope to continue to present the style 
of comedy or humor or film fun that I have 
been, through the courtesy of Metro, per- 
mitted to portray. 

Anyone who has at heart the best interests 
of his profession, art or business — whichever 
he chooses to call it — does not care to make the 
injudicious laugh and the judicious grieve. 
Film humor will not be the less genuine be- 
cause it keeps its standards high. Those who 
attend performances of this brand of humor 
can refer without shame to the foolish but 
cleanly traits they may have seen sketched 
upon the screen the night before. 





The supporting cast in late Drew comedies in- 
cludes Bobby Connolly, juvenile star. 

After all, we can't escape the fact that we're all human, 
and it is the humanity of us, rather than the monkey-shines, 
that makes the most lasting appeal. The best humor, like 



the best art in all other forms, gives the keenest pleasure. 
Film humor means life in its quainter aspects translated in 
terms of the screen. Humor, we are told, is distinguished 
from wit by greater sympathy, geniality and pleasantry. 
Therefore, we must laugh together, not at each other, to 
obtain the humor that is a balm to the heart and not a hurt. 
Not only is film humor more than making faces; from 
my point of view it does not consist at all in making faces. 
Humor, like other forms of art, consists in holding the 
mirror up to Nature, the only difference being that we do 
not always allow Nature to dress for dinner; we sometimes 
catch her with kimono on and hair in curl papers, when 
she expects to see no one more important than the iceman. 
On the other hand, some people are just as funny in even- 
ing clothes as others are before breakfast. The principal 
thing, after all, about film humor is to recognize it when 
you see it. You must have a sense of humor before you 
can have a sense of film humor. The producer must rec- 
ognize a humorous idea in a manuscript or in real life, 
must know how to develop it after having seen it, and must 
be capable of registering that humor on the screen. And 
sometimes he also needs a sense of humor when he watches 
his finished product on the screen. There are many 
humorous angles to film humor, and no one needs a sense 
of humor to appreciate all these angles more than the film 
humorist himself. 






If this scene between Clara Kimball Young and Captain Robert Warwick occurred in "A House of Glass, ' ' 

it undoubtedly caused comment in the neighborhood. 




Corinne Grant and Hillarie Stephanie, crystal gazing, are astounded when the magic glass reveals the deluge 
of gold at their benefit performance at Long Beach for the English ambulance fund. 





Eulalie 

Jensen; 
lace overdress. 



wrap 



Clothes — A Vital Theme 

By NORMA TALMADGE 



A 



Kathleen Clifford; "Tickle-toe' 
dancing frock. 



WOMAN in the wrong clothes is a9 dis 
illusioning as salted coffee or eggnog 
without the nog. She may be a com- 
bination of all the virtues, but if her 
lack the harmony of her soul, first impressions 
be damning. And more so than all other women 
the actress have to prepare for those first impressions, 
even to a greater degree is the screen star forced to 
her sartorial settings. For on the stage, be it boards 
screen, the player is on show, and whereas the lead 
woman of a Broadway production may change her 
during the season, her co-worker of the films is com- 
pelled to wear the same old things to the end of the reel. And 
the reel may reel along for a year or so. Moreover, aside 
from the long run that a picture may have, its release is often 
postponed for weeks after completion, and if one depended on 
the shop showings at the time of rehearsal, the costuming would 
often be hopelessly out of date. 

For that reason it is imperative that the frocks for a screen 
production be selected far in advance of the current styles. 
One is forced to cultivate a sort of sixth sense. For instance, 
when I see a baby-frill around the edge of a belt in May, I 




Alice Brady; for the tea dan 




Jean Calhoun; 1 
"Beatrice" model. 




trma Talmadge; Kolinsky throw. 



strongly suspect the presence of a full-grown tunic in 
December, and hoops in June mean nothing 
less than a barrel next year. But after 
depending on that extra sense, going 
ahead on its conclusions and laying out a wardrobe as dif- 
ferent from everyday things as beans are from cats, I 
invariably grow panicky over the results, and not until I 
see the play on the screen do I feel reassured and ready 
to try again. I do believe, furthermore, that a woman 
must have the feel of artistic gowning in her make-up be- 
fore she can correctly forecast and sense instinctively not 
only combinations in accordance with good taste, but 
the trend of Dame Fashion's vagarious fancies. 

Another thing that must be carefully considered by 
the film star in selecting hats and gowns is color tints 
and combinations. The average outsider knows nothing 
whatever of the subtle distinctions to be obtained by cer- 
tain colors under the photographic lens — the fact that red 
photographs absolutely black, and pale blue a poor white, 
while other colors change their identity as confusingly. Cos- 
tuming for the screen must be worked out in conjunction with the 
color schemes of the various interiors, and strong blacks and 
whites, shadings and gradations of tone are planned for com- 
position effects. 

When I figure on a new story, clothes always play a tremendous 

(Continued in advertising section) 





TRIANGLE 



Iris Ashton; 
Aurora Leigh" model. 




Jean 

Calhoun; 

wisteria op 

era cloak. 




Kathleen Clifford; "Tickle-toe" 
dancing frock. 



WOMAN in the wrong clothes is as 
illusioning as salted coffee or eggnog 
without the nog. She may be a com- 
bination of all the virtues, but if her 
lack the harmony of her soul, first impressions 
be damning. And more so than all other women 
the actress have to prepare for those first impressions, 
even to a greater degree is the screen star forced to 
her sartorial settings. For on the stage, be it boards 
screen, the player is on show, and whereas the lead- 
woman of a Broadway production may change her 
during the season, her co-worker of the films is com- 
pelled to wear the same old things to the end of the reel. And 
he reel may reel along for a year or so. Moreover, aside 
from the long run that a picture may have, its release is often 

n:; i ^t2r m rr an , d if one depended ° n 
o^n b^ope.rr:::^ rehearsai - the costuming *° uid 

prod^:r b ri:^ d is ;r erat r that *? frocks for a screen 

One is forr-ri ♦ , adVanCe of the curre "t styles. 

when Is e a II TT * ">" * *** ***■ For ™ -e, 
see a baby-f rill around the edge of a ^ ^ ^ ^ 




SELECT . 

Alice Brady;pr 



the tea 



j0#- N °rmaTalmadg< 



strongly suspect the presence of a full-grown tunic in 
December, and hoops in June mean nothing 
less than a barrel next year. But after 
depending on that extra sense, going 
ahead on its conclusions and laying out a wardrobe as dif- 
ferent from everyday things as beans are from cats, I 
invariably grow panicky over the results, and not until I 
see the play on the screen do I feel reassured and ready 
to try again. I do believe, furthermore, that a woman 
must have the feel of artistic gowning in her make-up be- 
fore she can correctly forecast and sense instinctively not 
only combinations in accordance with good taste, but 
the trend of Dame Fashion's vagarious fancies. 

Another thing that must be carefully considered by 
the film star in selecting hats and gowns is color tints 
and combinations. The average outsider knows nothing 
whatever of the subtle distinctions to be obtained by cer- 
tain colors under the photographic lens— the fact that red 
photographs absolutely black, and pale blue a poor white, 
while other colors change their identity as confusingly. Cos- 
tuming for the screen must be worked out in conjunction with the 
color schemes of the various interiors, and strong blacks and 
whites, shadings and gradations of tone are planned for com- 

position effects. 

When I figure on a new story, clothes always play a tremendous 

/■Continued in advertisina section) 
Kolinsky throw. 




Iris Ashton; 
"Aurora Leigh" model. 




Fannie Ward, star in "Innocent," a very beautiful film version of the Broadway success of like name staged 
by A. H. Woods. This shows Miss Ward somewheres East of Suez — and Los Angeles. 




This isn't a pose, but a favorite pastime with Mae Marsh in her hours of leisure. It is her 
belief that she inhales inspiration along with the fragrance of the blossoms she loves. 



Smiles on the Screen — and Tears 

Some Charming Confessions and a Self - Analysis by a Popular Star 

By Mae Marsh 



OF ALL persons before the screen public to-day, no 
one is less qualified to expatiate on theory or 
technique than I, for I have none of the latter, 
and of the former I can say nothing new. So it 
was a large order that Film Fun gave when the editor 
asked me to tell how I build up and register joy and sorrow 
for the camera. 

I don't "build up" at all; I just am ! Whatever I do is 
spontaneous, with no question of acting behind it. This 
may sound unconvincing, or it may seem that I am trying 
to prove my superiority to rules of acting by which others 
have achieved success. That is not my meaning. I have 
simply found that my best medium of expression comes 
through the heart — the mind, I suppose it is — and whatever 
outward expression I give to my inner feelings must be for 
me the true method of self-expression. 

I do not suppose the screen would have me at all had I 
been obliged to express myself in conventional ways. But 
from the first Mr. D. W. Griffith did not hamper me, but 
brought out whatever I was capable of expressing in my 



own way. He did not teach me to act, when he saw me 
that day sitting dejectedly in the yard of the studio at Los 
Angeles— that is, to act according to any formula. With 
infinite patience he brought to the surface my emotions, 
and when they found expression in symbols quite different 
from what he expected, he let me go on and be myself. 
Mr. Griffith encouraged me in this. No one else would 
have done so, for my hysterical laughter and staccato ges- 
tures often were quite opposed to the emotion I was sup- 
posed to be portraying. 

Once again it must be made clear that I do not consider 
myself a "revolutionary force" in acting or anything as 
awesome as that. My way of acting before the camera is, 
I think, natural. It is the real Me. Whatever value it 
may have must come from that. 

Often I have been asked how I "put over" pathos in the 
face of the difficulties known to exist in all studio work. 
Never having faced an audience in my life and never hav- 
ing spoken a word in public, it is as curious to me when I 
see a stage player revealing an emotional crisis right out 



/ 



in front of a packed house as it is for the artist of the 
theater who wonders how we of the studio can act without 
spectators. 

It is not hard — when you have done ^ 

it a great deal. That is why — to go 
back to Mr. Griffith — I owe every- 
thing to that master of acting. 
It was hard for me, a bashful, 
awkward girl, to do anything 
before anybody except the 
mirror in my room. But he 
made me feel that no one \ 

was looking at me but him- 
self, and my only thought 
in facing him was to do X 

my utmost. 

When the scenario is 
placed in my hands, I read it 
hurriedly, impatient to see 
how it is going to end. I do 
not think of myself in the char 
acter allotted to me. The story as a 
whole makes the deepest impression. 
Then I read it again, carefully. Now 
the individual scenes and episodes be- 
gin to take form in my mind, and I 
visualize my part in detail, but still 
with no plan of what I shall do to embody the part with 
my personality. In fact, that does not trouble me at all 
until I face the camera's eye and listen to my director. 
Then, of course, I go to work. 

We rehearse a scene many times, with each repetition 
giving it added life and reality. I try to build up the 
character when I play her, not by theorizing when I read 
about her in the scenario. Inspirations come to me as she 
takes on life, and very gradually I begin to feel that she is 
living, that I am submerged in her. Before the camera 



GOLOWVN 



The original of this would make the 
grouchiest father love her. 



begins finally to click, I have forgotten myself entirely in 

the girl I am trying to be. But this is not telling how I 

register pathos, is it? 

"" " --^ Frankly, I don't know how I project 

x pathos into the orb of the camera ! I 

just do, if you say I do. 

I suppose it is, first of all, 
because I am sympathetic. I 
do feel the role, not through 
a vivid imagination nor a 
morbid desire to suffer and 
to show suffering, but be- 
cause it never is hard for 
me to feel for others. 
Those who know me away 
from the studios are not in 
doubt about this, and I hope 
those who know me only in 
the silent drama feel no less 
doubt of my sympathetic qual- 
ities. The hopes, fears and troubles 
of my friends become my own, and un- 
til their difficulties are solved they re- 
main my worries, too. This, more 
than anything else, is the basis of my 
pathos as it is disclosed on the screen. 
After all, it is my own heart, I sup- 
pose, that enables me to tell my roles to "have a heart. " 

If others care for me as Marjorie Caner, in "The Cin- 
derella Man," trying to make my grouchy father love me, 
or when I am Mary Garland, in ' ' The Beloved Traitor, ' ' 
struggling to save my sweetheart from himself, it is really 
because they 
see the real 




JRi H1LD PHOTO 




An Easterner in the Golden West 

How the Big Open-air Life of California Has Won the Affections of One Movie Actor 

By William Russell 



IT WAS five o'clock — in the morning. The sun had 
already made an investigating pilgrimage of the 
ranch, and by the time it reached me and the pear 
tree, under which I had placed my bed the night be- 
fore, it probably had decided that a stranger in "them 
there parts" should at least be up, if not doing, by that 
time. And the way that old, golden ball of daylight must 
have laughed to himself — if the sun ever can be said to 
crack itself into mirth — when a pear directly in the 
branches above me said good-by to its moorings and 
splashed its juiciness all over my features! 

And that was my first awakening in California. 

It was somewhat different from opening one's eye in a 



Riverside apartment and coming leisurely back into the 
consciousness of a new day, amid the old and constant con- 
glomeration of sounds that are simply "New York" ; and 
then the tap at the door that bespoke the arrival of the 
morning mail, borne by the colored mammy, Fanny, who 
invariably asked: 

"Will yo' have a HI' oatmeal this mornin', Mas' Rus- 
sell?" And, as on every morning of the preceding five 
years, I would answer: 

"Yes, Fanny, I think I will have some this morning." 

But evidently the California way was not that of the 

conservative Fanny, and as I washed the fragments of pear 

from eyes and ears, I debated sadly with myself as to 




William Russell joined joyfully in the laugh the film folks gave him when his bean crop, which he figured 

would help a lot in winning the war, failed and was a total loss. He has the farm yet, and 

the habit, and is sure that concentration will bring about a great 1918 yield. 



whether or not I would care for the forcible sort of life my 
first awakening seemed to predict for me. 

However, I had concentrated myself into a California 
ranch, and there I intended to stay and make some of my 
dreams of ranch life come true. For one year I had deter- 
mined on the bliss of living in the California out-of-doors, 
so in February, 1915, I found myself in the State of my 
dreams, with a contract in my pocket to work at the Amer- 
ican Film studios in Santa Barbara. On the day I arrived 
I found a ranch not far from the studio, leased it, moved 
my bed out under the pear tree — and I felt that ranch life 
for me had begun. 

With three years of it back of me, I wouldn't exchange 
it for life in the East again under any circumstance that 
my fancy can conjure. 

One of the California enjoyments which Eastern visit- 
ors particularly like is the mountain barbecue, and there is 
no place like Santa Barbara for holding one. There were 
thirty of us at the last one I arranged. We left the ranch 
on horseback and rode over devious, narrow trails, passed 
unsuspected waterfalls, skirted a gypsy camp, and came 
out on a point known as the Grand Vista and from which 
we looked down on all of Santa Barbara, with the Santa 
Cruz Islands plainly visible across twenty-three miles of 
ocean. 

While my guests were still enthralled with the view, 
and before they could realize that scenery, as food, is not 
altogether filling, I led the way down a mile of back trail. 
Before the site of the barbecue was reached, there came to 
us the aroma of coffee, then the sound of sizzling meat, 
and a widening of the trail showed several fires, with a 



man busy at each, turning steaks over broilers on the hot 
coals. 

We got back to the ranch about eight o'clock at night, 
and though we had been in the saddle most of the day and 
the majority of my guests were not used to this variety of 
exercise, yet the victrola and Sherry Hall at the piano 
alternated in supplying the dance music. 

My company surprised me. with a party on one of my 
birthdays and presented me with a picnic box which straps 
onto the back of my car. It contains every variety of 
utensil usable on a camping trip. That box has gone with 
me on many journeys into the mountains, where, with a 
number of scripts and a gun, I have lost myself for days 
at a time, returning with a story all mapped out for pro- 
duction and with mountain game for my studio companions. 

The fall of the year is to me the most fascinating time 
in California. It is then the mountain fires rage, and 
while they are terrific, fearsome things, there is about 
them a majesty that awes and that makes one brave dan- 
gers which in calmer moments would seem impossible. 
Last fall the worst fires the country has known in years 
burned for days through the canyons and mountains. For 
two nights every man fought the scourge, carrying families 
to safety and digging trenches to check the fires' advance. 

While there is everything about life in the West to 
make it different from that of New York and the existence 
which a majority of us coast film folk have been used to, 
yet the life in the studio goes on about the same. The 
studio at Santa Barbara is as beautiful and picturesque as 
is this town of leisure millionaires itself. Work begins 

(Continued in advertising section) 




CHAPLIN -LAUDER 



Ten million dollars' worth oj personality — Harry Lauder and Charlie Chaplin. These soul-twins of 
comedy are the highest priced entertainers that have ever appeared on the screen. 




...:.. 



The old, old lure of beauty. 



Under its spell the monk "Paphnutius' 
folly, and the dregs, sorrow. 



drinks the cup the froth of which is 



Thais the Woman That Preys 

A Clever Analysis of a Great Historical Character 
By Mary Garden 



«rpi 



IHAIS, the Eternal Vampire." I should not have 
objected if the scenario editor had decided to 
expand the title of my first screen play in that 
manner. Thais is the vampire. And the vam- 
pire is as eternal as woman. 

More than eight hundred times I have sung the part of 
the Alexandrian courtesan in Massenet's opera, and each 
time it has been with the added conviction that Thais was 
a very bad sort — and yet like every other woman, in one 
way or another. For Thais to me is the drama of life and 
death. She is woman as we know her to-day. She is 
woman as woman has always been. 

Thais is essentially the predatory female, using her 
physical attractions to gain those ends which dwarf her 
soul. She is, in the parlance of the cinema I have grown 
so to love, a ' ' vamp. ' ' 

Call it what you will, the motives and the actions of 
the Alexandrian are those of the inscrutable feminine. 
She knows what she wants, and she gets it by means of 
what the gods have given her. She becomes wily, a great 
schemer, using her body always as her weapon, so nicely 
gauging her favors that she knows precisely what a glance 
will command for her. 

Thais, like others of her type, does not exploit her 
beauty without becoming debauched in soul. She cannot 
refrain from using to the utmost the force within her to 
bring her luxury upon luxury — always the demands of the 
carnal-minded. Flesh never is satisfied, and Thais is in- 
gulfed in the sin which makes the Egyptian city a place of 
pestilence. 

In playing this infamous woman before the camera, I 
feel that she is the last word in the history of the cinema 
vampire — not because she is recreated through me, but be- 
cause she is the primitive and ultimate woman of prey. 
In the opera the music of Massenet aids yet restrains me. 
Any musical accompaniment must necessarily serve as a 



restraint to the artist who knows a character as I know my 
Thais and as I want the public to know her. 

She regards her body as a supreme gift of the gods she 
worships. In the sleeping soul of the pagan there is no 
thought of wrong as we know it. Eros is her chief deity, 
and to the god of passion she dedicates herself. 

In my many conferences with M. Anatole France, 
author of the history of Thais which serves as libretto for 
the opera and the' basis of the scenario, we analyzed the 
character of this extraordinary personality. Her sway in 
golden Alexandria lasted for many, many years, and always 
she was the creature who preyed. She did it with finesse 
— Thais was ever the arbiter of correct form in social life 
— and with never a false note. Indeed, she was really be- 
loved of the common people, as she was by her lovers. 
She gave liberally to charity, helped people in distress and 
was capable of genuine sacrifice. This bears out my con- 
tention that there is no such thing as the conventional 
"bad" woman. The moral laws which Thais broke were 
not laws at all to her. She really was serving her gods, 
not paying them secret tribute. 

Thais is not dead. She lives to-day. More than one 
Thais sees herself in the opera and on the screen, and to 
such women the coming of Thais' s moment of awakening 
will, I earnestly hope, show them that the glories of the 
flesh are forgotten in the ecstasy of the soul's rebirth. If 
it were not for the spiritual significance of the character, 
the vampire's story would hardly be more than a pageant 
of passion. And that is not life as we know it and live it. 







C ^^^ff^ 




CHARLOTTE FAIBCHILH TIIOTO 



Norma Talmadge in one of life's perfect moments. The gown was created from her own design, to be worn in 
"Ghosts of Yesterday." Fit and fabrics are equally fine, and the picture was posed by an artist gifted with 

understanding. 







B^jjjffiw^^r ■:■■■" * IB 


^ 








S^JSl, .j"- v Jv 


''■^PP^^^^I 


W ■■■ - ^^ 


^^ y*"* 38 





BROWN BROTHERS PHOTO 



Two hearts that beat as one — above the clouds. 

To the Studio by Aerial -Taxi 

Personal Narrative of the Screen Player Who Was Wooed and Won in the Air 

By Winifred Allen 

(Mrs. Lawrence B. Sperry) 



SOMETHING simply had to be done. I had been held 
up for hours and hours, just going from New York 
down to Garden City. It nearly drove me frantic. 
Before this awful war made all this confusion, the 
trip- was a matter of moments; now it isn't worth while to 
start unless one has all the time there is, for he is certain 
to be delayed, nobody can even guess how long. 

But there is this much to be said in favor of those hours 
we were delayed out in those dreary, snow-covered, stubble 
fields, waiting for we knew not what: they set me think- 
ing. And when I really pin my mind down to the solution 
of a problem, I never give up until I have solved it. The 
question in this case was how to get where I want to go 
without delay. The answer is — but wait a little bit and 
let me tell you all about it. 

We were a particularly jolly house party that week-end 
at the home of Mrs. N. W. Dalton. There were about 
twenty of us, but the only ones who helped me reach the 
great conclusion as to the proper way to travel were Mrs. 
Reid and Lieutenant Lawrence B. Sperry. He has been 



flying for the past eight years and is now in Uncle Sam's 
service with the U. S. Naval Aviation Corps, but Sunday is 
a free day for him. 

We had been skating, ice boating, and having a lot of 
fun, and then Mr. Sperry wanted to know if any of us 
wanted to go for a flight. I had always been wild to ride 
in an aeroplane and just couldn't contain myself with glee 
when they hoisted me into the machine and belted me into 
the rear seat. Mrs. Reid sat in front. I was exiled to the 
tail seat because I am a lightweight. 

We were all bundled up in fur-lined aviation suits — 
mine was about six sizes too large for me — with helmet 
and goggles. 

Someone gave the word, the engine snorted, sputtered, 
and finally settled down to a steady roar. 

Then my confidence began to wane. Someone said: 
"Don't be nervous; relax. The sensation won't be nearly 
so bad if you relax." Then we began to rise and were 
gaining speed, so I gritted my teeth and — relaxed? 
(Continued in advertising section) 




Moonv PHOTO 



It takes a person of daring, devoid of fear. Here's proof that Mrs. Sperry can qualify under these requirements. 








£ 



^i 



i.- *-*»* * 




SAIIONAL FILM CORP. 



(Insert) "Tarzan's" farewell to the ape "Kala," the only mother he has ever known, slain by an enemy's arrow. 

The jungle picture shows the brethren and comrades of'Tarzan." 

A Genuine Jungle Story 

"Tarzan of the Apes,"" a Wild Life Romance, Foreshadows New Screen Possibilities 

By Elizabeth Lang Foy 



THE POPULARITY of this picture is another dem 
onstration of the fact that the "call of 
the wild" finds ready response from 
the majority of us. There is 
diversity of opinion regarding the cli- 
max, but that the filming of this most 
unusual story was a worthy enterprise 
seems the unanimous verdict. 

Most of us have read the story. 
A man in earliest infancy was adopted 
by a family of apes and reared by 
them in the wilderness, in absolute 
ignorance of what we know as humanity 
and civilization. Ultimately he wins back 
his birthright. Necessarily two actors had 
to play the part of the hero. Gordon Grif- 
fith, as the youth, does wonderful work, par- 
ticularly in the scene where as an adventur- 




KATIOKAL FILM CORP. 



Tarzan" guards the tree- 
top couch. 



ous boy he breaks into the cabin in which he was born 
and in which lie the telltale skeletons of father 
and mother. These he disregards as not un- 
usual incidents of life as he knows it; but 
his play with the juvenile picture-books 
his mother had provided was as fine and 
understanding a bit of acting as could be. 
The spirit of boyhood animated him 
throughout his part of the performance. 
But, of course, the heavy work is 
done by Elmo Lincoln, as Tarzan come 
to man's estate. It was admirable 
throughout — repressed in scenes where the 
man's mind fumbles with problems for 
which ape training finds him unprepared, but 
elsewhere bold and free. The scene where 
Tarzan holds in his arms the dying Kala, 
the only mother he has known, is gripping. 



Who's Who and Where 



You will not need to be told Who's 
Who on the cover of this very special 
number of Film Fun. Norma Tal- 
madge posed for it on one of the busy 
days which intervened between the com- 
pletion of her latest picture and her de- 
parture for a much needed rest at Palm 
Beach, Fla. She did it because we asked 
her to. We asked the favor because we 
believed there was nobody you would 
like better to see than this beautiful 
and popular player. 

The portrait is the work of Lou 
Mayer, who is as favorably known and 
well beloved in the art world as Miss 
Talmadge is on the screen. All those 
little tricks and charms of dress and 
manner which, summed up, constitute 
personality, he has fixed on the canvas 
in such happy fashion that the picture 
might well be called "The Spirit of 
Spring." 

«?- 

The Universal Screen Magazine is run- 
ning a Food Conservation Serial. One 
of the first episodes presents May Irwin 
as a star cook, making toothsome war 
bread. The ingredients are a flour 
blended of wheat, oats, cornmeal, rye, 
barley and bran. Honey is used in- 
stead of sugar, vegetable oil instead of 
animal fat (lard) ; salt, water and yeast 
are the only items used as heretofore. 
The whole process is shown in the film, 
and incidentally it demonstrates an- 
other helpful accomplishment of this 
favorite fun-maker, for the honey used 
in her war bread is the product of Miss 
Irwin's own apiary at her home on one 
of the Thousand Islands. 



Captain Vernon Castle, of the Royal 
Flying Corps, who suffered but one 
slight wound during two years of con- 
stant service in the air for the Allies 
over the German lines, came to his 
death on February 15th, at Fort Worth, 
Tex. He was killed in avoiding a col- 
lision with another machine, to escape 
which Captain Castle took the upward 
flight at such an angle that his engine 
died and his machine crashed to earth, 
burying him in the wreckage. Com- 
radely hands extricated him quickly, 
but he never regained consciousness 
and died at the post hospital twenty 
minutes after the fall. The work he 
was doing for America as an instructor 
to the flying forces was said to be as 



spectacular and arresting to his com- 
rades on these fields, where aeroplanes 
are as thick as swarming bees, as the 
dancing figures that first made him 
famous used to be. Not only his com- 
rades of the service but hosts of friends 
among film folks feel his untimely tak- 
ing as a personal sorrow. Heartfelt 
sympathy for his wife, Irene Castle, is 
universal. 

«?- 

The shuttling back and forth across 
the continent this month includes the 
establishment of Charles Chaplin in his 
own studios at Hollywood, Cal., where 
he is at work on the first of his produc- 
tions for the Exhibitors' Circuit. A 
regular exodus of stars from the New 
York studios of Pathe has occurred. 
Frank Keenan, Bessie Love and Fan- 
nie Ward have gone for an indefinite 
stay in the land where the sun favors 
camera work. Gail Kane left shortly 
before Valentine's Day on a hurry call 
for the West and has promised to send 
interesting particulars on her arrival. 
Edgar Lewis, producer of "The Bar- 
rier,"" Bar Sinister' ' and other notable 
features, has arrived on the coast and 
will make several productions there. 
-?- 

Captain Alan Campbell, whose death 
on the Flanders front was reported a 
few weeks ago, was the son of Mis. 
Patrick Campbell, the great English 
actress. He was at one time a screen 
actor with Vitagraph, in the company 
of Sidney Drew, but at the outbreak of 
the war he returned home and enlisted 
in September, 1914, as a private. 
-?~ 

Here's a new instance of the way pic- 
ture producers use up money for pub- 
licity. The most expensive business 
card so far as known is in use by John 
H. English, publicity editorfor Diando 
Films, Glendale, Cal. It is a fresh- 
laid egg, with his name and business 
address on it. Now if on'y New York 
publicity men will adopt this fashion ! 

-?- 
You will notice that we have made a 
number of changes and have adopted 
some new fashions, as is appropriate at 
Eastertime. We hope and believe you 
will enjoy this issue of Film Fun, and 
we can promise - for the material is 
already in hand — that the May number 
will be even better. 



BIG THINGS AT STAKE REQUIRE 
BIG THINGS TO BE DONE. 

THERE are 2,500,000 human lives at stake in Armenia, 
Syria and Palestine; 400,000 of them are orphans. 
They are the hope of the future of the Near East. 
They are the saving remnant of peoples who only need 
FOOD to make them the masters of their fate. 
The old order of oppression, cruelty and massacre is passing 
away in the Near East. The new era of freedom and 
liberty is dawning there. 
NOW is the critical hour in the history of these peoples. If 
they are saved NOW they can rehabilitate their country, 
establish freedom and secure their industrial supremacy. 
These things are just within their grasp, after centuries of 

hope deferred. 
Help given NOW will mean ultimate victory. The help 
needed is FOOD, to save these millions FROM starva- 
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$5 given NOW will prolong one life for a month. 
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America has never been defeated in any campaign upon 

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This life-saving campaign is her work. Won't you make it 

YOURS .' 
Help Uncle Sam save these starving peoples and secure for 

them what we enjoy — life, liberty and happiness. 
Give them LIFE and they will win the rest for themselves. 
Every cent given goes to buy bread. Not a penny for expenses. 
Send all contributions to the New York Committee for Arme- 
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Make checks payable to Cleveland H. Dodge, Treasurer. 
This work is conducted in perfect co-operation 
and with full approval of the American Red 
Cross, which uses this Committee as their 
agency in this field. 
Special Campaign Committee 
Hon. William Howard Taft William B. Millar 

Hon. Charles Evans Hughes Frederick H. Allen 

Hon. John Piiiioy Mitchel Edwin M. Bulkley 

Hon Henry Morgenthau Samuel T. Dntlou 

RahM Stephen S. Wise Harold A. Hatch 

James Cardinal Gibbons Hamilton Holt 

Kt. Rev. David H. Greer John R. Mutt 

Alexander J. Hemphill Albert Shaw 

Arthur Curriss James James M. Speers 

Vance C McCormick Oscar S. Straus 

Chas. S. MacParland Talcott Williams 

Win. Jay Schieffelin Cecil O. Dunaway. Secretary 

Every Cent Buys Bread — Not a Penny Goes for Expenses 

CLEVELAND H. DODGE, Treasurer, 
1 Madison Avenue, New York. 

Enclosed find $...-. for Armenian and Syrian Relief. 

Name 

Addrees 

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Voice Thrower 

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Is the Star System All Wrong? 

TO THE editor of Film Fun : 
The famous slogan of the suffragettes, "Taxation without representa- 
tion," could very well be made to fit the case of a disappointed moving 
picture adherent, who, having paid his money at the box office — his taxa- 
tion—receives in return for same not only nothing of equity, but is allowed the 
privilege (?) of sitting through a dreary, padded-out story advertised as a strong 
photo drama; and not being allowed a voice in public protest is his position of being 
"without representation." The motion picture theater and what it represents (and 
doesn't represent) has become a factor in our everyday life, and every intelligent 
patron of the shadow play feels his right to criticism. As a consistent disburser of 
small change at the box office of the various motion picture theaters in New York 
and elsewhere about the country, I am now obeying a justified, legitimate impulse to 
protest against the enormous output of atrocious film "stuff" that is being shown for 
the entertainment of thousands of patrons who deserve so much at the managers' hands. 

Of course, I am not unmindful of the very lovely nature pictures and an occasional 
play, well written and distinctly well registered, which find their way on the screen; 
but the average photoplay is absurd, without continuity and is produced chiefly to 
exploit the beauty of a "star" whose vogue has not evolved through histrionic ability, 
but because of a shapely back or a recognized camera quality of rolling her eyes, the 
rest being printers' ink, thousands of dollars of it, plus the inconceivable and suspi- 
cious leniency of her manager. 

I maintain, first and last, that it's the play that counts and not the "star." Natu- 
rally, there are exceptions — Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, 
Geraldine Farrar are names in the movie world to conjure with, and if they receive 
the fabulous salaries accredited to them, it is because any one of them is a "sure-fire" 
box-office proposition. But my contention is that the managers have got the "star" 
craze, and the public pays to see reputed $100,000 salaried ladies filmed through five 
reels of flubdub which represents neither life on this planet nor in the world to come 
and is valuable only as a "chaser. " It's on these productions that fortunes are spent, 
to give a "star" a chance to show how little she knows of the true art of acting! 
Star craze! I'm wondering what Mrs. Griffith, who takes so sane a view of motion 
picture production, will say to Mr. Thomas H. Ince's startling announcement in a 
recent Sunday issue of the Morning Telegraph anent the Million Dollar (I've humbly 
capitalized both words) scheme of a big producing concern, to spend that amount in 
advertising the personalities of it's six stars! Stars! Personalities! He insists that 
everybody wants to know about the personality of a star! (Oh, never mind the play! 
Print reams about her personality !) 

Certainly the big public that surges hourly into the motion picture theaters over the 
world has its favorites, but the published fact that this or that "star" prefers wheat 
cakes to chocolate caramels or always plays with her bull pup on the lawn before 
breakfast does not form a queue to the box office ! And isn't it possible that the 
stupendous commercial side of the "movie game" is destroying Mr. Thomas H. Ince's 
sense of humor? Hear him speak (I quote from the Morning Telegraph): "Caruso is 
perhaps the best known and best paid single illustration of the earning possibilities in 
the musical world, and while he receives something like three thousand dollars a night 
and is enabled to make perhaps sixty appearances a season, his voice is enjoyed only 
by an audience of some few thousand each night, while if Caruso was a famous motion 
picture star, he would be seen every night by audiences all over the world — audiences 
that would number well up in the millions in the aggregate." 

Poor Caruso ! What's just being the world's greatest tenor compared to a motion 
picture star seen nightly by millions all over the world? Come, producers, give us 
something sound in the way of a play, give us life as it actually is lived, or at least a 
semblance of relative events that might possibly occur, and we will take an occasional 
vamp or even bobbing curls and insipidity; give us honest-to-goodness drama once in 
awhile, and you can keep your high-priced "stars" and their blessed personalities. 
But, please, Mr. Ince, don't lose your sense of humor! Kate Carter. 

Editor's Note: We cannot agree with all that this well-known writer says concerning 
screen productions. And yet she has put her finger on a very vulnerable spot in the motion 
pictute business. What do you think of Miss Carter' s criticisms*? We would like to hear 
" the other side " discussed. 



The Wonderful Mission 



of the Internal Bath 



By Walter Walgrove 



D 



O you know that over three hundred thousand Ameri- 
cans are at the present time seeking freedom from 
small, as well as serious ailments, by the practice 
of Internal Bathing? 



Do you know that hosts of enlightened physicians all over 
the country, as well as osteopaths, physical culturists, etc., 
etc., are recommending and recognizing this practice as the 
most likely way now known to secure and preserve perfect 
health? 

There are the best of logical reasons for this practice and 
these opinions, and these reasons will be very interesting to 
every one. 

In the first place, every physician realizes and agrees that 
95 per cent, of human illnesses is caused directly or indirectly 
by accumulated waste in the colon; this is bound to accumu- 
late, because we of today neither eat the kind of food nor take 
the amount of exercise which Nature demands in order that 
she may thoroughly eliminate the waste unaided 

That's the reason when you are ill the physician always 
gives you something to remove this accumulation of waste be- 
fore commencing to treat your specific trouble. 

It's ten to onb that no specific trouble would have devel- 
oped if there were no accumulation of waste in the colon 



And that's the reason that the famous Professor Metch- 
nikoff, one of the world's greatest scientists, has boldly and 
specifically stated that if our colons were taken away in in- 
fancy, the length of our lives would be increased to probably 
150 years. You see, this waste is extremely poisonous, and 
as the blood flows through the walls of the colon it absorbs the 
poisons and carries them through the circulation — that's what 
causes Auto-Intoxication, with all its perniciously enervating 
and weakening results. These pull down our powers of resist- 
ance and render us subject to almost any serious complaint 
which may be prevalent at the time. And the worst feature 
of it is that there are few of us who know when we are Auto- 
Intoxicated. 

But you never can be Auto-Intoxicated if you periodically 
use the proper kind of an Internal Bath — that is sure. 

It is Nature's own relief and corrector — just warm water, 
which, used in the right way, cleanses the colon thoroughly 
its entire length and makes and keeps it sweet, clean and 
pure, as Nature demands it shall be for the entire system to 
work properly. 

The following enlightening news article is quoted from 
the New York Times: 

"What may lead to a remarkable advance in the operative 
treatment of certain forms of tuberculosis is said to have been 
achieved at Guy's Hospital. Briefly, the operation of the 
removal of the lower intestine has been applied to cases of 
tuberculosis, and the results are said to be in every way 
satisfactory. 

"The principle of the treatment is the removal of the cause 
of the disease. Recent researches of Metchnikoff and others 
have led doctors to suppose that many conditions of chronic 
ill-health, such as nervous debility, rheumatism, and other 
disorders, are due to poisoning set up by unhealthy conditions 



in the large intestine, and it has even been suggested that the 
lowering of the vitality resulting from such poisoning is 
favorable to the development of cancer and tuberculosis. 

"At Guy's Hospital Sir William Arbuthnot Lane decided 
on the heroic plan of removing the diseased organ. A child 
who appeared in the final stage of what was believed to be an 
incurable form of tubercular joint disease, was operated on. 
The lower intestine, with the exception of nine inches, was 
removed, and the portion left was joined to the smaller 
intestine. 

"The result was astonishing. In a week's time the inter- 
nal organs resumed all their normal functions, and in a few 
weeks the patient was apparently in perfect health." 

You undoubtedly know, from your own personal experi- 
ence, how dull and unfit to work or think properly, biliousness 
and many other apparently simple troubles make you feel. 
And you probably know, too, that these irregularities, all di- 
rectly traceable to accumulated waste, make you really sick 
if permitted to continue. 

You also probably know that the old-fashioned method of 
drugging for these complaints, is at best only partially effect- 
ive; the doses must be increased if continued, and finally they 
cease to be effective at all. 

It is true that more drugs are probably used for this than 
all other human ills combined, which simply goes to prove 
how universal the trouble caused by accumulated waste really 
is — but there is not a doubt that drugs are being dropped as 
Internal Bathing is becoming better known 

For it is not possible to conceive, until you have had the 
experience yourself, what a wonderful bracer an Internal Bath 
really is; taken at night, you awake in the morning with a 
feeling of lightness and buoyancy that cannot be described — 
you are absolutely clean, everything is working in perfect ac- 
cord, your appetite is better, your brain is clearer, and you 
feel full of vim and confidence for the day's duties. 

There is nothing new about Internal Baths except the way 
of administering them. Some years ago Dr. Chas. A. Tyrrell, 
of New York, was so miraculously benefited by faithfully using 
the method then in vogue, that he made Internal Baths his 
special study and improved materially in administering the 
Bath and in getting the result desired. 

This perfected Bath he called the "J. B. L. Cascade," and 
it is the one which has so quickly popularized and recom- 
mended itself that hundreds of thousands are today using it. 

Dr. Tyrrell, in his practice and researches discovered 
many unique and interesting facts in connection with this 
subject; these he has collected in a little book, "The What, 
the Why, the Way of Internal Bathing," which will be sent 
free on request if you address Chas. A. Tyrrell, M. D., 134 
West 65th Street, New York City, and mention having read 
this in Film Fun. 

This book tells us facts that we never knew about our- 
selves before, and there is no doubt that every one who has an 
interest in his or her own physical well-being, or that of the 
family, will be very greatly instructed and enlightened by 
reading this carefully prepared and scientifically correct little 
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An Easterner in the Golden 
West 

(Continued from a previous page) 
earlier than in the East, an eight o'clock 
call being general. Three faithful dogs 
— a collie, a Scotch terrier and a little 
yellow mutt — usually accompany me to 
the studio gate. The greenroom is filled 
with the members of the companies 
waiting to go out on location, and the 
big stages are ready with their sets for 
the day's work. 

There are but few ways to spend 
evenings in Santa Barbara, the most 
popular being the patronage of picture 
shows. Then there are the two big 
hotels, where dancing is held one or 
more nights a week— and one can al- 
ways motor. 

Trips into Los Angeles, a distance of 
three and one-half hours, are week-end 
events and keep one from getting into 
a rut, which the quiet surroundings of 
the place is apt to induce. 

Every month or two I take a week 
off and drive up to within a few miles 
of Fresno, to cast a lordly eye over 
acres of what I hoped would have been 
a lucrative bean crop this year. But a 
weather surprise spoiled the crop, so 
beans are unpopular with me for the 
moment. This coming year I am plant- 
ing most of the acreage to the grapes 
which hang golden in the long days of 
still sunshine — these to become, in their 
final development, raisins. 

Going to New York last Christmas 
was my first trip East in three years. 
I enjoyed it as a novelty. I am now of 
the opinion that one should go East 
every two years at least, so that he 
may the more thoroughly appreciate 
the blessings of the big out-of-door life 
that one gets in the best place in the 
world — California. 

To the Studio by Aerial 
Taxi 

(Continued from a previous page) 

We left the ground and just floated 
up. I had expected to be hanging in 
midair in a perpendicular position, but 
we were simply gliding upward; I was 
just on the merest slant. Mr. Sperry 
had told me if I were frightened to 
pound him on the back, because it is 
very difficult to make oneself heard 



Studio Directory 

For the convenience of our readers 
who may desire the addresses of film 
companies, we give the principal ones 
below. The first is the business office ; 
(s) indicates a studio; at times both 
may be at one address. 

American Film Mfg. Co., 6227 Broadway, Chica- 
go, 111. Santa Barbara, Cal. (s). 

Artcraft Pictures Corporation (Mary Pickford, 
Douglas Fairbanks, et al.), 485 Fifth Avenue, 
New York City. Hollywood, Cal. (s). 

Balboa Amusement Producing Co., Long 
Beach, Cal. (s). 

Brenon, Herbert, Prod., 729 Seventh Ave., New 
York City. Hudson Heights, N. J. (s). 

Christie Film Corp., Main and Washington 
Sts., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Cosmofotofilm Co., Candler Building, New 
York City. 

Clara Kimball Young Company, Aeolian Hall, 
New York City. 

Edison, Thomas, Inc., 2826 Decatur Ave., New 
York City. (s). 

Educational Films Corporation, 729 Seventh 
Ave., New York City. 

Empire All Star Corporation, 220 S. State St., 
Chicago, III. Myrtle Ave., Glendale,L.I.(s). 

Essanay Film Mfg. Co., 1333 Argyle St., Chica- 
go, 111. (s). 

Famous Players - Lasky Film Company, 485 
Fifth Avenue, New York City. 128 W. 56th 
Street, New York City. (s). 

Fox Film Corporation, ISO West 46th St., New 
York City. 1401 Western Ave., Los Ange- 
les, Cal. (s). Fort Lee, N.J. (s). 

Gaumont Company, 110 West 40th Street, New 
York City. Flushing, N. Y. (s). Jackson- 
ville, Fla. (s). 

Goldwyn Film Corp.. 16 E. 42d St., New York 
City. Fort Lee, N. J. (s). 

General Film Company, 440 Fourth Ave., New 
York City. 

Horsley Studio, Main and Washington, Los 

Kalem "company, 325 West »3d St., New York 
City. 251 W. 19th St., New York City, (s), 
1425 Fleming St., Hollywood, Cal. (s). Tal- 
lyrand Ave., Jacksonville, Fla <s). Glen- 
dale, Cal. (s). 

Keystone Film Co., 1712 Allesandio St., Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Kleine, George, 166 N. State St., Chicago. 

Metro Pictures Corp., 1476 Broadway, New 
York City. Rolfe Photoplay Co. and Colum- 
bia Pictures Corp., 3 West 61st St., New 
York City. (s). Popular Plays and Players, 
Fort Lee, N. J. (s). Quality Pictures Corp., 
Metro Office. Yorke Film Co.. Hollywood, 
Cal. (s). 

Morosco Photoplay Company, 485 Fifth Ave., 
New York City. 201 Occidental Blvd., Los 
AriErclcs Csl (s) 

Moss, B. S., 729 Seventh Ave., New York City. 

Mayfair Pictures Corp., 10 Wall St., New York 
City. 515 W. 54th Street, New York City.(s). 

Mutual Film Corp., Consumers Building, Chi- 
cago. 

Paramount Pictures Corporation, 71 W. 23d 
St., New York City. 485 Fifth Ave., New 
York City. 

Peralta Plays, Inc.. 729 Seventh Ave., New York 
City. Los Angeles, Cal. (s). 

Pathe Exchange, 25 West 45th St., New York 
City. Jersey City, N. J. (s). 

Petrova Pictures, 25 W. 44th St., New York 
City. 807 W. 176th St., New York City. (s). 

Powell, Frank, Production Co., Times Building. 
New York City. 

Rothacker Film Mfg. Co., 1339 Diversey Park- 
way. Chicago, 111. (s). 

Selig Polyscope Co., Garland Bldg., Chicago, 
Western and Irving Park Blvd., Chicago.(s). 
3800 Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. (s). 

Select Pictures Corp., 729 Seventh Ave., New 
York City. 807 East 176th Street. New 
York City. Is), 

Signal Film Corp., 4560 Pasadena Ave., Los An- 
geles, Cal. (s). 

Talmadge, Norma, 729 Seventh Ave., New York 
City. 318 East 48th Street, New York 
City. (s). 

Thanhouser Film Corp., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
(s). Jacksonville, Fla. (s). 

Triangle Company, 1457 Broadway, New York 
City. Culver City, Cal. (s). 

Universal Film Mfg. Co., 1600 Broadway, New 
York City. Universal City, Cal. (s). Coy- 
etsville, N. J. (s). 

Vitagraph Company of America, 1600 Broad- 
way, New York City. E. 15th Street and 
Locust Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. (s). Holly- 
wood, Cal. (s). 

Vogue Comedy Co.,GowerSt. and Santa Moni- 
ca Bldg., Hollywood, Cal. 

World Film Corp,, 130 West 46th St., New York 
City. Fort Lee, N. J. (s). 



above the hum of the engine. I was 
well relaxed and even chuckling to 
myself over my first nervousness. 

It is difficult to express what my feel- 
ings were, because I am sure there is 
nothing else in the world that in any 
way resembles the sensation of detach- 
ment and isolation one experiences 
when well away on his first flight. I 
have helped at the launching of a big 
ship; I've been so far out of sight of 
land that I seemed to myself about as 
large and as important as one of the 
lone gulls; only the day before I had 
hung onto the ice sledge, going at a 
speed of seventy miles an hour down 
the bay, scootering. But this was dif- 
ferent. This made me feel, somehow, 
as if I was helping just a little bit to 
put over a big thing — something really 
great and worth while. Men have been 
flying for a long time, trying to make 
the conquest of the air safe. Not many 
women before me had done their bit. 
My confidence began to soar, even as 
our machine mounted higher and high- 
er. I was thrilled. My heart tnrobbed, 
and every nerve, though taut, was in 
perfect tune. Some day not far distant 
I expect to take flying as a matter of 
course, but I shall never forget how I 
felt that day. 

We were about five thousand feet up 
in the air, and the old earth looked like 
an automobile map, when we took a 
startlingly abrupt dive. My chuckle 
was choked off, swallowed. When I 
got my breath back, I pounded poor 
Mr. Sperry soundly. We seemed then 
to have righted ourselves and started 
up again. Then we coasted slowly 
down and landed in a marsh in the 
midst of a cornfield, somewhere in the 
vicinity of Old Point Comfort. 

I was afraid that Mr. Sperry had 
gotten cross with me, maybe for pound- 
ing him, and was going to tell me to 
get out and wait till he had finished 
his flight, and then he would come back 
and get me ; but he patted me on the 
back, and as I turned around to tell 
him how much I had enjoyed the trip, I 
saw that his face and his goggles were 
dripping wet. A spray of water and 
alcohol from some exhaust pipe that 
hadn't been properly pinched together 
had blinded him for a moment, and this 
had caused our abrupt descent. 

The full story of our mishap and the 
measure of our danger I learned later. 
There wasn't much danger. The ma- 
chine was equipped with special safety 



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devices, but the motor became over- 
heated because there was water in the 
gasoline, and so, for that time, we had to 
leave the plane and march back home. 
Like it? Why, yes, that's what I've 
been trying all along to tell you. I am 
so sure this is the right answer to the 
troublesome problem of delays in train 
traveling that I am buying for my own 
use a Curtis triplane. I have concluded 
arrangements with a capable man to 
drive it for me, and hereafter I expect 
to keep my dates at film studios and 
elsewhere, en plane vol. 

Clothes — A Vital Theme 

(Continued from a previous page) 
part in the production. Even with the 
preliminary reading of the scenario, I 
am keyed to catch suggestions, and 
often a situation in the synopsis will 
inspire an unusual idea and set me off 
on a new trail. 

While the building up of situations 
and the working out of big scenes is 
the meat of my work, gathering the 
wardrobe, picking over exquisite mate- 
rials — plushy velvets, chiffons and cob- 
web laces — is my dessert. It is the 
most fascinating sport in the world, for 
I am not alone pleasing myself, but 
gambling, as I said before, on the er- 
rant whims of a delightful tyrant. 

I believe that a woman's personal 
appearance is one of her most depend- 
able assets, not alone on the stage, but 
in every walk of life. 

When she has chosen her dresses, 
the same careful attention should be 
given to hats, shoes and gloves, for it 
is the harmony with which these extras 
are selected that makes the perfectly 
appointed woman. 

Above all else, the thing demanded 
in choosing frocks, be it this year's 
styles or next, is the foolproof quality 
of simplicity. Overdressing is as sad a 
vice as over-eating, and the woman 
who stays close to the simple lines and 
eschews an excess of trimmings and 
flouncings, furbelows and frills, plays 
a winning hand. More productions are 
ruined by inartistic gowning than by 
anything else. Simplicity comes high, 
but it pays. 




I 






Ambition 

By Bernadine Hilty 

'LL JUST bet you couldn't guess, 

In a thousand million years, 
What I will do when I grow up. 
Oooooo ! it fills me full of fears ! 

I'm going to be a movie star, 
And growl and bark like wild ! 

I'll be the big, brave hero-dog 
That saves the little child. 

I won't have curls like Mary, 
Nor be a Theda Bara vamp; 

But, say, my teeth will flash and gleam 
When I see a bold, bad tramp ! 

I'll play the Red Cross war dog 

And drag the soldiers up. 
When I get big and in the films, 

You bet I'll be SOME pup! 

A Fair Start 

"Why do you object to my marrying 
your daughter?" 

"Because you can't support her in 
the style to which she has been accus- 
tomed all her life." 

"How do you know I can't? I can 
start her on bread-and-milk, same as 
you did!"— Tit-Bits. 



Film Fun 

Magazine of Fun, Judge's Library and 
Sis Hopkins' Own Book Combined. 

itiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliitiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimtiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiitiiiiiliiii 

No. 348— MARCH-APRIL, 1918 

IIIIIII1III1IIIIIIIII1IIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIINIIIIIIIHIIIIIIII1IIIIIIIIMIII1IIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIII1IIIIIIIII1IIIIIIII 

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leuben P. Sleicher, Secretary. 
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Grant Hamilton. Art Director. 
Jessie Niles Burness, Editor. 

f 225 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

iimmufflmiii mi i «m iiimiimiiiuimimi minimum ' ' imiiimniiiy 

/Copyright, 1918, by Leslie-Judge Company, » 
/ Publishers. 

/ Title registered as a trade-mark. 

Entered at the post-office at New York as 
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'WALL-NUTS" "GOOD-NIGHT, NURSE" 

By James Montgomery Flagg 




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Five brilliant paint- 
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ONE of America's most 
charming and gifted 
actresses, Elsie Fer- 
guson, is repeating on the 
screen the triumphs of her 
notable stage career. 
Beautiful and 

patrician M i s s m„, Sji m FAMOUS PLAYERS -LASKY CORPORATION 

Ferguson ; ° " * adoiph z3kor 




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Richly endowed as an artist 
her technique and varied ex- 
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for her a place of distinction 
and great popularity in the 
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Contributors 
in this number: 

Elsie Ferguson 
P e a r 1 While 
Marguerite Clark 
r Fatty" Arbuckle 
Linda A. Griffith 
Horace D. Ashton 
shir lev Mason 
& . S a s a o 
and others 



Specially Posed for 
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COPYRIGHT 1918 BY 
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P r i c e 1 C e n t s 

MAY 

19 18 




MME. OLGA PFTROVA 



gllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM 

I VIRTUE IN THE BALLET I 



Of all the witches and semi-witches ot that eternal Wal- 
purgis Night that represents the world, the ladies of the ballet 
have at all times and in all places been regarded as least like 
saints. 

Whenever a new, youthful dancer appeared at the Paris 
Opera House the habitues vied with each other in showering 
her with attentions and in overwhelming her with a veritable 
broadside of Cupid's artillery. 

For how could these young and prelty girls with every 
right to life, love and pleasure, and subsisting on a very small 
salary, resist the seduction of the smell of flowers and of the 
glitter of jewels ? 

She had the voluptuous form of a Greek Helen and she 
took the old guard of the Opera House by stoim. The very next 
morning a perfect shower of billets-doux, jewels, and bouquets 
fell into the poor dancer's modest apartment. 

He was a rich stockbroker, one of those generous gen- 
tlemen," if the object of his momentary fancy was young and 
pretty and apparently unsophisticated. And then there was 
another, who sent no diamonds, and not even flowers, but who 
was young and goodlooking, though poor, and who worshipped 
her from afar until that memorable night — but read the whole 
story for yourself as Maupassant tells it — an amusing story that 
is a gem of art and irony, a story wilh an unexpected ending 
that will do your heart good, and found with all Maupassant's 
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this superb VERDUN EDITION of 

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and action. If he is terribly real, and the nudity of his human nature is 
startling in its effect, it is because his stories mirror life as he found it. 

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347 Stories, Novels, Novelettes, 
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The petty meannesses of human nature 
and the passions — lust and cupidity — which 
stir most men and women to action did not 
stay Maupassant's impartial hand so long 
as this ugly side of humanity existed. 
Pitiless as is his art, at times he surprises 
us with a touch of tender pathos in which 
we recognize the warm heart of a fellowman. 

GREATEST OF STORY 
WRITERS 

As the supreme master in what is one 
of the most, difficult forms of art — the short 
story — Maupassant's fame has extended 
into all civilized lands. Tolstoy marveled 
at the depth of human interest he found in 
his stories: Andrew Lang declared he found 
in him "the tenderness of Fielding, the 
graphic power of Smollett, the biting satire 
of Dean Swift, mingled and reincarnated 
in Gallic guise;" a nd Henry James hailed 
him as '* a man of genius who had achieved 
the miracle of a fresh tone." 



Illlllllllillllllllllllllir- 



MAY -7 1318 OCIB4120J4 




The Dolly sisters (Roszika and Yansci) in their first film play, "The Millionaire Dollys." 

Film Fun 

225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

An Independent Illustrated Monthly Magazine 
Devoted to the Best Interests of All 
Motion Picture Art and Artists 

MAY-1918 



o 



n 



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ILLUSTRATED FEATURES : 

The Magic of a Smile 



Marguerite Clark 



How to Grow Thin— While You Wait Fatty (Roscoe)Arbuckle 



The Celluloid Drama in Japan 
Advantages of Screen Over Stage 
Why I Want to Work for Uncle Sam 

Microscopic Movie Marvels 
The Evolution of a Star 
The Blue Bird for Happiness 



G. Sasao 
Elsie Ferguson 
Pearl White 

Horace D. Ashton 
Shirley Mason 
The Editor 



COMMENTS OF A FREE LANCE: 

Mary MacLane 

The Movies and the Newspapers 

Mirroring Thoughts 

Re-enter Mabel Normand 

Beauty a Duty 

A Club for Studio Girls 

Why Failures Strew the Starry Way Linda A. Griffith 



EDITORIALS : 

The Public Responsible 

A Harmful Phrase 

Original Music for Photoplays 

MISCELLANEOUS : 

Flash Backs; Some News Nuggets and Critical Quips 

You at tlte Top Vera Vladimir 

Wliat They Missed 

Don't You Hate 'Em ? Charlotte R. Mish 

Goodness I 

Gracious ! 

A Question Harold Seton 

Laugh and Live Lieut. Harold Hersey 

ART PORTRAITS : 

Peggy Hyland, Agnes Ayres. Elsie Ferguson, Mary Pickford, 
Douglas Fairbanks, Kathleen Clifford. Edith Story. 



$100 a y ear 



Number 349 



10c a copy 




Something of the charm of a Sargent painting is in this excellent camera-study of a camera poseure. Peggy 

Hyland, recently charted in the Fox galaxy of the film firmament says of this 'tween seasons costume, 

that New York weather requires one to be ready for whatever may come to pass, at the shortest 

possible notice. The gowns she wears in "The Debt of Honor" meet every requirement. 




PARAMOUNT 



You've danced your way into all hearts, "Prunella," and even of ""Pierrot's" garret you made a bit of heaven. 

The Magic of a Smile 



Hovd the Miracle of Cheerfulness Works in the World of Movies 

By Marguerite Clark 



IT SEEMS to me that most of us, in this age of mar- 
velous scientific achievements and discoveries, do 
not often enough bring 
ourselves to believe in mir- 
acles. "Childish foolishness," 
say we loftily. But to me, life 
itself is crowded with wonder- 
ful things — the springtime, flow- 
ers, a sunset, and, perhaps most 
wonderful of all, a smile. Truly, 
I have seen what might actually 
be called miracles accomplished 
through the medium of one tiny 
smile. So when I was asked to 
write on the subject, I was more 
than pleased; for it is a pet theory 
of mine that a smile has "magic" 
qualities, like the fairy's wand, 
bringing happiness, beauty, even 
riches — for many an actress has 
become famous through her pos- 
session of a beautiful smile. 

In daily life a smile paves 
one's way with kindness, and you 
will find by watching successful 
people that they are the ones who 
have been able to "smile, smile, 
smile" — with all their troubles in 




PARAMOUNT 



Moon-madness makes mummers of us all 



the "old kit bag." Nowhere is this truer than in a motion 
picture studio, where the daily grind becomes almost 

unbearable at times, amid the 
confusion, the unavoidable de- 
lays, the petty annoyances. 

Often we film folk are obliged 
to be at the studio before eight 
o'clock in the morning. There 
seems to be a certain lighting ob- 
tainable at that time of which di- 
rectors are most fond. For in- 
stance, at Christmastime last year, 
in attempting to finish ' ' The Seven 
Swans" for the Yuletide release, 
we had often to begin work at an 
hour when most people were con- 
sidering how much longer they 
could sleep without missing the 
eight-forty-five. Several evenings 
we stayed until after midnight, 
and one time, especially, I re- 
member that we worked from 
eight in the morning till three 
o'clock of the next morning. Di- 
rector Dawley, with his dry humor 
and quick smile, kept us all in a 
pleasant mood, however, and be- 
tween scenes it was amusing to 



watch the different players adapt themselves 
some waits — and always cheerfully. Some 
"fairies" had their knitting, my seven broth- 
ers were busy playing poker, I think, 
while Richard Barthelmess, the 
"Prince Charming," and myself, 
with two others, amused our- 
selves at bridge or watching 
the taking of scenes. The lat- > 
ter is a fascinating occupa- i 
tion, and much can be 
gained by watching the other 
players at work. Had there 
been grumbling or dissatis- 
faction, the picture might 
have been spoiled and many 
a kiddie's Christmas treat 
made a failure. 

It was in making "The Seven 
Swans" that the director's smile 
was most needed, for among the dozens 
of youngsters of from three to five, there 
were several who were making what the 
papers called their "screen debut," and who 
were consequently inclined to be a bit tem- 
peramental at times. With infinite tact and 
patience, however, the director would tell 
them marvelous stories or send out for ice 
cream, all with his customary good-humored 
smile so dear to the sensitive heart of child- 
hood. 

I thoroughly believe, too, that Director 
Dawley must have even used his all-conquer- 
ing smile upon the swans hired to play one 
of the most important roles in the piece. 
Seriously, the difference in their behavior, the 
last days of their sojourn with us, from the 
uproariously indignant acting of the first part 



to the tire- was a veritable miracle. Perhaps of all the studio folk, 
of the it is the director who values most the real magic 

qualities of a kind word and a smile in 
times of stress. 

Smiling is as natural to an ac- 
tress as breathing. From her 
earliest training she learns the 
value of a happy face in win- 
ning the sympathy of her 
audiences. An actress who 
is given a part wherein she 
is obliged to play a disa- 
greeable character has all 
the sympathy of her fel- 
low-players, for hers is the 
hardest role. This was ex- 
emplified in Helen Gr.eene's 
part of Bab's sister in the 
'Bab" stories. As Leila, the 
older sister, she was obliged to 
appear overbearing and rude, and 
she alone, of all the cast, was glad when 
the pictures were finished. 

As the impractical and impulsive Bab, I 
was obliged to use ? "smile's magic" very 
often in getting myself out of constant 
scrapes. In the first one, "Bab's Diary," I 
had invented a fictitious name for a sweet- 
heart, so that I could hold him over the fam- 
ily to blackmail them into allowing me the 
privileges which Leila, my older sister, en- 
joyed. All went smoothly until Carter Brooks, 
an old friend, pretended to have found the 
original of my invention and presented him 
in the flesh. Then came my downfall. I had 
written absurdly sentimental letters to this 
fictitious sweetheart, and now I learned this 
real man had them. How to get them back? 




PARAMOUNT 

{Circle) Marguerite 
Clark and Jules Rau- 
court. (Panel) As 
"Pierette" and "Pier- 
rot" taking a curtain. 




ARAMOl'NT 



"Come, join in our play, all of yon who would forget care and be happy for a little while 




PARAMOUNT 



When caught burglarizing a strange man's desk, simply smile at him this way — as Marguerite Clark 

did in "Bab's Diary" — and he will immediately change his mind about having you arrested. 

Instead, he will take you home in a taxi, and the next day will send you violets. 



Hardly realizing the absurdity of what I was doing, I 
rushed to his home to recover them. How I got caught in 
someone else's room and was nearly arrested, escaping by 
a hair's breadth and the best smile I could muster, was a 
thrilling tale. 

In "Bab's Burglar, " where I succeeded in purchasing 
an automobile out of a somewhat slim allowance, I was 
haled into court, and once more the valuable smile came 
into play. 

In ' ' Prunella, ' ' the contrast between the three old aunts, 
Prim, Prude and Privacy, and the gayety of the young niece 
is evident. Prunella is a joyous youngster, who frets un- 
der the restraint of her narrow life in the quaint old cot- 
tage, and consequently falls an easier victim to the wiles 
of the handsome Pierrot. It is her smile, as she peeps over 
the hedge at him, that wins his vagrant love. There comes 
a time when she is not sure she is glad about this, but at 
the end she returns to the old home, where she finds him 
awaiting her, and their happiness recommences for always. 

I have spoken of some of the reasons for "smiles" at a 
studio. There are many others, for an actress's life, even 
in the comparatively uneventful filming days, is adventur- 
ous, arduous. Few persons stop to realize that for the 
taking of scenes where a player must come into a room 
during a storm, they must first be soaked under an impro- 
vised shower, be the weather frigid or tropic. 

This was necessary in scenes for "Rich Man, Poor 
Man," which is an adaptation of Maximilian Foster's 



novel of that name. Mr. Dawley took a more or less rusty 
watering can of the ordinary garden variety, with cold — 
oh, very, very cold ! — water in it — no other being procurable 
at the studio — and with all the sang-froid of his character, 
carelessly sprinkled it over me. In this case it was utterly 
impossible not to smile, for the entire company had gath- 
ered for the fun, and many were the jokes at my expense, 
as I stood with my feet in a disreputable old tin tub and 
the water dribbling down my face and shabby clothes. 

It isn't easy always to keep a smile on one's face, and 
really mean it, when things go wrong. A screen star has 
just as much provocation to yield to "temperament" as a 
footlight favorite has, but I think most of us avoid show- 
ing any mental disturbance, because the camera is a sort 
of goblin that will surely catch us "if we don't watch 
out." After all, there isn't the least doubt but that the 
smiling habit can be acquired by a little persistence and a 
good deal of forbearance, and it is very well worth while. 

Life in the studios, just as outside, is made much 
easier and pleasanter if "well seasoned with a smile." 




How to Grow Thin — While You Wait 

A Famous Avoirdupois Comedian Repeals the Inner Secrets of Flesh Reduction 

By FATTY (ROSCOE) ARBUCKLE 

(Editor's Note: ■ Responding to a world-wide clamor that he reveal his secrets of growing thin, Fatty 
Arbuckle has at last agreed to make public, through FILM FUN, the scientific discoveries which he alone 
possesses. Mr. Arbuckle has only disdain for the tame advice offered by such health and beauty experts as 
Lina Cavalieri, Doc Wiley, Anna Held, Mary Garden and Lillian Russell. Getting away from the cut-and- 
dried methods of flesh reduction, the author will present in these pages a series of articles in which his 
confidences will gladden the hearts of all who would put themselves right with their tailors.) 



IT IS estimated that fat people have rolled billions of 
miles in the last year in their frantic efforts to grow 
thin, with but very little real success. The practical 
jokers in the medical profession are simply having 
their own laugh at the expense of the gullible public. 

Take up tumbling is my advice. 

Tumbling will cause you to fall off more than does roll- 
ing. When I was young and inexperienced, I did not revel 
in the buoyant grace and debutant figure of my manhood. 
That was because I rolled. I can assure you that after 
rolling all about town, I actually gained weight, and yet 
my vitality suffered. I couldn't sleep nights, and for a 
while it looked as if I would never attain that perfection 
of form which has been my fortune in motion pictures. 

If you must roll, be a low roller, because high rollers 
only reduce their pocketbooks. Do not attach too much 
importance to the old proverbs. That "A rolling stone 
gathers no moss" or "A setting hen never gets fat" is a 
sad mistake, except when taken in a literal sense. I have 
seen lots of rollers gathering everything in sight and lots 
of fat hens that never did anything else but sit. 

I've tumbled to a whole lot of things, and I can 
solemnly aver there was a big reduction every time. 



Of course, tumbling is hard on fat people; it makes light 
of their dignity. 

Since becoming a motion picture comedian. I have had 
letters from all over the world, asking how tumbling is 
done. Here are a few recent samples: 

My dear Fat Boy : 

Honestly, I tried your horseback riding every day, and 
I've only fallen off a little bit. My weight still hovers 
around the 300 mark. What shall I do to fall off more? 

Bess Downing. 

Answer: 
My dear Bess : 

Try tumbling from a stepladder, and you will fall off 
more. 

Dear Doc Arbuckle : 

Is there any kind of food that I can get to assist me in 
reducing by rolling? Rollin Stone. 

Answer : 
Dear Rollin : 

Try rolled oats. 




PARAMOCNT- 



By constantly practicing these exercises Fatty's manly beauty resists the ravages of time and toil. 



The Celluloid Drama in Japan 

They Do Things Differently in the Land of the Rising' Sun 

By G. SASAO 




SINCE you ask me, it is my 
great pleasure to send greet- 
ings and good wishes from 
the friends of Film Fun in 
Tokyo to all readers of your magazine 
There are many of us who wait anx- 
iously for its appearance each month 
We are deeply interested in motion pic- 
tures here in Japan, and all that relates to 
film production. , 

I find it difficult to write about producing compa- 
nies in my country. The pictures I send were taken for 
you when the company was at work on a play that will 
soon be finished and may be shown in America. It 
is called "Samrae. " With us, the dress of an actor 
indicates the part he plays. With some charac- ^ {s th& ^^ 
ters you, too, do this; we do it always. A cow- Fairbanks of Japan. 
boy, in an American picture, could not be 



mistaken for any other type. That which 
you call "wild and woolly" is unreal to 
us, for the horse is rather a curiosity here, 
and it is hard for us to follow the play when a number of 
riders go dashing along the trail. It helps a great deal 
when we can find the hero, by the garb he wears, and 
follow him. We like American pictures very much, but, 
of course, our own are easier for us to understand. 

American companies are often to be found at work in 
Japan, and there are a number of Japanese companies 
that, like your own, travel about from place to place. It 
seems to us better to use the real settings where a little ex- 
tra effort or even hardship will permit. If a part of the 
action in a Japanese motion picture play takes place in the 
vicinity of the Nikko Shrine, that most beautiful of all 
Japan's beautiful places, then when you see the film you 



{Upper picture) A scene from 

a Jap film showing a 

surprising situation. 



can be sure it is that very shrine, 

built more than three hundred years 

ago, and none other, that you see. 

There is a wealth of material for 

picture plays in the legends and folk 

lore which the Japanese, as you 

perhaps know, treasure highly. Each 

man's aim, whether he be artist or 

artisan, writer or official, is to add some 

one thing worthy to endure among his country's 

possessions. It is because individuality is fostered in 

this way that so many examples of "lost arts" make 

Japan so fascinating to art treasure lovers. And if some 

sincere seeker will search it out, he will find a surprising 

storehouse of material in the literature of Japan that 

will make wonderful pictures which would be 

popular, I think. You all like "The Bluebird" 

and mystery plays like that. We like 



them too, but with us it is one of the usual 
ways to use symbols in presenting ideas 
we wish to make permanent. It is so we 
teach our children, presenting lessons in a form they 
grasp, as children of all countries grasp at fairy tales. 
When a boy reaches an age when he is thinking what he 
will do with his life, we leach him, by the use of the carp 
for a symbol, that it is his duty now to learn to swim 
upstream and gain strength by resistance. 

There are moving picture magazines pub- 
lished in several cities in Japan. I am myself 
at work upon the first number of a little pe- 
riodical. The actors contribute to it, and when 
you receive the copy which I shall send to you, 
you may find in it things about which the 
friends of Film Fun would like to know. 



fe 

4 





VTTAGRAPH 



Agnes Ayres alleges that a becoming smile ought to be regarded as an indispensable accessory 

by anyone who would be perfectly apparelled. Judged by results 

the theory is sound; seeing is 

believing. 



The Comments and Criticisms 
of a Free-Lance 



by 
Linda A. Griffith 

(Mrs. David W. Griffith) 



•{Editor's Note: The writer, who began her career with the Biograph 
Company, is well known in the moving picture world. Her latest 
success was as star in her own striking sociological play "Charity." 
She is a keen critic and analyst of all that pertains to motion 
picture art, and tells the truth about those who are striving for its 
downfall or its advancement. ) 




CAMl'BELL PHOTO 



MARY MacLANE'S "Men Who Have Made Love 
to Me" is an interesting picture, its principal 
interest being that it is "different." I believe 
it is the first picture in which an author appears 
as the heroine of her own book. It was enjoyable to see 
on the screen a woman who was not a famous beauty or an 
opera singer, but one who has achieved fame through her 
pen, even though the character of her literary output is 
along rather sensational lines. As a movie heroine Mary 
MacLane is quite a prude compared with the famous vam- 
pires of the screen. In the role of a cinema actress Miss 
MacLane, with no previous dramatic training whatever, 
acquitted herself remarkably well. She was simple and 
sincere in everything she did and had no affectations. 
Neither did she resort to the prerogatives of her type and 
pose all over the place. Mary MacLane has an interest- 
ing, intelligent face, and her mind works; one could see 
it working on the screen. The sub-titles, which, of course, 
are from her book, were clever and gave the audience many 
a good laugh. 

The Movies and the Newspapers 

Editorials on the movies in the New York newspapers 
are now quite as common as editorials on the current news 
topics of the day. Yet how few years have passed since, 
even with a microscope, nary a word could be found in 
these big dailies pertaining to the motion pictures! The 
one big desire in the crude early days was for newspaper 
recognition. This, more than any other medium, was felt 
to be the only way to establish the movie as a branch of art 
and education. The complete ignoring of the motion pic- 
ture by the newspapers caused many a pang in those jeal- 
ous days, for the movie child was growing up, and no one 
would notice the kid at all. Could anything in this world 
be more disheartening? Those who did not participate in 
the early struggle for recognition of the movie know little 
of the silent suffering that obtained. Mr. Griffith would 
often remark: "Now, if I can only get the newspapers to 
notice me, I'd have some hope of these moving pictures." 
Balm came to his tortured soul when, in 1909, the New 
York Times gave a column write-up on his first ambitious 
effort, the movie version of Browning's* "Pippa Passes." 
The picture did not make money, but the newspaper men- 



tion of it gave to the producer what money could not give. 
That was fresh ambition and a hope that burned to light 
the way to Griffith's great epic, "The Birth of a Nation," 
and let us hope will lead to his other thrilling spectacle, 
soon to be revealed, showing the Great War. 

Mirroring Thoughts 

William S. Hart, in "Blue Blazes Rawden," again de- 
lights his million followers. This photoplay is a charac- 
teristic Hartlnce one. The story is a bit depressing for 
these sorrowful war days. One often wonders why certain 
actors and actresses acquire such a large following. For 
instance, here is William S. Hart, about whom movie fans 
the world over are enthusiastic. He has no claim to con- 
ventional good looks; in fact, he is rather curious looking. 
The answer is, he is a good actor — a good screen actor. 
His work is always quiet and sincere, but tense; he has, 
too, great reserve strength for his big dramatic scenes. 
His is the subtle art of motion picture acting, which is 
simply giving to an audience, through the delicate, chang- 
ing expressions of the face, one's own thoughts. 

Re-enter Mabel Normand 

After an all-too-long absence from the screen, Mabel 
Normand makes her reappearance under the Goldwyn ban- 
ner. To bring back any star who had been lost to movie 
fans for a year or more (as has Miss Normand) in such a, 
hodge-podge as "Dodging a Million" is surely a pity. 
Why offer Mabel Normand in it? The fickle public soon 
enough forgets even its greatest favorite when pictures fea- 
turing them cease to be shown. It would seem that the 
least that might be done for an attractive, paying star, such 
as Miss Normand has always been, would be to reintroduce 
her in a vehicle worthy of her talents.' Whatever "Dodg- 
ing a Million" is all about is more than I know. In this I 
do not lack company, for there are many whose mental 
perception of this photoplay is as vague as mine. At the 
theater where I saw this picture people all about me kept 
wondering when the heroine would "wake up" ; they felt 
convinced that the whole thing had suddenly turned into a 
dream, or, rather, a nightmare. Others thought the locale 
of the story had shifted to an insane asylum, and that the 
author or director had omitted the sub-title carrying this 
necessary information. 



Mabel Normand as a Keystone 
star was one of the most popular of 
the young movie actresses. She 
occupied a unique position in the 
screen world, for she was young, 
very pretty, and the only one in 
filmdom having these attributes 
who had made a name in slapstick 
comedy. As all comedians want to 
play "Hamlet, "no doubt Miss Nor- 
mand was ambitious to contribute 
to the screen both dainty comedy 
and serious work. Perhaps she can 
do so, but in "Dodging a Million" 
she certainly wasn't given an oppor- 
tunity to show whether she could or 
not. It seems a pity 
to kill off favorites 
in this fashion, but 
Mabel Normand's 
popularity will soon 
be a thing of the 
past if this is the 
best that Goldwyn 
can do for her. For 
my part, I would 
rather see her still 
throwing pies and 
doing other broad 









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PARAMOUNT 



comedy stunts 

her old line 

Charlie Chaplin 

work, for there she 

had no rival but 

him. Now she is 

merely one of 

many. There is 

nothing distinctive 

about Miss Normand in "Dodging a Million," and unless 

some interest by her managers is taken in her scenarios and 

the direction of her pictures, her screen life may be short. 




"Blue Blazes Rawden," alias William Hart, 

may take a proper pride in equipment 

that includes a Mexican bridle like this. 

You wouldn't believe what it cost. 



Mabel Normand discusses with director George Loane 
Tucker the jewel scene in "Dodging a Million." 

We Need Sincerity and Simplicity 

Charles Ray again pleases in a rural 
comedy drama, "The Hired Man." The 
story is of the clean, domestic sort, and 
the part a typical "Charles Ray" part. 
It is refreshing to see a wholesome-looking 
youth playing in good, old-fashioned, 
wholesome stories. Simplicity and nat- 
uralness are sadly lacking attributes in 
many of the young men movie actors. It 
wins out in every walk of life, so why 
don't a few of them try it — if they can? 
Please, won't Miss Doris Lee wear her 
hair in another fashion? True, she is a 
very little girl, but I hardly think the inch 
or two gained by her tumbling headdresses 
is of any advantage in making her look 
taller. It is out of keeping with the rest 
of her very dainty self. 

Ours Not to Reason Why 

I heartily agree with the editorial in 
the New York Morning Telegraph on the 
movies, which says: "The industry is 
suffering from an acute attack of 'poor 
pictures.' " 

Beauty a Duty 

George Loan Tucker is too experienced 
a movie man and too clever a producer to 
make the following statement, credited to 
him in a New York newspaper: "It is my 
firm belief that the first duty of the camera is to find beauty 
and record it." Beauty, whether of face, figure, dwelling- 
place or landscape, is always very pleasing to see on a 




motion picture screen, but beauty alone does not make an 
interesting picture. I would say that the first duty of a 
motion picture camera is to find "thought" and record it. 
A star who has beauty doesn't get so far on just beauty. 
There are some stars who feel that "beauty" alone is es- 
sential, or so much more essential than acting that, even if 
they do know how to act, they refuse to contribute acting 
to their pictures, for fear that it may spoil their studied 
"still beauty." 

Directors are much to blame along these lines, particu- 
larly when they are handling a woman who has been known 
as a famous beauty. This is the reason for the number of 
stupid, uninteresting pictures featuring such actresses and 
singers as Mary Garden, Lina Cavalieri and Maxine Elliott. 
A million Pickford curls wouldn't make another Mary Pick- 
ford or Mary Miles Minter, June 
Caprice or Vivian Martin. Noi | 
would Anita Stewart or Norma 
Talmadge have reached the heights 
they have attained on beauty alone. 
They can act and are not afraid of 
spoiling their beauty in 
Certainly no one would accuse 
imova of beauty on the 
but her acting in ' ' War 
was so splendid that one 
stop to question whether 
she was beautiful on or 
off the stage or not. 
There has been a surfeit 
of "still beauties" on 
the screen. Lucille 
gowns and ermine wraps 
are now a matter of 
course. Mabel Normand 
in her funny character 
make-up in Keystone 
comedies, when she 





GOLDWYN 



The fashion parade in "Dodging a Million" is enough to drive any 

woman to — the dressmaker. The play is one of Mabel 

Normand's latest and most elaborate offerings. 



"The Doll's House, ' ' Elsie Fer- 
guson, star, will soon be 
released. 

didn't care what hap- 
pened to her queer 
clothes or whether her 
hair was all fluffs or 
puffs, was a far more 
interesting personal- 
ity than she ever will 
be as a conventional, 
nice, properly gowned 
miss. As to men screen 
stars, there are some 
pretty boys who have 
soft brown eyes and 
dark curly hair and 
sweet smiles, such as 
Carlyle Blackwell, J. 
Warren Kerrigan and 
Francis X. Bushman; 
but where do they get 
off when compared 
with Charlie Chaplin 
or William S. Hart? 

Mr. Tucker also 
says: "In my expe- 
rience the hard, 
searching studio lights 
are cruel to facial 
irregularities. They 
seem to laugh at plain- 
ness and hold it up to 
the other hand, they 
make a pretty girl seem beautiful." 
That may be Mr. Tucker's experience, 
but it is not the experience of others. 
Some of the fairest and prettiest of 
girls do not photograph well. Hazel 
Dawn is an instance of this. Perfect 
and delicate features do not always 
make for screen beauty. On the other 
hand, I have known girls to photograph 
beautifully who are decidedly plain in 



Let it never 
be said that 
Charles Ray 
doesn't know 
beans. This 
scene from 
"The Hired 
Man" isprooj 
that he does. 

ridicule. 



real life. Screen beauty, as well as stage beauty, does not 
always denote real beauty. However much feminine beauty 
in all forms is pleasing to the eye, motion picture directors 
should remember that if the public is to be fed up on it 
seven days a week, it soon becomes tiresome. A steady 
diet of dainty French entres makes one long for a plain 
boiled New England dinner. Deeds of heroism take place 
in tenement rooms, and big hearts beat under the cheapest, 
sorriest raiment. If an actress can interest the people, 
make them laugh or make them cry, they'll love her, even 
if she is "just plain" and hasn't a Petrova profile, Madge 
Kennedy eyes or Mary Pickford curls. 

A Club for Studio Girls 

From Los Angeles comes word that Louise Huff has 
been elected president of the Studio Club of Hollywood. 
Further information states: "This club is an organization 
formed for the benefit of studio girls, providing them with 
a place to live, in an atmosphere of good cheer and home- 
like surroundings. They have a knitting night, an evening 
is devoted to making surgical dressings and bandages for 
the Red Cross, but the real big time is Saturday evening, 
when open house is kept for the soldiers and sailors, an 
old-fashioned dance enjoyed, and entertainment offered by 
prominent motion picture stars." This worthy organiza- 
tion certainly deserves the support of all those who have 
the best interests of the motion picture industry at heart. 
The club is to be congratulated in having such a charming 
little president. 

Why Failures Strew the Starry Way 

Mildred Cram, in the Theatre Magazine, maintains that 
the photodrama, although "provoking, uneven and for the 
most part inexpertly handled," is as much an art as the 
spoken drama. To support her contention, she points as 
evidence to Mrs. Fiske, Ethel Barrymore, Laura Hope 
Crews, Emily Stevens and Viola Allen as having "failed 
utterly (in the screen drama), in spite of their intelligence 
and magnetism, to accomplish what Mary Pickford, who is 
an unskilled actress behind the footlights, accomplishes 
unerringly before the camera." Miss Cram names such 
stage stars as "Tree, Maude, Faversham, Sothern and 
Daly" as being failures in the cinema, as also "such pro- 
fessional fun-makers as Sam Bernard, Raymond Hitchcock 
and Eddie Foy." She says, referring to these artists from 
the stage who ha rj failed to "register" on the screen, that 
"their shadow selves have ogled and grimaced, writhed 
and languished strutted and wept, and no one has been 
impressed or mcVed." 

A few reasons why these stars have failed so utterly 
before the camera might be .--tated, in justice to both the 
motion picture and to the stage star. Current Opinion, in 
common with the majority of opinions, is partly right and 
just as partly wrong in stating that "the reason, of course, 
lies largely in the fact that motion pictures have nothing 
to do with the magic of the living voice, the magnetism of 
the living flesh, unsoftened by skipping spotlights and other 
accessories native to the stage. ' ' 

Please notice, first, stage stars who have failed: De 
Wolf Hopper. This star of old-time comic-opera fame 
failed on the screen, because his voice was his principal 



asset. He was well handled in pictures, but the best hand- 
ling in the world cannot give screen value to the voice. 
The failure in this instance belongs to the producers. 
They certainly should have had sense enough to know that 
De Wolf Hopper would be no money-maker in filmdom. 
They were experienced producers, but they relied solely on 
an established name to bring success. Eddie Foy's experi- 
ence with the movies is rather amusing to relate. It seems 
that Mack Sennett, who engaged him and also directed 
him, worked as a chorus man in Eddie Foy's own show at 
the Casino Theater, New York. Sennett, in fact, came di- 
rectly to the Biograph, where he began his motion picture 
career, from Eddie Foy's chorus. It was pretty hard for 
Foy to take direction from his former chorus man, but 
when he was told that he didn't know how to act — that was 
too much for the Foy temperament! Is it any wonder 
some pictures are a mess? Is it any wonder stage stars 
fail on the screen, and isn't it rather funny, why? I 
wouldn't like to say George Cohan failed in pictures with- 
out seeing more of his work. "Broadway Jones," his in- 
troductory picture, did not give him much of an oppor- 
tunity. The story and direction could have been better. 
Willie Collier, as delightful a comedian as there is on the 
stage to day, failed utterly in the movies. Either he had 
poor direction or he would not take direction. It is hard 
sometimes for a clever actor and stage director to take or- 
ders from small -fry movie directors. There are certain 
rules of the trade that the camera man's lowly second 
assistant could tell to even a Bernhardt, and they must be 
observed. Jack Barrymore would have become a popular 
movie hero, with another Fairbanks following, had he per- 
sisted. However, he was in pictures one week and on the 
stage the next, and jumping in and out that way doesn't 
help to establish one with the movie fans. 

Those Who Have Registered Success 

As to the dramatic stars who have made good: Arnold 
Daly has a personality that is as attractive on the screen as 
it is on the stage. As he is a stage producer himself and 
a man who thinks, it is a safe bet that any motion picture 
direction given him that isn't intelligent doesn't get by. 
William Farnum is a capable actor, as telling in his work 
on the screen as on the stage. He is now better known as 
a movie actor. He has always had good stories and good 
direction, which two necessities to movie success would 
have established as favorites quite a few stage stars who 
have seemingly failed. William S. Hart is now a movie 
star of such magnitude that many no doubt really think 
his only dramatic experience has been with the movies. 
He, however, was the original Messala, in "Ben-Hur," and 
his greatest stage success was as Cash Hawkins, in "The 
Squaw Man." His last part on the stage was as old Jud 
Tolliver, in "The Trail of the Lonesome Pine." He re- 
ceived his training under old Daniel Bandman, a German 
tragedian who toured in one-night stands and helped to es- 
tablish such stars as Julia Marlowe and Viola Allen. He 
was a very melodramatic actor on the stage, and his high- 
est salary was possibly two hundred per week. Hart is es- 
sentially a movie actor. He has "screen personality" and 
has succeeded through sustained good work. William 
Faversham had everything in his favor for screen success. 




He made his first appearance (and 
only one, I believe) in a screen- 
proof story, Sir Gilbert Parker's 
"The Right of Way." It was the 
most cruelly butchered manuscript 
ever screened. The scenario 
couldn't have been worse, nor 
could the direction, nor could Mr. 
Faversham, in my judgment. He 
seemed to be amused at it all — as 
if saying to himself: "Well, I've 
got myself into this, and I'll go 
through with it. They're paying 
me well." His was an unneces- 
sary failure, probably due to 
indifference, when he first saw 
"movies in the making" and the 
general incompetence surrounding 
the production of the picture a 

Some say Sir Herbert Tree failed in "Macbeth," but I 
do not think so. It was a beautiful production, and Sir 
Herbert gave a splendid screen performance of the charac- 
ter of Macbeth. It was rather a failure of William Shake- 
speare. His works to-day are no more popular on the stage 
than they are in the cinema. As sterling an actor as Nat 
Goodwin failed completely on the screen. He really has 
been put to no fair test as to whether he has screen possi- 
bilities or not. "Oliver Twist" was not directed by the 
most competent man. One cannot say Nat Goodwin failed 



. 




Mary MacLane is controlled by many moods 

in ' 'Men Who Have Made Love to Me. ' ' 

Is it Walt Whitman she studies so 

intently ? He said, you know, 

"I celebrate myself." 



sorry miscalculation. 



had a chance to prove himself. 
Sidney Drew has had a remarkably 
brilliant career, both on the vaude- 
ville stage in clever sketches 
written by his first wife, Gladys 
Rankin, and in motion "pictures in 
a line of domestic comedies. He 
was always a better actor than his 
half-brother, John Drew, who was 
a matinee idol in the old days at 
Daly's, when there were such 
things as matinee idols and woman 
suffrage wasn't with us. Sidney 
Drew is an all-round clever writer, 
producer, speaking actor and 
movie star. 

Of the younger screen stars, 
Charles Ray's experience is of in- 
terest. He was an obscure Dutch comedian playing "small 
time" in cheap vaudeville houses on the Pacific coast. He 
was fortunate in affiliating with a good company and stay- 
ing with it. George Beban used to play eccentric comedy 
parts, Frenchmen in Lew Fields productions. He was. a 
clever stage actor, but "nothing like" what he is as a cin- 
ema actor. He has had good direction and stories. He 
possibly helps direct his own pictures. Fairbanks's history 
is too well known to need to be told here. Had he re- 
mained on the stage, he would own fewer Liberty Bonds. 
Julian Eltinge, always in my mind a freak attraction, 



simply because he appeared in a bad picture. He has never has been equally successful in the movies and on the stage. 




PARAMOUNT — POSED EXCLUSIVELY FOR FILM FUN 



PHOTO BY VICTOR GEOR3 



Elsie Ferguson's acting for the screen is like a " Song Without Words "; none are needed. Grace, beauty 

and sympathy are gifts with which Mother Nature dowered her, but she has achieved full command 

of all these through conscientious study and a love for hard work. Some of her views on 

the value of the "silent drama" are given in her article on the opposite page. 




PARAMOUNT 



The weird, appealing beauty of Miss Ferguson in "Rose of the World" holds the casual spectator 

captivated, and thrills the intelligent as no spoken word could do. Nor is her charm of the baby 

doll type. One need not know the story of the play to appreciate the "bit" here pictured. 

Advantages of the Screen Over the Stage 

A Comparison and a Prophecy M r /th Some Comments by the Way 

By Elsie Ferguson 



TOO MUCH enthusiasm is often quite as mislead- 
ing as too little, yet I can truthfully say that per- 
sonally I like the so-called "silent" drama very 
much more than the legitimate stage. This, the 
point of view of the player, is, of course, only one aspect 
of the comparison which I hope to make between stage and 
screen work; yet to me it is naturally the most important, 
so I will take it up first. One must consider the question, 
too, from the angle of the director — perhaps most of all — 
and from the viewpoint of the public. 

First, I want to clear up a mistaken impression enter- 
tained by many — that screen players do not learn their 
parts, that screen drama is literally the ' ' silent' ' drama. 
This is not the fact. Each player learns his lines as care- 
fully as if he were to speak them on the stage, but with the 
difference that they need be studied only one at a time, or 
just the words to fit the scene need be learned for the tak- 
ing of that scene. Personally I find that this gives far 
greater spontaneity than in stage work, where one of the 
hardest tasks of a player is to give his words freshness and 
spontaneity, when he must repeat them over and over daily 
for months. Also, I always say my lines aloud, giving 
exactly the emphasis and stress that I would for a stage 



performance. I understand that this method is not fol- 
lowed by all stars, some of whom merely repeat the words 
to themselves. Most all of them, however, follow my 
procedure. 

The variety of screen work, its ever-varying fields and 
the broad scope available for each star, is obvious and need 
not be touched upon. The screen work that I have enjoyed 
the most, and to which I have consequently been able to 
give my best effort, has been in out-of-door scenes such as 
a stage director could not hope to rival. 

The personal side, of course, enters into this equation 
of mine, and I am sure anyone who has ever tried both 
stage and screen will agree when I say that the latter is 
vastly more desirable, and for many reasons. First of all, 
there is the fact that it is healthier. One is able to keep 
fairly regular hours, and one's evenings are free. For ex- 
ample, I am able to live at home most of the time, the in- 
frequent trips coming just often enough to be a real pleas- 
ure, not comparable to the wearying travel of a "touring" 
stage production. I have my luncheon prepared at my 
home and sent to the studio every day, and so avoid the 
restaurant food which would be my lot otherwise. This sat- 
isfies me and meets Mr. Hoover's strictest demands as well. 




PARAHOUST-ARTCBAFT 



HARTSOOK PHOTO 



Mary Pickford has been familiarizing herself with 

California out-doors for some of the breezy 

scenes in "M'liss," her next picture, 



Maurice Tourneur, who directed the marvelous produc- 
tion of "The f Blue Bird," from Maeterlinck's famous play, 
and who is now directing me in a screen version of Ibsen's 
"A Doll's House," is a screen "fan" like myself. He, of 
course, looks at the matter from quite a different angle, 
yet I agree with him in all he says. We were discussing 
"The Blue Bird" the other day and its adaptability for the 
screen, in spite of the discouraging prophecies of many 
film folk. Mr. Tourneur, in speaking of his one-time 
teacher, the late Auguste Rodin, said the French master 
had believed "The Blue Bird" would come to the screen 
in time, when a director with a knowledge of symbolic 
values, a keen grasp of all the arts and a vivid imagination, 
could be found to produce it. 

"A Doll's House," at first, seemed quite as ambitious 
an undertaking as "The Blue Bird," so subtle is Ibsen's 
style, so dependent upon whispered conferences and key- 
words which unlock the subconscious, half-said truths. 
Mr. Tourneur, however, is a master of illusion, of atmos- 
phere and fantasies, and his ambition is to make the screen 
as expressive of the finest, subtlest thought and emotion as 
great music, inspired poetry or lyric prose. He has ex- 
panded Ibsen's meaning to the full circumference of his 
thought, and I believe that, thanks to him, "A Doll's 
House" is receiving a finer expression than it has ever had 
before. 

Having had a varied and interesting career, beginning 
in Paris, where he was first a decorator and designer, and 
carrying him on to an association with Rodin, the greatest 
of modern sculptors, and with Puvis de Chavannes, the 
mural painter, Mr. Tourneur has had ample opportunity to 
compare the stage and screen from a purely artistic point 
of view. He has worked on the speaking stage, having ap- 
peared with Madame Rejane, touring South America, Eng- 
land, Spain, Portugal, Italy and parts of Africa. Like 
myself, however, he has turned to the screen for the fullest 
achievement of his career, and, like me, he believes in it 
as the most mobile medium for artistic expression. 

The third and most important phase of a comparison, 
between the stage and screen is, of course, the point of 
view of the public. This has been most often touched 
upon, as it concerns everyone— those of us who are "screen 
fans" and the few remaining so-called "highbrows," or 
persons who have either not given the films a chance to- 
justify themselves or who have been unfortunate in seeing 
some of the poor films which, in spite of repeated efforts 
on the part of all screen folk, still persist in cropping out. 

But nearly everyone is willing to be taught the error of 
his viewpoint in this respect, and most people will admit 
that their prejudices are based on a misconception. "The 
Blue Bird," I should think, would be a final argument for 
those few persons who do not yet care for motion pictures. 
Anyone who has seen it can never forget the impression of 
beauty, of profound truths forced home by sheer symbolism 
and images that, as they flick over the screen, form each a 
perfect picture worthy a master's canvas. 

The matter of expense is important to everyone in these 

war days. Rich and poor alike are attempting, more or 

less successfully, to cut expenses. What better place to 

start than on the ' ' amusement' ' budget? The great theaters. 

(Continued in advertising section) 



E D 



O R 



The Public Is Responsible 

A GOODLY number of independent producers have 
recently entered the motion picture industry. 
This would indicate that the association formed 
during the first of the year to promote direct 
dealing has found favor. A good many producing concerns 
could be maintained for a long time with the amount of 
money which hitherto has been absorbed by the middle- 
men, who really contributed nothing to the enterprise. If 
only all concerned will insist 
that the standard of plays is 
what it should be, a long 
stride ahead will have been 
taken. Unfortunately, the ad- 
venturer into film producing 
has as little to guide him as 
the "forty-niners" who made 
a mad rush for the gold fields 
on insufficient information. 
Because of this lack of knowl- 
edge, the trail they traveled 
was marked for many years 
by their bleached bones, and 
in like manner the financial 
skeleton of many a worthy 
and ambitious picture pro- 
moter is apt to be all that is 
left to indicate his contribu- 
tion to the development of 
the picture industry. With 
the aid of the sixth sense to 
influence his choice of scena- 
rios, and the application of 
plain business principles, 
there is a greater chance to- 
day for success than there has 
ever been — not the meteoric 
sort of bonanza days, but the 
sure, safe, sane, cause-and- 
effect kind of success that will 
prove a lasting satisfaction. 

A Harmful Phrase 

HAVING at heart the 
best interests of a 
great enterprise, 
Film Fun wants to 
enter a protest against the 
phrase, heard constantly in 
connection with almost every 
department of the industry — 
' ' nobody knows " It is prob- 
ably true enough. Nobody 
knows how much help the 
stars have given, and are giv- 
ing, to the Liberty Loan, the 
Red Cross, War Savings, ben- 
efits general and special, and 




other causes, not to mention the very large number of men, 
in actual war service. How many people are engaged — 
whether two million or a few thousand are involved — no- 
body knows. But somebody ought to know. Somebody 
ought to find out and see to it that credit is given where 
credit is due. It isn't fair to the workers who give so 
generously of their time, substance and initiative, and it 
isn't fair to the industry as a whole that they should lose the 
honor rightly theirs. And, on the other hand, it isn't fair 
that shirkers and slackers, whose plan is "to let George 

do it," should be aided in 
their undertaking by the state- 
ment, "Nobody knows." 
Some justification for the ex- 
isting state of affairs is found 
in the rapidity with which the 
industry has grown. It ranks, 
fifth in the industries of the, 
country and is as intimately 
related to all our doings as^ 
the steel industry. 



1 



Original Music for 
Photoplays 



P 



PARAMOUNT 



Douglas Fairbanks says "Ginger" proved a good 

comrade and enjoyed the trip and the hard work 

when the company was out in the Arizona desert 

filming " Headin' South." Who knows but 

that some day with his master's help Ginger 

may take part in a picture presentation 

of the great Alaskan drama in which 

the malamutes have played such an 

exciting and wonderful part. 



lROPHESYING is alto-, 
gether out of vogue, 
and in days when it. 
flourished it was not- 
ably without honor; but, nev- 
ertheless, we would foretell 
that the time must come soon, 
when an original score will 
have to be written for every 
play that is to attain worth- 
while success. Appropriate 
music is essential. Anyone 
who has seen the photoplay, 
"My Own United States," in, 
which Arnold Daly is star,, 
has had it hammered home to, 

his inner consciousness how 
much music may mean to the 
silent drama, for the action is. 
strengthened, upborne and at 
times made to approach the : 
majestic by the musical 
accompaniment. This film 
version of "The Man Without 
a Country" - meets the need| 
for an awakening of the love 
of country, and anyone who 
sees and hears it is quick to, 
feel the response from all 
around him. Producers should 
make original music a part of 
every feature film. The effect 
would be worth much more ; 
than the cost. 




PARAMOUNT 



HARTSOOK PHOTO 



Kathleen Clifford says that this honest-to-goodness old-fashioned gown, created many years ago for one oj 

her ancestors, proves they knew as much in olden times as the most modern of us concerning 

what to wear and how to wear it. Appearances seem to justify Miss Clifford's belief. 




Pearl White is discussing with Howard Chandler Christy, the artist, some details of her 

next serial "The House of Hate," a play destined, she believes, to inspire us all to 

earnest endeavor in war work by revealing Germany's many treacheries. 



Why I Want to Work for Uncle Sam 

What a Dainty Movie Actress is Doing to Help Win the War 

By Pearl White 



c 



I 



F THE United States of America are worth living 
in, they are worth fighting for ! ' ' 

I believe I do not make a false claim when I 

. say that I used these words before they had been 

carried to the four corners of our great country on a now 

famous recruiting poster, and I know that no other phrase 

could so satisfactorily express my own conviction. 

I have made what money I possess out of the greatness 
and bounty of my country. 

I have carved my career out of the rock of America. 

I have built what happiness the Supreme Power has 
permitted me to attain, out of the beauty of her fields, the 
majesty of her mountains, the bigness of her cities. 

America has been my land of opportunity; the Ameri- 
can people have made it possible for me to realize the 
fruits of that opportunity. 

What kind of a woman would I be were I not ready at 
any time to make sacrifices for the sake of the flag that 
symbolizes all for which America stands, if I should shirk 
any responsibility placed upon me through my allegiance 
to the country now so great and now on the threshold of 
more wonderful achievements than the world has yet known ! 

On several occasions I have offered my personal services 
in whatever capacity they would be useful. I would and 
could drive an ambulance or a truck, or, with training, an 



aeroplane. But I have been told that many others can do 
the same, that women had best not risk becoming a liabil- 
ity in Europe, that I can do more valuable work by simply 
"putting everything I've got" into making more photo- 
plays and better photoplays, not only for the millions at 
home, but for the hundreds of thousands abroad. So be it. 

I want to do what Uncle Sam tells me to do. I want to 
work for him, because I stand wholeheartedly and unre- 
servedly behind him in this war. I believe it will prove 
the test. by fire from which America, till now a mighty 
thing of rough iron, will emerge as tempered steel. 

I am often pointed out as typifying the American spirit, 
but I do not believe many people know that my father was 
an Irishman, born here, and my mother a Corsican from 
the land of Napoleon. Since I was a wee kid I have been 
conscious of my Americanism. I don't know what has 
made me feel it deeply. Nobody ever told me; but the 
consciousness was there — just something inside me. 

That is what this war is going to do for every man and 
woman in America, no matter where he or she was born. 
It will awaken them to a consciousness of being American. 
It will make them appreciate the fact. It will make 
the colors of all the national emblems represented in our 
polyglot population dissolve into the Red, White and Blue, 
because they will have been privileged to make sacrifices 



for tUe emblem in a great cause — and what real good ever 
came to anyone who did not give up something to make 
himself worthy to receive it? 

When the authorities asked me to pose for a war poster 
by Howard Chandler Christy, I was glad to do so. 

When the navy officers asked me to aid them in stimu- 
lating recruiting, I rode a beam from the pavement in 
Forty-second Street to the twenty-second story of a build- 
ing then being constructed. A crowd gathered, and I dis- 
tributed navy pamphlets, made a speech, and according to 
the officers helped the game along. I was pleased to be of 
service. 

When the Liberty Loan drive came, I made in one night 
a circuit of twenty-one theaters in New York as a Four- 
Minute " Man, " and I'll do it again when the next loan is on. 

When the income tax came, I was glad to pay my share 
of it — anything the government thinks I should pay. It's 
doing my bit. 



When my chauffeur said he'd like to enlist immediately 
after America went in, I did all I could to help him, though 
he had been with me for years and was the best man I ever 
saw in his line. Through friends I got him into aviation. 
He made good and is now "somewhere in France" with a 
commission. 

If arrangements can be made, I want to help in the big 
propaganda play now being projected. 

If the government wants me for a propaganda picture, 
I'll play a maid with two scenes, while somebody else has 
the "big stuff." If Uncle Sam says so, that is all there is 
to it. I am ready here and now, and at any time, for 
anything that the Big Boss wants me to do. 




A 



H 



B 



K 



Some News Nuggets and Critical Quips 



NO NEED to worry over this year's supply of pep- 
per ! Fay Tincher is back in the pictures. 
Warner Oland is urging everyone to come 
across for the Red Cross, so as to give the iron 
cross the double cross. 

It is hinted that Creighton Hale is so tired of serials 
that he eschews all his old-time favorite breakfast foods. 

"The forbidden path" does not refer to the one leading 
to the coal bin. That's all over with — until next winter. 

James Russell has a kick coming, but he can't land it. 
He broke his ankle during the fight scene in "The Girl 
Who Dared." 

Edna Goodrich wears a million dollars' worth of dry 
goods in "Who Loved Him Best?" At least, it so appears 
to the average he. 

Mabel Normand has a brilliant new photoplay, "Dodg- 
ing a Million." Huh! in these hard times we wouldn't 
even dodge a dollar. 

"Kindling" has been filmed, and a Minneapolis exhib- 
itor who has booked it wants to know "what's the use of 
kindling if you ain't got no coal?" 

Tom Forman has enlisted in the army ; Edward Earle 
has joined the aviation corps; Will Munchoff has just got 
married. How brave American men are! 

Ethel Teare never has aei photo taken in a bathing 
suit. She says there are two reasons. None of our busi- 
ness, Ethel, but what's wrong with 'em? 

Mary MacLane has hurled herself into the screen in 
"Men Who Have Made Love to Me." We are anxious to 
learn her verdict on J. Warren Kerrigan. 

We asked our coal dealer to attend a performance with 
us of Paramount's "The Guilty Man." He refused, saying 
the pictures were getting too darned personal. 

Peggy Hyland lost her dog, "Jackpot," that she brought 



from England, and it was a long time before he was found. 
A great many screen actors have lost jackpots that were 
never recovered. 

Hooray ! At last we are to have ' ' Mickey' ' and Mabel 
Normand in her sawed -off overalls and Chaplinesque shoes! 
Ah, as the poet says: "Rags are royal raiment when worn 
on Mabel's shape!" 

William S. Hart, in "An Apostle of Vengeance," made 
such a splendid impression as a minister that a Western 
church sent him a call. However, they made such a noise 
in the studios that Hart couldn't hear it. 

It is rumored that the title to the book Mary Pickford 
is wiiting will be "How To Live on a Hundred Thousand 
Dollars a Year." She maintains that, with present prices 
and such an income, one might with strict-economy have 
pie twice a week. 

The "less" day habit is spreading. Artcraft will pro- 
duce a starless play. It is called ' ' The Whispering Chorus, ' ' 
and although the cast contains the monickers of several 
well-known stars, they will not be featured. This innova- 
tion will be as welcome to the stars as the Kaiser would be 
in Paris. 

What They Missed 

They boast about the ancient days, 
In rounded prose and solemn lays; 
But I just wink my eye, you see, 
For that stuff don't go down with me. 
The gods of Greece were awful slow — 
They never saw a picture show. 

Along with a consignment of pictures of the "Beauty 
Brigade" comes the information that Venice, Cal., held 
its annual bathing-suit contest recently, and the entire 
male population of Southern California volunteered to offi- 
ciate as judges. Only bookkeepers were selected, how- 
ever. They were used to figures, and therefore able to 
keep their mind on the job. 




VITAGRAPB 



CHARLOTTE FAIRCHILD PHOTO 



Alice Joyce is starring in a series of Robert W. Chambers photoplays. "The Business of Life," 

soon to be released, is apparently pleasant and absorbing, if we may jvdge by the lilies 

and the rapt unbusiness-like appearance of Alice. 



Microscopic Movie Marvels 

How Invisible Atoms are Made to Prance on the Screen Like Wild Animals 

By Horace -D. Ashton 




(Insert) Horace D. Ashton. 
At work in the studio, with 

SO FAR as I know, mine 
is one of the few suc- 
cessful experiments 
in the taking of mo- 
tion pictures of micro-or- 
ganisms, and the first to 
follow a continuity in the 
scenarios. If audiences find 
the films a tithe as interest- 
ing as I have found the mak- 
ing of them, my efforts will 
have been worth while. And 
the undertaking is by no 
means simple, as you shall 
see. 

I arrange a sort of scen- 
ario in which the species 
to be filmed is permitted to 
work out his life story. In 
each case the problem of 
sustenance seems to dominate. Take, if you please, a 
"Vorticella" or bell anamalculae; the bell, which re- 
sembles a lily-of-the-valley, swings at the end of a 
contractile stem with which it fastens itself to other 
objects. The edge of the bell is fringed with cilia — fine, 
hair-like projections — which create a current in the 
water, thus attracting its food. 

To secure this and similar motion pictures, the ob- 



Beavers building a dam in the North woods. 




Actino Sphaerium digesting young cyclops which he has 
devoured. 



stage set, camera ready, his 
actors under the microscope. 

ject, magnified many diam- 
eters, plays its part in a field 
of action one-one-hundredths 
of an inch in width. The 
performer takes up a large 
portion of this space, and in 
one jump may move clear 
out of the field of observa- 
tion. To manipulate the 
field with one hand while 
cranking the camera with 
the other is not an under- 
taking in which one can 
perfect himself in one les- 
son. When I am at work, 
the performer is magnified 
only two hundred, four hun- 
dred or eight hundred diam- 
eters, according to the power 
of the objective; but the mo- 
tion picture projecting machine magnifies the film about one 
hundred and forty-four diameters, which must be multi- 
plied by the four hundred or eight hundred aforesaid to 
get at the fact, and that is that the picture you see on the 
screen of microscopic life is magnified some thirty thou- 
sand diameters or more. 

I have been fortunate in securing the friendly co- 
operation of men of high standing and authority, such as 



Dr. Roy W. Minor, assistant curator 
of the Department of Invertebrate 
Zoology, Museum of Natural History, 
New York, who assisted in filming the 
microscopic pond life; Frank E. Lutz, 
curator of the Department of Ento- 
mology of the American Museum of 
Natural History, in photographing 
insect life; and Dr. E. P. Felt, New 
York State entomologist, who has 
specialized on foes to plant life, such 
as the alder blight, and others. A 
great deal of my success is due, too, 
to the tireless energy and enthusiasm 
of my associate, J. James De Vyver, 
arboriculturalist. 

My actors are temperamental, 
too. Like other motion picture stars, 
they sulk at times, for no reason I, as 
director of the action, can fathom. 
Light seems to affect their move- 
ments. A ray too much of red in- 
toxicates and inspires them to eccen- 
tric behavior, but -a blue light seems 
to restore them to sanity and orderli- 
ness. All of these little animals live 
in cold water, and as the quantity 
used is about what you could lift on 
the point of a pin, the direct rays of 
light which the camera requires can 
be allowed to play on the field but a 
few seconds at a time, else heat pros- 
tration will overtake the performers. 

The utility of motion pictures such 
as these may be inferred from the 
"stills" from a late release, which 
we may call "The House Fly's Re- 
venge. *' It shows how this villain 
wrecks homes and destroys families. 
I am asked to accept a scenario in 
which "Jersey Skeeter" shall play 
the lead, and probably this will be on 
the screen Defore summer. Plays like 
this are easier to stage. The actors 
are magnified only about five hundred 
diameters. Individuality has oppor- 
tunity that isn't possible in a mob 
scene such as seems inevitable when 
you consider that in a drop of water 
there are approximately fifty thousand 
animalcule. 

I am asked sometimes to explain 
how it happens that I, for many years 
a globe-trotter and adventurer, a war 
correspondent throughout the Russo- 
Japanese War, and an explorer for a 
number of years, find this work so 
absorbing and inspiring. "What's 
the use of it all?" people want to 
know. Well, it is a good thing to 
learn to distinguish friends from en- 








^*fe 




AEGUS PICTORIAL 



1. The foot of a fly, magnified 400 diam- 
eters. 2. Tongue of the common house 
fly, magnified 400 diameters. 3. Bud 
hydra. This species reproduces by 
branching out thus from the parent. 4. 
Stylonichia, magnified 1600 diametres. 
5. Hydra rividis. A severed tentacle 
develops into a complete organism, mag- 
nified to some WO diameters- 



emies, and that I can teach. The 
constructive vastly out number the 
destructive in the micro-organisms. 
Take, for instance, the nematodes. 
More than a score of distinct species 
are concerned at all times in main- 
taining us in health. Bacteria mul- 
tiply in much the same way and run 
their life cycle with about the same 
speed the bacilli do, and just now if 
the dangers of entertaining unawares 
the pneumococcus and the diplococcus 
are known, and the beneficent activ- 
ities of those friendly little folks, 
these silent guardians, are so under- 
stood that we can avail ourselves of 
their aid, many a case of pneumonia 
or diphtheria can be warded off. The 
fresh-water hydra makes an interest- 
ing scenario along these lines. His 
favorite food, plenteously partaken, 
keeps the water he inhabits in good 
condition. Of course, when it comes 
to visualizing the animals on which 
he feeds, fine work is required; but 
it has been done, as the picture of the 
Actino Sphaerium shows. 

But microscopic life is only one 
feature of the Argus programs. 
Among interesting industries we dis- 
covered that the process of gold beat- 
ing — making the tissue sheets of pure 
gold, used the world over in many 
industries, but most familiar to us in 
the dentist's work — is the same now 
as when perfected by Persian beaters 
some eight hundred years ago. The 
film shows every step of this process, 
from the brick as it leaves the smel- 
ter, through the ingot, to the finish- 
ed sheet, which is one-three-hun- 
dred-thousandth of an inch in thick- 
ness. 

Anyone who wants to know just 
how a dam should be built and how 
the work can be accomplished in 
record time will enjoy the picture 
made not long ago, when we were 
able to film the home building of a 
colony of beavers engaged in the 
construction of a village. 

I find in my work, more and more 
every day and all day long, that Ste- 
venson was right when he wrote: 

"The world is so full of a number of 

things, 
I am sure we should all be as happy 

as kings." 




EDISOW 



In this scene from "Aliens" Kiki-San seems to think the answer to the riddle of life may be read in her tea-cup. 

The Evolution of a Star 

How One Ambitious Little Girl Was Made Over for the Movies 

By SHIRLEY MASON 



WHEN Mr. Frederick A. Collins visited the Edison 
Studio to arrange for the production of 
"Seven Deadly Sins,'' he did 
the honor of selecting me for 
the principal feminine role. 

"Who is that girl?" he asked 
Mr. McChesney, the manager. 

"Leonie Flugrath," was the 
reply. 

Mr. Collins stepped up to 
me. "I admire your person- 
ality and methods," he said 
smilingly, "but I don't like 
your name. Will you change 
it?" 

"Certainly I will, to get a 
stellar part!" I returned, the 
novel idea winning me like a 
flash. He just as promptly replied. 
"You are Shirley Mason now!" ; 
Shirley Mason I have stayed ever since. 

I suppose Mr. Collins had been read- 
ing the Bronte sisters' novels and found 
"Shirley" rather pleasant browsing. At 




EDISON 

Ceremonial costume in 
cherry-blossom land. 



any rate, he had the name ready coined before entering 
the studio, knew of my work in "The Poor Little 
Rich Girl," and had mentally selected me to 
pposite George Le Guere, prior to 
■ introduction. 

I am now very fond of the appel- 
lation "Shirley Mason," though 
for quite a while it gave me a 
queer sense of dual personal- 
ity. You see, I had been 
identified with "Leonie Flu- 
grath" so long — ever since, 
in fact, I created the part 
of Little Hal for William 
Faversham in "The Squaw 
Man." That was at the ma- 
ture age of three and a half 
or four years. You had to be 
seven years old to play here then, 
I played the part in Buffalo, 
where "The Squaw Man" opened. 

From Little Hal I progressed to the role 
of Meenie in Joe Jefferson's "Rip Van 
Winkle," and later appeared for a whole 



season with Richard Bennett in " Passersby. ' ' There 
were three of us Flugrath sisters, Edna, Viola and 
myself, ^11 child actresses on the speaking stage. I 
remember how delighted I was to succeed Viola in 
the name part of ' ' The Poor Little Rich Girl. ' ' She 
had been the "road" star of the play for a year when 
other work claimed her; this gave me the opportu- 
nity to head the show for a season in the ' ' provinces. ' ' 

Like Mary Pickford, Lillian and Dorothy Gish 
and some others, we grew into stardom from infancy ; 
when the film field opened, we were acquainted with 
every angle of stage art and could adapt ourselves 
more readily .to the kindred art of the motion pic- 
ture. A glance at the life histories of the leading 
picture stars — I mean particularly the girl stars — 
shows that a large proportion are the stage children 
of five, ten or fifteen years back. 

I followed Viola in the films just as I had done in 
the case of "The Poor Little Rich Girl." We were 
all living in that part of New York called the Bronx, 
and my sister was playing at the Edison Studio. At 
her request I accompanied her one day and was put 
on as an "extra." From "standing back of the 
crowd and yelling," in pictures, I was soon advanced 
to small parts, and subsequently to leading ones. My 
first "regular" picture was "The Little Saleslady." 
Eddie Taylor was my first director, but perhaps I am 
best remembered in support of Ann Murdock in 
"Where Love Is." Anyhow, when Viola left, I 
evolved into the Edison's leading woman, and thence 
to "stock" star, thanks to Mr. Collins's selection of 
me for the McClure morality series. 

One of my pleasantest recent tasks was the title 
role of "The Appletree Girl." It was a big change 
from this "homey" rural character to the distinc- 
tively Japanese part of Kiku-San in Mr. McChesney's 
six-reel feature, "Aliens," which we have just com- 
pleted under Mr. Bernard J. Durning's direction. 

My role is that of a Jap girl who marries an 
American college boy out in Tokyo, and then sepa- 
rates from him under the dictation of her brother. 
For the last three months I have been practically liv- 
ing in a corner of old Japan, built with the aid of 
Japanese-American artists in our big, glass-roofed 
studio. The costumes in this picture are wonderful; 
there are fourteen of them, harmonized and fitted 
by a Japanese designer, and several of them are ex- 
tremely costly. 

I often look back on our childish stage experience 
and reflect upon the unimagined changes that have 
been brought about. My oldest sister is Mrs. Harold 
Shaw, wife of the American director who is making 
pictures in South Africa; Viola Flugrath is Viola 
Dana, the Metro star; and I — am Shirley Mason. 
Each attained her stellar ambition, but if the Rip 
Van Winkle of my early "trouping" days should 
come back to life, he would be hard put to it to find 
any trace of the vanished "Flugrath girls." 




The ways and wiles of a Spanish dancer have changed 
little from those that prevailed in the days of the 
Dons. Edith Story is fascinating in the inter- 
pretation she gives in "The Claim." 



but 



The Blue Bird for Happiness 



HAPPINESS is at a premium 
in war times. With heart 
and pocketbook overbur- 
dened, there has never been 
a time when gladness was needed so 
much as now. With every ear attuned 
for tidings of peace, as well as for the 
Easter resurrection anthem, it' was* 
happy foresight which moved the pro- 
ducers to present "The Blue Bird" at 
this opportune time, for the loveliness 
of childhood and its steadfast faith in 
the miraculous may bring new hope 
and courage to a war-weary world. 
Lovers of Maeterlinck's master - 




" Prunella" and "The Seven Swans," 
if it isn't a fact that "the kingdom" 
must be sought in the blithe spirit of 
childhood ? 

Can you imagine how this pic- 
ture is likely to impress the fighting 
men to whom it may be shown in the 
little theaters behind the lines "Over 
There"? Could the Easter message 
come in more acceptable fashion or 
at a better time? Nature's true balance 
must include a provision for spiritual 
comfort, and out of all this horror 
the pursuit of the Blue Bird offers a 
pathway for Peace, the only king this 




piece have nothing to fear from the 
film version; it follows with fidelity 
the original. And all of us who have 
faith in the films will rejoice that a 
director has been found who can and 
does make photoplays in which one 
finds the spirit which animates true 
art, whether it be painting, sculpture, 
music or the drama. Picture plays, 
when they come into their own, will 
include all these arts, and will pre- 
sent the vision all of us follow in our 
quest for happiness — fitfully, it may 
be, but always more or less faithfully. 
Why do we all respond so joyfully to 
"Peter Pan," "The Blue Bird," 



(Top panel) Tyltyl and Mytyl, in 
their quest, have reached the gate- 
way to "Beautiful Memory Land." 
(Centre) Quaking, little wanderers 
filled with fear but dauntless in 

their pursuit o e the Blue Bird. 
(Bottom circle) The homely but 

kindly old fairy ' ' Berlinghot. ' ' 

old world of ours will yield allegiance 
to hereafter. It may be Maeterlinck 
didn't consciously purpose all this, 
but so it seems to be; for every play 
that nourishes hope, courage and 
steadfastness brings nearer the glad 
morning that will see happiness caged 
for all of us. 



NLESS your body, in every department, including the mind, is 
capable ot withstanding abuse without distress, you have no 
real health, living, vital and mental power. You have but nega- 
tive health. You are well by mere accident. Real health and 
real success come only through the power to live and to succeed. 
The Swoboda character of health, vitality and energy will enable 
you to enjoy conditions that now distress you. A unique, new 
and wonderful discovery that furnishes the body and brain cells with a de- 
gree of energy that surpasses imagination. 




THERE is a new and 
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reconstructing and 
recreating the human or- 
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them a new kind of health, 
strength, energy, confi- 
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given them such marvel- 
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No Drugs or Medicines 

This new system, although it has al- 
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being can be — how overflowing with en- 
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complishes seemingly impossible results 
entirely without the use of drugs, medi- 
cines or dieting, without weights or ap- 
paratus, without violent forms of exer- 
cise, without massaging or electricity or 
cold baths or forced deep breathing — in 
fact this system does its revolutionizing 
work without asking you to do anything 
you do not like and 
neither does it ask 
you to give up any- 
thing you do 
like. And so 
wonderful are 
its results that 
you begin to feel 
renewed after 
the first five 
minutes. 

How the Cells 
Govern Life 

The body is com- 
posed of billions of 
cells. When illness 
or any other unnat- 
ural condition pre- 
vails, we must look 
to the cells for re- 
lief. When we lack 
energy and power, 
when we are list- 



Ifoir To Be a 

in 
Energy, Health 
and Mind 



j»^^.2» sW^-^-«^^ : sa'^';»*^» 



S3K»»>»VISSakV»>»>»?S»'S»>i»>i»«i 




less, when we haven't smashing, driving 
power back of our thoughts and actions, 
when we must force ourselves to meet 
our daily business and social obligations, 
when we are sick or ailing, or when, 
for any reason, we are not enjoying a 
fully healthy and happy life, it is sim- 
ply because certain cells are weak and inactive or 
totally dead. And this is true of ninety people 
out of every hundred, even among those who 
think they are well, but who are in reality miss- 
ing- half the pleasure of living. These facts and 
many others were discovered by Alois P. Swo- 
boda, and resulted in his marvelous system of 
cell-culture. 

Re-Creating Human Beings 

Swoboda has shown men and women in all 
parts of the world and in all walks of life how to 
build a keener brain, a more superb, energetic 
body, stronger muscle, a more vigorous heart, a 
healthier stomach, more active bowels, a better 
liver and perfect kidneys. He has times without 
numbershown how to overcome general debility, 
listlessness, lack of ambition; lack of vitality- 
how to revitalize, regenerate and restore every 
part of the body to its normal state — how to re- 
cuperate the vital forces, creating a type of physi- 
cal and mental super-efficiency that almost in- 
variably results in greater material benefits than 
you ever before dreamed were possible to you. 

Swoboda is only one perfect example of the 
Swoboda system. He fairly radiates vitality, his 
whole being pulsating with unusual life and 
energy. And his mind is even more alert and 
active than his body; he is tireless. Visit him, 
talk with him and you are impressed with the 
fact that you are in the presence of a remarkable 
personality, a superior product of the Swoboda 
System of body and personality building. Swo- 
boda embodies in his own super-developed mind 
and body — in his wonderful energy — the correct- 
ness of his theories and of the success of his 
methods. 

Swoboda numbers among his pupils judges, 
senators, congressmen, cabinet members, ambas- 
sadors, governors, physicians and ministers — 
workingmen as well as millionaires. 

These New Copyrighted 
Books Are Free 

"CONSCIOUS EVOLUTION" AND THE 
ENCE OF LIFE" ARE THE A B C OF 
EVOLUTION AND PERSISTENT YOUTH. 
THESE BOOKS EXPLAIN CONSCIOUS 
EVOLUTION AND THE HUMAN BODY 
AS IT HAS NEVER BEEN EXPLAINED 



BEFORE. THEY EXPLAIN 
THE SWOBODA THEORY, 
THE LAW AND THE REASON 
FOR THE EVOLUTION OF 
MIND AND BODY. 

THEY TELL HOW THE 
CELLS AND THEIR ENERGIES 
BUILD THE ORGANS AND 
THE BODY, AND HOW TO 
ORGANIZE THE CELLS BE- 
YOND THE POINT WHERE 
NATURE LEFT OFF FOR YOU, 
AND WHERE YOU AS NA- 
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SELF-EVOLUTION. 

These books will give you a bet- 
ter understanding of yourself than 
you could obtain through reading 
all of the books on all of the 
.sciences and philosophies on the 
subject of mind and body. 

" CONSCIOUS EVOLUTION " 
and "THE SCIENCE OF LIFE" 
will show you how you can in- 
crease the pleasures of life to a 
maximum — how to intensify them 
and how to make your life more 
profitable, pleasurable and joyous. 
These essays will show you the 
way to the full life, the superior life, the more sat- 
isfactory life, the lively life. They will show you 
how to overcome the inferior life, the feeble life, 
the negative life, the unsatisfactory life. 

Why Miss the Super-Pleasures 
of Life? 

"CONSCIOUS EVOLUTION" and "THE SCI- 
ENCE OF LIFE" will show you how to increase your 
pleasures and happiness to a maximum, and how to 
reduce your troubles of every character, mental, 
physical, physiological and conceptual to a minimum. 

Conscious Evolution will show you how to inten- 
sify, prolong, increase and magnify your pleasures 

"CONSCIOUS EVOLUTION" and "THE 
SCIENCE OF LIFE " will show you that you have 
not as yet experienced the real and highest pleasures 
of life, and will show you how to attain the super- 
pleasures of life. In a word, these two essays will 
reveal the startling, educating and enlightening 
secret of gigantic health and mind power. 

"CONSCIOUS EVOLUTION" and "THE 
SCIENCE OF LIFE," which Swo- 
boda has written and copyright- 
ed, will be sent you free of 
charge and free of all 
obligation to Swo- 
boda, if you will 
write for them. 

JUST WRITE 
Y0U1I NADIR AND 
ADDRESS ON THE 
CODPON, TEAR IT 
OUT AND MAIL IT 
TO SWOBODA, OR 
DRAW A RING AROUT 
TOUR NAME ON TOUR 
LETTERHEAD. OR 
MERELY SEND A POST. 
Al. (.IV INC TOUR NAME 
AND ADDRESS. DO IT 
TODAY! TOU CANNOT 
AFFORD TO LIVE AN 
INFERIOR LIFE. 

Address 

Alois P. Swoboda 

2137 Berkeley Bldg. 
New York City 








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How To Grow Thin 

(Continued from a previous page) 

Sweet Fatty : 

How can I ever tumble in the movies? 
Dramatic Harold. 

Answer : 
Dear Dram : 

Get fresh with your direclor. 

My dear Professor : 

Do you approve of tumbling on a full 
stomach? Fannie Fallin. 

Answer : 
Dear Fannie : 

Yes, but be careful on whose stomach 
you tumble. 

Dear Fatty : 

I weigh 420 pounds and do not get 
any chance to try your tumbling exer- 
cises at home. What form of tumbling 
would you suggest for a traveling sales- 
man? Sam Pell. 

Answer : 
Dear Sam : 

Travel fifty miles with the tumbling 
homes in a Kansas cyclone. 

My dear Benefactor : 

A friend of a friend of mine who 
knows your chauffeur's cousin told me 
that you reduced by dodging pies. 
How do you do it? 

Susie Meringue. 

Answer : 
My dear Susie : 

After you have dodged 120 pies, stop 
about eighty with your face, and you 
will tumble to how it is done. 

Friend Fat : 

Would it be improper for a debu- 
tante of 36, weighing 350 pounds, co 
take tumbling exercises? 

Babe De Butte. 

Answer : 
My dear Baby : 

Nothing could harm a person such 
as you describe. 

I sincerely hope my readers will 
tumble to everything I have revealed. 
Tumble in love, and you will worry 
yourself thin. Getting married will 
worry you even thinner. Of course, 
there are exceptions to this rule. 

In my next article on how to reduce, 
I will show you a sure way to grow thin 
by playing the gentle game of golf. 




Advantages of the Screen 
over the Stage 

(Continued from a previous page' 

of New York, like the Rialto, Strand 
and Rivoli, with their human lines 
reaching up and down the block at each 
performance and their frequent S. R. O. 
signs, are good examples of this. More 
and more people are attending these 
theaters. 

A great drawback to the furtherance 
of motion picture theater attendance 
has been the fact that people actually 
did not know how to distinguish their 
pictures. More often than not, simply 
by not looking up the advertisement of 
their favorite theater, they would see a 
picture that they had already seen or 
that they did not care for. Nowadays, 
however, people are coming to choose 
their motion pictures with quite as 
much discrimination as they do their 
cigars or their gloves. No man would 
think of buying just "any old" cigar, 
while most women are as careful about 
their gloves as about their hats. Why 
should anyone squander time and 
money, then, watching a poor brand of 
picture, when, by looking for the well- 
known kinds, the waste can be avoided? 

My prophecy for the future of mo- 
tion pictures is this: that the day will 
come when present conditions will be 
reversed, when the stage will draw 
upon the motion picture for its mate- 
rial, and when there will be those who 
disapprove of the stage, while giving 
their whole support to the motion pic- 
ture, so uniformly good will have be- 
come the general photoplay. Also, 
when scenario writing becomes as uni- 
versal as short-story writing, and those 
people who thoroughly understand the 
technique of the photoplay shall take 
up scenario writing, the "perfect" 
picture will have arrived. 



'M«H, 




Don't You Hate 'Em? 

By Charlotle R. Mish 

I wish there was some legal way 
To assassinate those who will say. 

"I know how this ends. 

Why, the hero intends" 

And then gives away the whole play. 



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You at the Top 

By Vera Vladimir 

I WANT to say a few words to "You" who have reached the top. No, I'm not a 
she-Billy Sunday, nor a preacher, nor a mother-in-law, nor a member of the 
Bolsheviki. I'm just an honest-to-goodness-candy-loving-theater-going-Hoover- 
ized young lady, of twenty summers and a few winters. 

You know that thing called "conscience"? Well, it has been annoying me. 
Something within me says: "Vera, you must have a little talk with those at the 
top." So I'm going to get this out of my system right away. 

You are a movie star, an artist of the silent drama. You have slaved, starved 
and reached your goal. And now you've made good. You are a somebody. I sup- 
pose I should spell that in capitals. Heavens ! It took you long enough to get to 
the top, and I know it wasn't an easy climb. 

Isn't it a wonderful feeling, movie star, to enter a restaurant, a hotel, a dining- 
room or even a drawing-room, when everyone present turns toward you, eyes fixed 
upon you? And you hear low whispers that sound like: "Oh, yes, that's. so and so, 
the movie star. A wonderful person !" Oh, joy! What a feeling ! You've experi- 
enced it, eh? And when you are getting into your motor (you, who only a few years 
back didn't know the difference between a shock absorber and a battery), and 
passers-by stop and look at you, and some even dare to smile at you. Your feelings 
then? Indescribable! 

Tell me, movie star, or director-general, or "any now-successful-once-poor- 
person," do you try to make life worth the living for people less fortunate than your- 
self? Or do you make life miserable for all those that are near you? Are you 
temperamental ? 

Mr. Director, do you remember how hard you worked to convince the "big boss" 
that you had the ability to direct pictures? All you wanted was a chance. Remem- 
ber? Of course you don't. Why think of unpleasant things? He that helped you, 
that gave you "your one big chance" — do you ever see him? Do you ever show 
your appreciation for what he has done for you? If he hadn't given you the 
"chance," would you occupy that expensive and luxurious apartment, would you 
own that peachy car, and would you know what to do with a Jap valet? What? You 
say you had it in you — all you needed was a chance? I wouldn't be so sure about 
that, Mr. Director. 

Your assistant, the fellow who does everything he possibly can to please you — 
does he receive the proper treatment from you? Do you treat him like an equal? 
Does he receive the salary he should? Do you show your appreciation of his efforts? 

Mr. Casting Director, do you treat the extras as if they were human beings? Or 
do you treat them as you would a lot of animals? Do you treat the little stage-struck 
girl as you'd want some other man to treat your sister, your wife, your mother? Or 
do you — oh, well, I hope you are man enough to treat everyone as a gentleman 
should. 

Movie queen, do you remember when you were but an extra, and your heart was 
gladdened and you were happy and encouraged for the rest of the day when the star 
smiled sweetly at you? 

How many hearts have you gladdened to-day? 

And you, head of the scenario department, do you see to it that scenarios sub- 
mitted to you are read? Or do your assistants just open the envelopes, take out the 
scripts, attach a rejection slip and slip them into addressed envelopes, to be returned 
unread? Do you treat these people squarely? Do you know that many, many rejected 
scenarios have made thousands of dollars for more conscientious film concerns? 

It is not honorable to steal ideas. Oh, yes, we all know that! Don't get angry, 
mister. Things like that have happened, and in the best of regulated film companies. 

Mr. Head of the publicity department, or Mr. Press Agent, do you think the pub- 
lic believes all you write about your star? Do you really think that people are stupid 
fools? If you make* up your mind to write something great about your star, my ad- 
vice is: Get your star to perform the great deed, then go ahead and write about it. 
I cannot help but say that some press agents have cheapened the film industry. Don't 
forget, Mr. Press Agent, what friend Abe Lincoln said: "You* can fool some of the 
people all of the time, you can fool all of the people some of the time, but you can't 
fool all of the people all of the time." 



Who's Who and Where 

The World Film Corporation has 

presented several of its photoplays to 

the United States battleship Missouri, 

for the entertainment of sailors and 

marines. 

-9- 

It is rumored that Geraldine Farrar 

will presently scintillate in Goldwyn 
pictures, and that a story of Canadian 
life and adventure of the olden time is 
likely to be among the first releases 
under the new contract. 
-?- 
Mrs. Linda A. Griffith left New York 

on March 17th for California. She 
will make a leisurely automobile tour 
of her home State, starting from Los 
Angeles, visiting studios along the way, 
and may reach Yosemite Park in time 
to record the proceedings of a motion 
picture troupe "on location" in that 
wonderful valley. Her Free Lance con- 
tributions are sure to contain much that 
is novel and of unusual interest. Her 
own breezy style of relating her im- 
pressions is well known. 

-?- 
Louise Glaum makes her first appear- 
ance as a Peralta star in Monte M. 
Katterjohn's latest play, "An Alien 
Enemy. ' ' The Fort McArthur Military 
Band furnished the music, and many 
officers were among those present at 
the pre-view, an invitation affair. Each 
member of the audience was taxed 25 
cents for the benefit of the Red Cross, 
and received a strip of film in exchange 
for the contribution. The proceeds 
amounted to $23.00, and now Bessie 
Barriscale, Henry B. Walthall and J. 
Warren Kerrigan are engaged in drum- 
ming up trade, with intent to outdo 
Miss Glaum when their pictures are 
shown. The Red Cross is wishing 
every one of them "the best of luck." 

Goodness ! 

On tenderhooks 

Am I, indeed! 
What sort of books 

Does Wallace Reid? 

Gracious ! 

I'd happy be 

If I but knew 
The salary 
That Sidney Drew ! 

A Question 

Some say she's twenty-one-two-three, 
Or four-five-six ! My doubt behold ! 

I wish that you would tell to me 
Is Clara Kimball Young — or old? 

— Harold Seton. 



The fatigue uniform for civilians and service men 

pjaii iI#Ia <e! ct since 

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'The NIGHTweaf of a Nation ! " p5^' 




T WOULD MAKE 
A MONKEY LAUGH 

to find cocoanuts filled with 
ice cream. He could easily 
perform such a miracle were 
he a man and knew enough 
/^ to shake and freeze the 
vCJ/ cocoanuts with milk inside. 

What is the Difference 

Man laughs because he has a 
sense of humor. How did he get 
it? It grew from small practical 
jokes and ideas of the Stone Age 
to the more complex modern 
play of wits. Read Judge and n 
you will see the reason why. 

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The "Letters of a 
Self-Made Failure" 

ran serially for ten weeks in Leslie's and were 
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sit in "the driver's seat," or merely plod along 
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book full of hope, help and the right kind of 
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If you believe that it is more important to 
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one man succeeds, read this book. The Let- 
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touch of irresistible humor, and they impart 
a system of quaint philosophy that will appeal 
to everyone regardless of age, sex or station. 
Price $1.00. 

LESLIE-JUDGE COMPANY 

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A 32 page book on Ventriloquism 

sent with the VENTRILO for -fl ACt 

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A fascinating profession that pays big. Would you 
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Laugh and Live 

By Lieutenant Harold Hersey 

Inspired by copies of Douglas Fair- 
banks's new book, "Laugh and Live," 
for their camp library, members of the 
9th Coast Defense Command, stationed 
at Fort Hancock, instructed their histo- 
rian, Lieutenant Harold Hersey, to draft 
a resolution of appreciation. The lieu- 
tenant "fell for it" and expresses the 
sentiments of his camp in verse, thusly : 

TAKE a hand and have a heart — 
Laugh and Live ! 
Cut the grumbling; play your 
part — 
Laugh and Live ! 
Don't sit around and mumble; 

There's a world of things to do. 
It won't help you much to grumble; 
Find a way; it's up to you — 
Laugh and Live ! 

If you're in a rut, don't shirk — 

Laugh and Live ! 
Get a grip and do your work — 

Laugh and Live ! 
When you are down and out, 

Don't curse your luck and cry; 
Just take a turn about 
And have another try — ' 
Laugh and Live ! 

Take this recipe to bed — 

Laugh and Live ! 
Nail this one thought on the head — 

Laugh and Live ! 
Put a smile in every task; 

Help another fellow through. 
It's an easy thing to ask, 
An easy thing to do — 
Laugh and Live ! 

A smile will do the trick — 

Laugh and Live ! 
Have it handy when you're sick — 

Laugh and Live ! 
When you want to stop and worry, 

Pull your belt another inch. 
Get a move on in a hurry; 

When you know how, it's a cinch — 
Laugh and Live ! 



huh 



Film Fun 

Magazine of Fun, Judge's Library and 
Sis Hopkins' Own Book Combined. 

iiimiiiiiimiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiii 

No. 349— MAY, 1918 



mi iniiti i i iiiiiiiiiiilmti.ui/r.ii 



,ii minimi in l iiiiiumiiiinmiiiii ilium 



Single Copies, 10 Cents 
Subscription by the Year, $1.00 



'. i mniuiiimii 



Published monthly by 



LESLIE-JUDGE COMPANY, PUBLISHERS 
NEW YORK CITY. 

John A. Sleicher, President. 

Reuben P. Sleicher, Secretary. 
A. E. Rollauer, Treasurer. 

Grant Hamilton, Art Director. 
Jessie Niles Burness, Editor. 

.225 Fifth Avenue, New York. 



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Copyright, 1918, by Leslie-Judge Company, 
Publishers. 

Title registered as a trade-mark. 

Entered at the post-office at New YorL as 

second-class matter. 



Advertising Offices: 
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"The Curse of Drink" 

EVEN the most ex- 
emplary of men 
has some youthful 
| misdeed to look back 
upon. This amusing 
| picture may have been 
| you, back in the dim and 
| wicked past. 

| It has proved one of 

| Judge's most popular 

| subjects and has been re- 

| printed, in full colors, 

| mounted on a heavy mat, 

| 11 x 14, ready for the 

| frame. It will be mailed 

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Department 

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Or with the attached coupon 

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| Enclosed find $ for which 

| please send me . . -copies of "The 
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"WALL-NUTS" "GOOD-NIGHT, NURSE" 

By James Montgomery Flagg 




"ARE MY LIPS ON STRAIGHT?" 

By James Montgomery Flagg 




Here's a 

Suggestion 

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Five brilliant paint- 
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Mary Lane McMillan 
Paul Stahr 

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ane 






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inq the Shell Off <Dad 



D 



|OESN'T look as if he needed it, does 
he? But he did need it three 
inutes ago before the youngsters got him 
tow. Sat there in his armchair with 
cigar and paper and guessed he just didn't 
"want to see any pictures. 

But that's all changed now. Dad has 
found out that a Paramount or Artcraft feature 
is mighty well worth the effort of getting there, 
with its foremost stars, superb directing and 
clean treatment. 

Dad's was a bad case, too. 

Stubborn ! 

But, arrived at the theatre, he was quick to 

see the tremendous difference between what he 

remembered of motion pictures — it's quite a 




while since he went — and the Paramount 
and Artcraft photoplays of today. 

Somebody -seems to have got the right 
idea, he admitted cheerfully halfway through 
the performance, and the family soon let him 
know which somebody that was, and how Para- 
mount and Artcraft had come mighty near tak- 
ing all the guess-work out of motion pictures. 

Go to it, children of America and wives 
young and staying young! Take the shells off 
all the Dads ! 

The wiser they are the more they will enjoy 
— the foremost stars, 
— the superb directing, 
—the clean motion pictures 
— of Paramount ! of Aricraft ! 



tyaramount<^GHcra£t 

jHoiion (pictures Jk 



These are the trade-marks by which you may identify 
Paramount and Artcraft motion pictun 
and the theatres that show them. 

FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORPORATION I 

ADOLPH ZUKOR Pres. JESSE LLASKTC Vice Pres. CECIL 8. DE MULE DirectorCenergt ' 



\A 



FOREMOST STARS. SUPERBLY DIRECTED. IN CLEAN MOTION PICTURES'" 

J 



Mary Pickford Tells Some Startling Movie Truths 



t 



And The Magazine 
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Library and Sis Hopkins' 
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Price 10 Cents 

JUNE 



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Ten Famous 
Contributors 

Forty-Seven 
Illustrations 



COPYRIGHT, 1918, BY LESLIE-JUDGE CO., NEW YORK CITY 



GERALDINE FARRAR 



SPECIALLY POSED FOR FILM FUN AND 
DRAWN FROM LIFE BY LOU MAYER 



|iiuiiii]iiiiiimiii!iiiiiiiiiii!iii[iiiiiiiiiiii[iiiiii«ii in mi i ii n i iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 111 ii 111 mi iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ii urn iit.ii ii iiiiiiiiiiiniiiHiiiiii 111 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin niiin ;. u n mi m n iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiag 

THE HUN AT PLAY I 




The First and Only Adequately 
Illustrated American Edition 

IT is a remarkable fact that, without ex- 
ception, editions of Maupassant here- 
tofore accessible to the American reading 
public have contained illustrations not only 
crude in execution but, in their relation to 
the text, nothing less but grotesque cari- 
catures. 

This was a grave injustice to the author, 
as well as a reflection on the great body of 
American artists, which includes many of 
the world's most distinguished illustrators. 

The frontispiece illustrations for the 17 volumes 
of the Verdun Edition of Guy de Maupassant 
have been specially made by the talented Ameri- 
can artist J. E. Allen, and they will add iinmes- 
urably to the enjoyment of this Complete Collec- 
tion of the author's works by their graphic inter- 
pretation of the various characters and types 
found in his stories. 

A SPECIALLY LOW BEFORE-PUB- 
LICATION PRICE 

while the Verdun Edition is going through the 
press, will be named, confidentially, to those 
whose applications reach us in advance of publi- 
cation. Applicants for sets after that date will 
have to pav a higher price. To get the advantage 

Of this lOW price Sign and Mail Coupon To-Day. 

YOU ASSUME NO OBLIGATION 

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BRUNSWICK SUBSCRIPTION CO. F.F.6-]b | 

Brunswick Building, New York City, § 

Without obligation on my part, pleasesend full § 

particulars, with special before-publieation | 

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Complete Works of Guy de Maupassant, 17 i 

volumes, cloth. If quotations are satrsfactory e 

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me for delivery when published. Otherwise, | 

I waive all right to the special price quoted. | 

Name | 

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City... State § 

Occupation I 

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THE Bodies were bored. To be shut up for three months in a 
deserted chateau in the heart of Normandy was no small hard- 
ship for five Prussian officers accustomed to the gayeties of Ber- 
lin. To be sure, during their enforced stay, they had found entertain- 
ment in acts of vandalism, after the manner of their kind. Mutilated 
family portraits, priceless Flemish tapestries cut to ribbons, fine old 
mirrors cracked by pistol bullets, and the hacked and broken furni- 
ture that littered the spacious apartments of the chateau, all bore 
eloquent testimony to the favorite pastime of the Hun. But even 
this sport for the moment had palled. Outside the rain descended 
in torrents. As the brandy and liqueur passed from hand to hand, 
suddenly the Captain has an inspiration. A soldier is despatched 
to a nearby city. In the evening he returns with five handsome 
girls. How the table is laid and the fun grows fast and furious as 
the champagne flows ; how in an access of alcoholic patriotism toasts 
are proposed by the chivalrous Prussians reflecting on the bravery of 
the men and the virtue of the women of France; what happens to 
the Baron at the hands of one of the girls — a patriot even if ajllle 
dejoie — is told as only Maupassant could tell it in the story Mademoi- 
selle Fiji found in this superb Verdun Edition of 

The Complete Works of 
Guy de Maupassant 



Over 350 Novels, Stories, 

Poems 

(^UY de MAUPASSANT ob- 
^^ served life with a miraculous 
completeness and told what he saw 
with an intensity of feeling and with 
a precision which leaves the reader 
delighted and amazed. He was the 
most exact transcriber of life in liter- 
ature. His novels and stories, all of 
which will appear in the Verdun Edi- 
tion, leave the impression of the clear- 
est, frankest, most solid reality ; as if 
each phase of life in every stratum of 
society had been detached piece by 
piece, stripped of all conventional 
complexity, and so presented to the 
reader. His was the incomparable 
gift of understanding life, which is 
the heritage only of the greatest 
geniuses. 

In comparison with his novels and 
stories all others appear artificial and 
labored. Maupassant does not preach, 
argue, concern himself with morals, 
and has no social prejudices. He 
describes nothing that he has not seen 
and shows men and women just as he 
found them. His language is so 
simple and strong that it conveys the 
exact picture of the thing seen. His 
choice of subjects is always redeemed 
by an exquisite irony and art. 



The Best English Translation 
Complete— Literal— Unexpurgated 

WHILE the eyes of the whole world 
are centered on our gallant ally, 
France, and her heroic struggle against 
a ruthless invader; with the ghastly pic- 
ture before us of the brutal atrocities 
committed by an inhuman foe on her 
civilian population, her women and 
young girls; while the smoke still rises 
from her destroyed cities and profaned 
temples, and the crash and thunder of 
her guns is heard from Calais to the 
Vosges as she hurls defiance at her 
treacherous enemy — nothing could he 
more timely than the publication of this 
Complete Collection of the works of 
France's most gifted son, Guy de Mau- 
passant, in whom realism reached its 
culminating point and the short story 
the perfection of its art, and whose 
stories of the Franco-Prussian War, told 
with relentless realism, will be read now 
with a new interest and a fuller appreci- 
ation of their verity in the light of cur- 
rent events. But if such stories as Boule 
de Suif, Madame Sauvage, and Mademoi- 
selle Fiji first raised Maupassant to the 
highest pinnacle of literary fame, that 
position was rendered secure for all time 
by his other matchless series of novels 
and stories covering the widest range of 
human emotion and experience in vrhich 
every kind of character, good or bad, yielded ma- 
terial for his art. Literally translated, all these 
will appear in the Verdun Edition which will be 
published soon in a form unapproached by any 
previous edition ever offered on this side of the 
Atlantic. 

Illllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilfflllllllllliiilliiiniiiiililii 



MAY 10 1318 

©CLB413078 




BROWLRS PHOTO 



This picture demonstrates how Louise Glaum 's vampire wiles are perfected by careful study with an expert. 



Film Fun 

225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

An Independent Illustrated Monthly Magazine 
Devoted to the Best Interests of All 
Motion Picture Art and Artists 

JUNE-1918 



o 



n 



n 



s 



ILLUSTRATED FEATURES : 



The Real Future of the 

Films 
Personality on the Screen 
The Importance of Being 

Well-Dressed 
Should a Screen Artist 

Have a Mind ? 
Making the Heart Throb 

with the Camera 
Pictorial History of the 

Kiss 
The Cow-puncher as a 

Human Being 
Daintiness That Counts 
The Spirit of the Red 

Cross Cameraized 
Careers 
True Art in the Movies. 

(A prophecy by Ger- 

aldine Farrar) 
Why I Left My Mustache 

Behind 
When Wall Street Over- 
flowed 



Mary Pickford 
Pauline Frederick 

Edna Goodrich 

Olga Petrova 

George Beban 



Wallace Reid 
June Caprice 

James Montgomery Flagg 
Margarita Fischer 



Jessie Niles Burness 
Charlie Chaplin 
Douglas Fairbanks 



Hooverizing To Beat the 

(Waist) Band Fatty (Roscoe) Arbuckle 

COMMENTS OF A FREE LANCE : 

A Rare Achievement Linda A. Griffith 

Adequate Payment for 
Good Work 

Really a Star of the Silent 
Drama 

International Trade Re- 
lations and the Films 

The Gilt That Glitters 

Nobody Knows, but Here's 
a Good Guess 
EDITORIALS : 

A War-winning Wonder 

Unfair Play 
MISCELLANEOUS : 

Moving Picture Rhymes Harold Seton 

Those Comedy Pies 

Star Dust 
ART PORTRAITS : 

Mary Pickford, Louise Glaum, Pauline Frederick, Olm 

Thomas, Betty Blythe, Olga Petrova, George Beban, Wal 

lace Reid, Lillian Walker, fune Caprice, Grace Darmond 

Margarita Fischer and Geraldine Farrar. 



122 a year 



Number 350 



10c a 



copy 




PARAMOUNT-ARTi'.'KAFT 



an 

LITTLE MART*S** LATEST POETEAIT 



Mary Pickford is putting it all over the busy bee, these days— not honey, but money is what she gathers in. 

After completing "How Could You, Jean?" her June release, she spent three weeks campaigning for the 

Third Liberty Loan. The first subscription recorded was her own, for $100,000. 




PARAMOUNT -ARTCR 



"When the play, the acting, the star, the director and the presentation are mixed in the proper 
proportions, then only do we have the perfect picture." 

The Real Future of the Films 

Some New and Radical Ideas Voiced by the Most Popular Actress of the Screen 

By MARY PlCKFORD 



OUT HERE in California the press agents of the big 
film companies have each a rubber stamp. Every 
time a moving picture celebrity comes to town 
and an interview is in order, the publicity gen- 
tlemen get out their rubber stamps, dust them off and be- 
gin wielding them all over good white paper, to the glory 
of their calling and the exasperation of newspaper editors. 
They preface the words of the stamp by something like 
this: "Sel U. Lloyd, the moving picture magnate of the 
Wottawoppa Film Company, on arriving in Los Angeles 
yesterday, was interviewed by a reporter for the Morning 
Grape Fruit. His views on the picture industry are unique 
and carry the weight of prestige born of wisdom and years 
of experience. He said"- -and here's where the rubber 
stamp is called into service — " 'The moving picture indus- 
try is only in its infancy. Great things may be expected 
in the future. The surface has hardly been scratched. ' ' ' 

But, you know, the surface has been scratched, and we 
are now down to a stratum that offers interesting possibil- 
ities. It is the stratum of an entirely new art. Time was 
when pictures were just animated chases, shown for the 
effect on the eye. Then they took on the melodramatic 
form of hair-raising stories, crudely conceived and crudely 
produced. The beginning of art in the movies came when 
Adolph Zukor determined on something better than the 
wornout two-reelers and evolved the "feature picture," 
the play of five-reels, with famous stars of the speaking 
stage in the leading parts. It was a big jump from the old 
days and propelled the industry into new life. 

Now comes something neither akin to the stage nor 
akin to the novel, and yet not unrelated to both. It is a 
new art of the motion picture, and the beginning of its 
splendid possibilities is seen in such achievements as De 
Mille's "Old Wives for New" and VThe Blue Bird." 

Another fallacy is that a great many people still believe 
we must give the public what it wants. Now, the public 
has a large measure of influence in determining what the 
films shall be, but I do not believe it dictates to the pro- 



ducer what it wants. I do not believe it knows what it 
wants, and I say this in all humility and gratitude to a 
public that has been most kind to me. I would not think 
so much of the public if I thought it did know what it 
wanted, because I believe its mind is receptive to every 
new influence, to every added beauty, to every better 
achievement that we of the films can provide for it. And 
when we provide the right thing, the public's response is 
sure and hearty. 

The public does not know what it wants until it sees it. 
How should it? So from that fact we get our inspiration. 
We try over and over again until we have discovered what 
it is it really wants — a sort of ex post facto accessory after 
the fact, so to speak. 

Another thing I believe is that, after all, the play is not 
the thing. If it were, one could merely read a play and 
stay home from the movies. The beautiful presentation, 
the acting, the whole ensemble of the art of production 
would mean nothing. If the play were really the thing, 
the adequate acting, the fine interpretation, the human 
element of characterization and the ensemble would not be 
necessary. And yet we know they are necessary — very 
necessary. 

Neither the play, the acting, the star, the director nor 
the presentation is the thing alone. It is a proper combi- 
nation of all these that makes the picture of to-day and 
will make the picture of to-morrow. When we have them 
all mixed in the proper proportion, then, and then only, 
we know we have what the public wants. 

Of course, the war has brought about conditions that 
have disturbed the industry to a certain extent, but in gen- 
eral it will not bring about any important changes. For 
instance, many persons thought that, on account of the 
war tax on film, future photoplays would be made shorter. 
This was denied recently by Mr. Zukor, who said: "The 
war tax will not bring about any noticeable change in the 
length of the future photoplay. The five- or six-reel fea- 
ture could not be shown in three reels without impairing 



the story, any more than a three-act 
play could be presented in one. The 
five-reel picture has come to be an 
institution, just as has the three-act 

Play." 

So much for the length of the 
' ' photoplay of the future. ' ' The qual- 
ity, as I have already said, has been 
so steadily progressing in every re- 
spect that I do not doubt it will con- 
tinue to do so. Already in several 
instances the legitimate stage has bor- 
rowed its material from the screen, or 
at least dramatized a picture-story 
after it has been presented on the 
screen, as in "Seventeen," Booth 
Tarkington's popular American boy 
story, in which my brother appeared 
on the screen about a year before 
the stage version. There was also 
' ' Tiger Rose, ' ' which appeared on the 
screen as "Nanette of the Wilds" 
before its stage adaptation. 

Some time in the future it may 
be that all conversation, action or 
lapse of time will be conveyed in the 
picture itself — that titles and sub- 
titles will be necessary only as inci- 
dentals. This will not be, however, 
until photoplay writing has come to 
be not so much a branch of literature 
as a new art of its own. 

The photoplay of the future ! What 
glorious possibilities are wrapped up 
in those words ! What chance for in- 
finite good, for heart-warming senti- 
ment, for inspiration of the true value 
of beauty! 

It will not be found in gorgeous 
settings, in stupendous effects, in 
huge ensemble scenes, in the wornout 
term "punch" which the dramatic 
critics use so freely. Rather it will 
come from a new vision of a new 
art — a vision that even now is 
opening out before our eyes and show- 
ing us a truer meaning for the land 
of the pictured play — that land that 
takes us away from the humdrum or 
the turmoil of life, whichever it may 
be, and gives to us a little surcease 
from care, puts a little more love 
in our hearts, makes us better citizens, 
better men and women, yes, and 
better Americans. 





PARAMOUNT-ABTCRAFT 



'Amarilly of Clothesline Alley" practices 
"the smile worth while." 



Moving Picture Nursery 
Rhymes 

(For Mary Pickford) 

Mary, Mary, 

Light and airy, 
How do your pictures go? 

Smiles and tears, 

Applause and cheers, 
Wherever they may show ! 

{For Douglas Fairbanks) 
There was a man in our town, 

And he was wondrous wise; 
He jumped into the movie game 

And beat the other guys ! 

(For Charlie Chaplin) 
There was an old woman, 

Who lived in a shoe; 
'Twas larger than Charlie's — 

A nice dow-de-do ! 

(For Roscoe Arbuckle) 
Little Jack Horner 
Sat in the corner, 
Eating a Christmas pie. 
Said Fatty, "Why eat? 
It is truly more meet 
To hurl it in somebody's eye!" 
— Harold Seton. 

Those Comedy Pies 

Too many cooks spoil the pie. 

One good pie deserves another. 

Where there's a pie, there's a play. 

Never look a gift pie in the crust. 

Custard pie makes cowards of us 
all. 

Never cross a pie until you come 
to it. 

To apple is human; to mince, 
divine. 

The pie is mightier than the 
sword. 

'Tis pie that makes the film go 
round. 

A pie in the hand is worth two in 
the face. 

Pie springs eternal in the human 
breast. 

Pies will happen in the best regu- 
lated farces. 

Never count your pies before 
they're baked. 

A pie by any other name would 
cause a laugh. 

There are as good pies in the 
property-room as ever were caught. 
— Harold Seton. 

Star Dust 

Ella — They kept showing "close- 
ups" of her eyes and lips. 

Bella— Well, she was being "fea- 
tured" in that production! 




Linda A. Griffith 

Comments and Criticisms of a Free-Lance 

By Linda A. Griffith 

(Mrs. David W. Griffith) 

(Editor's Note: The writer, who began her career with the Biograph Company, is well known in the moving 

picture world. Her latest success was as star in her own striking sociological play "Charity." She is a 

keen critic and analyst of all that pertains to motion picture art, and tells the truth about those who 

are either striving for its downfall or working for its advancement. ) 



A Rare Achievement 

AN "EDGAR LEWIS" picture gives hope for the 
future of the movies. Here is one producer who 
L does not insult the intelligence of the spectator. 
He evidently thinks that normal adults go to the 
movies once in a while, and that an audience is not com- 
posed entirely of children, or those who are too tired to 
think, those who don't think, or those who cannot think. 
It is indeed refreshing to see, once in a blue moon, a photo- 
play with an idea. In an "Edgar Lewis" picture the idea 
is always predominant. One is not annoyed by a star's 
intrusive personality, and so it is possible to forget the 
complementary almighty dollar. This is a pleasant relaxa- 
tion in a day when the star's salary is so much more in 
evidence than her ability. "The Sign Invisible," with 
that sterling actor, Mitchell Lewis, and a splendid acting 
cast throughout, is the type of photoplay that is altogether 
too seldom seen these days. It is moral, it is logical, and, 
without preaching, it tells that most beautiful story that 
"sight" is not a matter of "optics," but of "faith." It 
recalled to my mind a simple little verse I had learned as 
a child in Sunday school : 

"And we shall see bow all God's plans are right, 
And how what seemed reproof was love most true. ' ' 

And this, mind you, told in true movie style, with a 
villain, a hero and a heroine. The settings were the big 
outdoors, rough cabins and homely interiors — one of those 



rare pictures in which the heroine did not have a brocaded 
chaise longue in her boudoir. 

Adequate Payment for Good Work 

David Wark Griffith rises to say that Mary Pickford, 
receiving a reputed salary of $20,000 weekly, is greatly 
underpaid. He compares her salary with the amount of 
money John D. Rockefeller is said to receive annually from 
the American public — $50,000,000. Mr. Griffith also says, 
quoting a great writer, that "sincerity is the basis of all 
great things." Then, continues Mr. Griffith: "Mary Pick- 
ford has endeared herself to many persons, particularly 
children, throughout the world through her ability to bring 
sunshine, love and laughter into their lives. This is at a 
minimum cost of time and money within reach of all. It 
is her sincerity that is the answer. If the income of the 
oil magnate is based on merit, then Mary Pickford's sal- 
ary, compared to what it should be, is like measuring a 
ray of light with the sun or comparing a drop of water 
with the ocean." 

In the first place, Mary Pickford couldn't even produce 
her pictures — at least, she could only do one where she now 
does twelve, and hardly that, did she not depend upon John 
D. Rockefeller's gasoline to make the autos go that carry 
movie actors all over the country to get the necessary scenic 
effects for her movies. Her pictures wouldn't be shown, 
they couldn't be shown "at a minimum cost within the 
reach of all," if John D. didn't conveniently furnish gaso- 







The Marionettes" is one of Clara 
Kimball Young's most 
striking successes. 

line at from twenty to thirty cents a 
gallon. If Mary Pickford had to de- 
pend upon a horse and buggy in the 
production of her pictures, the time it 
would take to produce a picture would 
make the salaries of the actors so enor- 
mous that a ticket to a movie show 
would cost more than one to grand 
opera. Mary Pickford is a charming 
little lady, and for the joyous hours 
she has brought to many lives she 
deserves all the money she can get. 
It is a wonderful, wonderful thing 
to bring laughter and smiles into this 
sad old world. As far as sincerity 
goes, however, I think there is as 
much truth and sincerity in John D. 
Rockefeller's gasoline as in Mary 
Pickford's movies. John D. 's gaso- 
line has never failed to make a motor 
car go if the works are 
in shape. The issue of ~~~~ r, """ 
this great war may depend r| 
upon gasoline. Stop and 
try to realize what the air 
and land machines run 
by it are doing. I think 
John D. is entitled to his 
fifty million with as clean 
a conscience for sincerity 
as Mary Pickford is en- 
titled to her $20,000 
weekly for making folks 
happy. 

Really Star of the 
Silent Drama 

John Barrymore, who select 

has been jumping in and This scene 
out of the movies for On the left 




(Center panel) Winsome June Caprice, 
who has just completed ' 'A 
Camouflaged Kiss. ' ' 

some years past, is now presented to 
the public by L. Lawrence Weber in 
"Raffles." John Barrymore has, by 
his splendid work on the dramatic 
stage in both comedy and tragedy, 
risen to stardom and is much loved 
and greatly respected as an artist by 
the theater-going people of America. 
Some day a movie managerwill realize 
that John Barrymore can mean as 
much to the photoplay audience as he 
does to the crowds of drama lovers 
that flock to the theater to see him in 
everything he does. "Raffles" affords 
Mr. Barrymore no opportunity to show 
what his capabilities as a movie actor 
might be. It is an inferior picture, 
the story is badly told, deviating too 
far from the clever original by E. W. 
Hornung. There is a place for John 
Barrymore in the movies. 
He photographs very well 
indeed. He has "screen" 
personality. He always 
looks and conducts him- 
self as a gentleman 
should. There is no movie 
star of his type. Let us 
hope that some day the 
public may be fortunate 
enough to see John Barry- 
more in a photoplay 
worthy of his talents. 

International Trade 

Relations and 

the Films 



from "The Marionettes" is really a family party, 
is Miss Young's mother, and on the right, her aunt. 



The London News urges 
the development in Eng- 
land of the commercial 



picture. This paper argues that the United States and Ger 
many are going to use the motion picture for the 
development of their overseas trade, and 
therefore Britain should get in line. 
Even commercial picture theaters are 
advocated, in which the drummer 
can see and learn from these com- 
mercial films all there is to be i 
learned about his trade. Much /.-, 
valuable information can be dis- 
seminated in this manner, but I 
would hardly go so far as to say 
that the time will come when a 
commercial traveler will rent a 
picture theater and show on the 
screen before expectant buyers the 
films taken of the goods he has to sell 
If color photography 
ever becomes practic- 
able, that would be a 
big step thereto. Buy- 
ers would at least want 
to see the colors of the 
materials o r articles 
they might want to pur- 
chase. Even with 
color, a conservative 
buyer would not be sat- 
isfied to buy bolts of 
silk or wool or piles of 
hides without fingering 
the actuality and get- 
ting the "feel" of 
things. There are 
many new and wonder- 
ful things for the mo- 
tion picture yet to 
achieve, but the day 
when a "drummer, in- 
stead of carrying sam- 
ples about with him, 
will carry reels showing 
the goods he wishes to 
sell, rent a local theater 
at each town he visits, 
and there run off the 
film before prospective 
customers" is a long 
way off, and I doubt if 
it ever will be realized. 

A Stage Success Be- 
comes a Screen 
Triumph 

Clara Kimball 
Young, in "The Mari- 
onettes," is very beau- 
tiful to look upon. Not 
only does she satisfy 
the eye as to beauty, 
but she contributes 




FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS 



'The Sign Invisible," in which stellar roles are played by Mabel 
Julienne Scott and Mitchell Lewis, has an out-door setting 
that contributes to development of the unusual plot. 



some of the best work of her long motion picture career 
in "The Marionettes." I liked her better in 
this photoplay than in any story she has 
been seen in since she made her first big 
hit in Vitagraph's ' ' My Official Wife. ' ' 
Miss Young shows great subtlety in 
her characterizations of the timid 
convent girl, the gray mouse of 
a wife, and the later radiant 
Parisienne. The direction of 
Emille Chautard was all that 
could be desired. In fact, the 
success of this picture lay entirely 
in the direction, as the plot is as 
old as the hills. This shows what 
"treatment" can do. A hundred 
poets have written about the sunset, a 
thousand canvases re- 
cord sunsets, and there 
have been a hundred 
motion pictures whose 
central plot was that of 
"The Marionettes, " but 
not one that was better 
told. Delicacy and con- 
vincing detail in the di- 
rection, Miss Young's 
clever transitions, the 
beautiful settings, and 
the fine work of Nigel 
Barrie, who supports 
Miss Young, contribute 
to make "The Marion- 
ettes" a most enjoyable 
photoplay. A word 
should be said for the 
very clever handling of 
the little Marionette 
theater and the crisp, 
amusing verse contrib- 
uted by Anita Loos. 

The Gilt That Glit- 
ters Doesn't Meet 
All Needs 

It has often been 
stated that there is "no 
royal road to acting." 
Imagine the indignation 
that would greet one by 
making the statement 
that there was a royal 
road to acting to such 
dramatic stars as Mar- 
garet Anglin, Marjorie 
Rambeau or little Fay 
Bainter, who recently 
made such a tremendous 
success in "The Willow 
Tree. " What a dreadful 

^Continued in advertising 
section) 




PARAMOUNT 



I. FRED ("HENF.Y JOHNSTON PHOTO 



The rides filled by Pauline Frederick in screen plays cover an infinite variety of types. The poiseful lady here 
protrayed possesses to an unusual degree the ability to forget herself and be the characters she assumes. 




In "The Love That Lives" Pauline Frederick portrays the self-sacrificing devotion of a mother of the poor. 

Personality on the Screen 

Some of the Difficulties of Simulating Emotional Roles 

By PAULINE FREDERICK 



EVERYBODY likes to step out of .his everyday role 
of business man, homekeeper or professional 
worker, I am told, and everyone cherishes the se- 
cret conviction that he or she is in reality a second 
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — a person of dual or triple per- 
sonality. The ability to drop the prosaic things of the 
workaday world and become, for a time, another quite dif- 
ferent person is one of the happiest adventures of human 
life. 

In this respect we player folk have the advantage over 
most people. We can at will throw ourselves into a role 
and become quite a different person. This is why many of 
us prefer happy roles to the more dramatic or sad ones, for 
in the latter case it tires one out to play them quite as 
much as if they were real. Personally, however, I find the 
more complicated roles far more interesting. True, they 
are difficult to a degree for the player, but to the watcher 
of the finished product, on stage or screen, the character 
transformation, the wide sweep of emotions, brings lasting 
pleasure. 

One of the characters which I most enjoyed playing was 
that of Molly McGill, a scrubwoman in the picture by Scud- 
der Middleton, "The Love That Lives." Molly, whose life 
had been a depressing, sordid affair, had a heart still un- 
touched with bitterness and resolved that her children 
should escape the suffering that had been her lot. With 
this in view, she accomplished some heroic sacrifices, end- 
ing with actually giving her life for the sake of the girl 
her son loved. The role was not over-melodramatic. It 
was the simple story of a woman of the slums, not in the 
least more tragic than many of the lives of the poor women 
who earn their living on bended knees, mopping office 
floors in the still hours of the night. 

Occasionally the transition from one personality to an- 



other is supremely difficult for the player. Then he brings 
to his aid the greatest of all wizards — music. There are 
a few directors who can arouse a great emotion without 
this by retelling the sad portion of the story, or even by 
frightening the star to tears. This is not often done now, 
music being the official, as it were, tear starter. 

It happened that the very day when the big scenes for 
"Resurrection" were to be taken, I had received some par- 
ticularly good news from a friend who had been ill. I 
was wearing what I must admit to be an especially stun- 
ning new hat, and my spirits were correspondingly high. 
How to get down to the cold zero of Katusha's Siberian 
misery was the question ! Charles Whittaker, who made 
the scenario and who is an expert on things Russian, tried 
to get me into the mood with his saddest tales of Russian 
misery. It all seemed unreal and far away, somehow; all 
I could think of was the good tidings I had received, and I 
remember wondering secretly, while he was waxing more 
and more eloquent, whether or not to wear the new hat for 
a tea the next afternoon. 

Seeing that the required mood was not forthcoming, a 
stringed quartet was summoned, and Tosti's "Goodbye," 
Massenet's "Elegie," and finally, as a last resort, Irving 
Berlin's "When I Lost You" were played. At last the 
effect was secured, and I was able to do justice to the 
scene. It is not often that I experience such difficulty, 
however, for, being blessed — or cursed, perhaps — with a 
vivid imagination, I find it easy to place myself in the 
position of the person I am trying to portray, to feel the 
same emotions. 




— 




POSED EXCLUSIVELY FOR FILM FUN VICTOB GEORG PHOTO 



For Olive Thomas this season of 1917-1918 has been an eventful one. Her first trip to the Great West to 

film "Broadway Jones," was followed by her marriage in Los Angeles to Jack Pickford, who has 

now enlisted in the aviation service. ' ' Heiress for a Day ' ' is her current release. 




mm 

MUTUAL 



Edna Goodrich knows whereof she speaks : her "creations" are inspired and inspiring. 



The Importance of Being Weil-Dressed 

Some Reasons Why Correct Costuming is an Aid to Art 

By Edna Goodrich 



IT IS, I think, not too much to say that clothes are 
nearly as important an element in dramatic inter- 
pretation as ability to act. Speaking for myself, I 
find it impossible to enter properly into the spirit of 
characterization unless I am correctly costumed to the very 
last detail. 

Makeshifts of any sort in connection with a dramatic 
production make me miserable. I have been accused of 
over-emphasizing the importance of clothes in stagecraft, 
but no one has ever said anything that convinces me I am 
wrong in my view of the matter, which is that I am likely 
to look very much as I feel. If I don't feel right, I'm cer- 
tain not to look right, and to feel right I find it necessary 
to be correctly attired from the skin out. 

Since this is to be, as I understand it, an intimate tale 
of my so-called idiosyncrasy for expensive clothes, I'll 
confess that I spent last year over $5,000 for lingerie to 
use in my star roles, and I don't play "lingerie parts," so, 
of course, no one but myself gets anything out of the in- 
vestment, except abstractly, since the wearing of pretty 
things appropriate to the time, place and situation makes 
me feel sure of myself, able to face the camera with confi- 
dence and a fair degree of success. 

Of course, this is purely psychological, but, then, so is 
the art of acting. Certafii kinds of lingerie are adapted 



especially to certain kinds of gowns, and in order to feel 
at peace with myself and the director, I want the kind that 
belongs to the gowns. When I am attired for the ballroom, 
(to particularize), I insist upon being clad throughout as 
though I were really going to a ball. If the action of the 
piece calls for Alpine climbing or horseback riding, I dress 
those situations with the same punctilious regard to detail. 

I remember that while I was in London, newspaper 
critics were poking fun at the late Sir Henry Irving, be- 
cause, as it was said, he changed his bill at the Lyceum 
on an hour's notice on learning that certain starched ruffles 
he wore in "The Corsican Brothers" had not come from 
the laundry. This was regarded as the last word in tem- 
peramentalism, but I can very well comprehend how Sir 
Henry felt. He would have felt his characterization in- 
complete without the ruffles. 

Nothing is more fatal to success in pictorial drama than 
slovenly or makeshift costuming. The idea some folks 
have that nearly anything will look fairly well in a motion 
picture has been responsible for some sad failures. My 
experience convinces me that the best of costuming is es- 
sential to satisfactory pictorial presentment. I spend more 
money in dressing for my picture plays than I do in dress- 
ing speaking stage parts. 

(Continued in advertising section) 




EDITORIAL 

A War-winning Wonder 

MOTION pictures have become really a tribune of 
the people in these war times. They are of 
incalculable benefit and comfort to all of us. 
This has become such a well-established fact 
that we no longer marvel over it. Even the really mar- 
velous has ceased to thrill us. 

The new war film of D. W. Griffith's will haunt the 
beholder for a long while and make him a better American 
"forever and ever." With consummate artistry a fine, 
clean, simple love story is woven into the fabric of war so 
exquisitely that the effect on the beholder is like that of a 
Gobelin tapestry in which every thread contributes to 
perfection. 

Every known means of death in use in this terrible war 
tragedy is shown— the great guns in action, with their slow 
recoil, trench mortars, great and small rapid-fire guns and 
small arms, and always, by contrast, the gallant spirit that 
animates each individual of the seemingly inexhaustible 
hordes of marching men. 

Slow-sailing observation dirigibles are seen, and occa- 
sionally a flight of the swift battle planes. A few night 
scenes show maneuvers of the air forces, with the flight of 
star shells searching out the enemy. Every beholder of 
this great picture — and the "Standing Room Only" sign is 
needed at every performance — is compelled to feel a new 
devotion to his country's cause. On those of us who have 
been doggedly doing our bit as a matter of duty, it acts 
like stirring martial music. It makes us move with an 
enthusiasm that, _when it becomes general, will be irre- 
sistible. 



W 



VITAGRAPH 



ALFRED CHENEY JonNSTON PHOTO 



Betty Blythe, who did fine work with Sergeant Arthur 

Guy Empey and Lois Meredith, in 

"Over the Top." 



Unfair Play 

HEN three of the screen's brightest stars rose 

up from their lotus life of ease in the coast 

studios, where personally they hardly ever 

work more than twenty hours a day, and came 

East to engage in the really arduous labor of a Liberty Loan 

campaign, they deserved praise and co-operation. 

Instead of that, troubles swarmed over them like a plague 
of locusts the first week of their pilgrimage, various suits, 
aggregating enormous amounts — in one case a half-million 
dollars — having been brought against them. We would not 
usurp the privilege of a judge; the claims may all be just, 
but we submit that if they are just, they can be established, 
at the right time and in the usual way, without all this 
notoriety. 

Bringing them at this time would seem to have been 
done with the deliberate intent to hinder and cripple a 
stupendous and magnificent undertaking that appeals to 
every red-blooded American. 

The third Liberty Loan was over-subscribed in record 
time, and cheerfully. In the same way the fourth, and as 
many more as may be needed, will be cared for. America 
keeps her covenants. But every enthusiast who can arouse 
the laggards is needed, and deserves all honor and co- 
operation. These obstructienists may comfort themselves 
with the consciousness of having hindered all they could. 





J 



PETEOYA PICTURES 



MARCEAXJ PHOTO 



"There are two kinds of movie artists — those who think and those who do not think/' 



Should a Screen Artist Have a Mind? 

A Vital Query Raised by An Artist of the First Rank 

By OLGA PETROVA 



SOME time ago I remember reading a criticism in a 
Philadelphia newspaper, which, in speaking of an 
artist more or less well known in the realm of photo- 
drama, made the following comment: "Miss Blank 
evidently believes that movie audiences are mind readers 
and acts her parts accordingly. ' ' 

I have wondered ever since if the aforesaid Miss Blank 
really deserved the enormous, though quite unpremeditated, 
praise that this literary genius from Philadelphia had ac- 
corded her; for to what greater tribute could the soul of 
an artist aspire than that she should play to the minds of 
the public, not merely to the eyes of that hocus-pocus con- 
glomeration of humanity that helps to build up the patron- 
age of the cinema? And to what greater eminence shall 
that same audience lift up its voice in incoherent worship 
than to such a phenomenon as the mind of an artist — not 
to mention the mere fact of the presupposed recognition of 
a mind of its own? 

In simple language, then, and unashamed, let us say 
that as there are at least two kinds of artists, so are there 
two kinds of audiences which follow as a sine qua non and 
the natural order of things. These two kinds of artists 
resolve themselves into those who think and those who do 
not think. In other words, one actress, in requesting the 
gentleman who insists upon forcing his attentions, plus his 
diamonds, upon her shrinking self at two o'clock in the 
morning, points her delicately manicured forefinger — or 
not, as the case may be — toward that part of the scenery 
communicating directly with yreat truth W7itf£M 00 r, de- 
manding that he go immed misled when ^LOIS does 



ner, her subconscious thought, the expression of her eyes 
give the same elderly roue (naturally they must be elderly 
to be roues) precisely the same stimulus for exit. 

There is no doubt, of course, generally speaking, that 
the eye of the moving picture audience has been trained at 
the expense of its mind, and with the artist lies the re- 
sponsibility for this state of affairs. I mean that the eye 
has been accustomed after long schooling to appreciate 
broad and physical action — action, detestable word ! — rather 
than to observation of such fine, tiny things as a mind, a 
soul, looking out of the window of a human face. 

The great, the illimitable future of the moving picture 
must resolve itself into artistry, first, last and always. At 
present we are struggling vainly to express that art, which 
is pointed sometimes in the right direction, but more often 
in the opposite. We are only beginning to realize what a 
stupendous giant we have nursed in the smug belief that 
we held a petulant or amusing infant in our metaphorical 
arms. At present we have few standards upon which to 
base our future efforts. If one artist raves impotently to 
express an emotion with wild windmilling of arms and 
superhuman contortions of the facial muscles, while an- 
other relies upon a stony and impassive calm, how shall 
we tell, we seekers after truth, which is the altar upon 
which to lay our oblations? 

Where is the prophet who shall lead us? Where is our 
Bernhardt of the screen? 



not point the delicately : 



2145 Berkeley"" 





tit! ZsSimv.. . 



HOOVER ART CO. PHOTO 



George Beban believes he's developing a coming star of first ma.on. These obstructiev who appears with his 

father in many plays. His belief 'finals expression in the ; n the consciousness of hav.'<^> at Hollywood, 

Cal. , where he will direct plays such as he refe - " V a 9 e - 



IB 



IBM 



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T|he1 




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rives later 
magnificent 
wounded and 
experiences —a 
attention to 
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white uniforn 
on the ground 
half conscious 
him just as a 
the wounded. 
Ethel finds he 
back to health 

Notwithstai} 
ture is issued 
the big drive sj 
tiful production 1 
will please the 
er while appealing f 
his patriotism, 
"The Spirit of 
Red Cross" animates 
it throughout. A deli- 
cately shaded pathos 
that will make every 
heartstring vibrate is 
the keynote. The bat- 
tle scenes are stirring 
and present truly the 



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Sammy learns the great truth 

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ick in the dark 

beautiful es- 

women, and 

m ever since. 

len in it) has 

iated notions. 

lot any worse 

they have at- 

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knter«;t in life 

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it won't make a 
or not I could darn 
P bunches in it, or broil 
e. But it may make a 
been able to furnish 
tion for the entire family 
a week, 
friendship, and lots of it, 
happy until I have made 
Veryone with whom I come in 
because it is a part of my ca- 
fccause it is my disposition, 
ve the next generation of women 
more interesting in every way, be- 
the stimulus given to their lives by 
tion pictures. I notice so much dif- 
:e in the women I meet since the pic- 
have become popular. The entire 
rid has been visualized for thera; it has 
een like a universal education. Not merely 
for the women who have lacked advantages, 
mind you, but more especially for the type 
of women whose outlook has been limited by 
their intellectual concepts — who could not 
be made to believe that there was anything 
worth while outside of their special circle 
of culture. 

The photoplay has done as much to en- 
large woman's sphere as any other individ- 
ual educational factor. 



BBS En 



Get More Out of Life! 



Intensify your thinking power; intensify your 
learning power; intensify your memory power; 
intensify your concentrating power; intensify 
your sensing power; intensify your reasoning 
power; intensify your planning power; inten- 
sify your mental power; intensify your per- 
sonal power; multiply your every power. Be 
more. Get more out of life. Make yourself 
worth more to yourself and to your future. 



Conscious Evolution 

harnesses the real power of 
personality, the real power of 
evolution, the real power of 
life, the real power of learning, 
the real power of memorizing, 
the real power of advancement. 

Become a bigger man 

personally, mentally, thinking- 
ly, reasoningly. Be more suc- 
cessful. Why 
be satisfied 
with less than 
your full 
share of the 
rewards of 
life? Why 
live the infe- 
r i o r life? 
Why be less 
of a success? 
Why take less 
than your full 
share of pleas- 
u r e of 1 i f e ? 
Why not con- 
tinue ascend- 
ing in the 
scale of life ? 




Effective 
for 

Women 
as for 
Men 



Conscious Evolution cTnf^Vd 

with Medical Practice, or with any purely 
Mental Science, Speculative Science, Psychol- 
ogy, Christian Science, Theosophy, Hindoo Phi- 
losophies, Self-hypnosis, New Thought, or any 
other conceptually symbolic systems of the sec- 
ondary and tertiary type, complexed by ill- 
equation. Conscious Evolution is a real science 
— a science of reality, a demonstrable science, 
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True Art in the Movies 

Possibilities That Geraldine Parrar Sees 
in Films 



T 



PARAMOUNT 



VICTOR GEORQ PHOTO 

Geraldine Farrar has sung "La Tosca" to thou- 
sands. Her screen presentation of Car- 
men" has reached hundreds of 
thousands. 



By Jessie Niles Burness 

HE POPULARITY of film plays waning? No, 
decidedly; I think they are now a necessary 
part of life to the people — all the people — and 
will become even more an essential part of our 
everyday doings as the making of pictures is perfected. I 
know of no other art (and you know that for years I have 
sung in grand opera) which appeals so directly to the heart. 
' What the eyes have seen, ' you know, is retained longer in 
the mind than those impressions which the ear registers. ' ' 

The speaker was Geraldine Farrar. Our request that 
she confirm the rumor regarding a new contract led to an 
interview likely to be of interest to her Film Fun friends. 

Miss Farrar is in all things an enthusiast. She doesn't 
believe in half portions. Anything that is worth her doing 
at all receives her whole-hearted devotion. 

"I cannot give you details now about the new contract. 
I have not yet finished my Metropolitan opera season in 
New York. After that comes a month of traveling, singing 
in opera, in concert and in several benefits, and, oh! I 
hope you will tell all our friends about those benefit per- 
formances, for at every one of them I shall give, with all 
my heart, the very best of my art for the cause of freedom. ' ' 

(How well she kept that covenant is matter of happy 
memory to the hosts who heard her sing in front of the 
Public Library for the Liberty Loan, and at the benefit per- 
formance she arranged May 5th for the State Women's 
War Relief "for our boys, those that are here and those that 
are Over There. ' ' ) 

"What screen play of mine do I like best? 'Joan the 
Woman.' That was a really great play. It deserves to 
live. I believe it will live a long time. Other plays have 
not suited me so well. ' The Woman God Forgot' was spec- 
tacular and true as to details, but to be convincing it would 
have needed historical accuracy, which it lacked. Direct- 
ors, most of them, haven't yet come to realize that the ring 
of truth must prevail throughout every play that is to win 
hearty and lasting popularity. A lack of that realization 
accounts for the difference in directors. It explains why 
D. W. Griffith is a genius, while the others are only crafts- 
men — capable, I grant you, able, earnest and sincere, but 
nevertheless craftsmen only. 

"I do not wish to seem critical. The very best of us in 
photoplays is only a beginner. Everyone who is sincere 
and willing to work can contribute something to the mak- 
ing of better pictures. Real progress is being made. Good 
work is sure to win recognition. 

" The new pictures, I am happy to tell you, are to be 
made in California, where one can work the best, in the open- 
air studios of sunshine land. There I am never tired, even 
after a long day. We leave for the coast in June. Just as 
soon as it can be done in fairness to everybody concerned, 
I shall give you the details of my new work. You shall 
have them the very first one." 




KEEPING tk FAMILY TOGETHER 




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That's only cupboard love 

No, the real cementing influence, as 
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Son will chip in on the party as well 
as Daughter and the youngsters, when it 
comes to seeing with the old folks the first- 
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Artcraft. 



And there's no pretence about it either 
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The fascination of the foremost stars, — 
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The fascination of superb directing, — 
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The fascination of clean motion p.ctures, 
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"The Curse of Drink" 

EVEN the most ex- 
emplary of men 
has some youthful 
misdeed to look back 
upon. This amusing 
picture may have been 
you, back in the dim and 
wicked past. 

It has proved one of 
Judge's most popular 
subjects and has been re- 
printed, in full colors, 
mounted on a heavy mat, 
11 x 14, ready for the 
frame. It will be mailed 
post free for twenty-five 
cents, stamps. 

Judge Art Print 
Department 

225 Fifth Ave. New York City 

Or with the attached coupon 

Judge Art Print Dept. 

225 Fifth Ave. New York City 

Enclosed find $ for which 

please send me ■••■copies of "The 
Curse of Drink," as advertised. 



Name 

Ad d ress 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiniiii iiiiiiiiiiiiii 



The Importance of Being 
Well-Dressed 

{.Continued from a previous page) 

For instance, the new clothes I wore 
in "Who Loved Him Best?" cost a trifle 
over $10,000. There was an outing 
costume — epitomizing simplicity in 
line — which cost $ 1, 500. I wore a full 
d-ess gown — a Parisian creation with a 
good deal of expensive lace — which 
cost $3,000. The other items were rid- 
ing costumes, boating costumes, golf- 
ing togs, hats, boots, shoes, parasols, 
gloves, furs and cloaks. 

Novelty in dressing, so long as it 
violates none of the dramatic unities, 
is desirable. As an example, I wore a 
set of furs in one of my latest pictures 
that defied identification even by expert 
furriers and for that reason caused 
much comment. Those furs were pro- 
cured for me by a friend in the United 
States Engineering Corps ; he has been 
for some time engaged in taking the 
kinks out of the Trans Siberian railway 
between Irkutsk and Lake Baikal. The 
furs are Russian otter and cost $2,000. 
My beaded gown in the ballroom scene 
of "American Maid" cost $1,800. An- 
other gown worn in the same play cost 
$1,000. 

Aside from the professional utility 
of beautiful and expensive clothes, I 
must confess I love them for purely 
feminine reasons. I am never more 
happy than when wearing, for the first 



Film Fun 

Magazine of Fun, Judge's Library and 
Sis Hopkins 1 Own Book Combined. 



iiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiimnmiiiiiiiiiii 



IIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIII 



No. 350— JUNE, 1913 

Single Copies, 10 Cents 
Subscription by the Year, $1.00 

iiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiimiiiimiiiitiiiiimiiiitimiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiuiiiiiuiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Published monthly by 

LESLIE-JUDGE COMPANY, PUBLISHERS 

NEW YORK CITY. 
John A. Sleicher. President. 

Reuben P. Sleicher, Secretary. 
A. E. Rollauer, Treasurer. 

Grant Hamilton. Art Director. 
Jessie Niles Burness, Editor. 
225 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

Copyright, 1918, by Leslie-Judge Company, 
Publishers. 

Title registered as a trademark. 

Entered at the post-office at New York as 
second-class matter. 



Advertising Offices: 
225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 
Marquette Building, Chicago, 111. 
Walker Building, Boston, Mass. 
Henry Building, Seattle, Wash. 



time, a new costume that has turned 
out as I hoped it would. Call it a hobby 
if you will, but I'll confess also to sav- 
ing all my prettiest gowns worn in dra- 
matic characterizations. I've a room 
full of them, dating from my earliest 
stage appearances, and they are all tick- 
eted. This room devoted to gowns is 
referred to by my intimate friends as 
"Edna's museum." 

Clothes do not make the artist, per- 
haps, but they go a long way toward es- 
tablishing that self-confident mental 
poise which is essential to the best 
artistic results. In short, I'm a pre- 
Raphaelite for detail in dramatic dress- 
ing. I like it, and — it pays. 



yiyhJJ/y^tJLAj^M 



LEGAL NOTICE. 



FILM FUN is printed by The Williams Printing 
Company. 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGE- 
ment, etc., required by Act of Congress of August 
24th, 1912. Film Fun and the Magazine of Fun: 
Judge's Library & Sis Hopkins' Own Book Com- 
bined, published monthly at New York, N. Y., for 
April 1st, 1918. 

State of New York f 
County of New York \ 

Before me, a Notary Public in and for the State 
and county aforesaid, personally appeared Reuben 
P Sleicher, who, having been duly sworn accord- 
ing to law, deposes and says that he is the Business 
Manager of Film Fun and the Magazine of Fun: 
Judge's Library and Sis Hopkins' Own Book Com- 
bined and that the following is, to the best of his 
knowledge and belief, a true^statement of the own- 
ership, management, etc., of the aforesaid publica- 
tion for the date shown in the above caption, re- 
quired by the Act of August 24th, 1912, embodied in 
section 44S, Postal Laws and Regulations, to wit: 
1. — That the names and addresses of the publisher, 
editor, managing editor, and the business manager, 
are: Publisher, Leslie-Judge Company, 225 5th Ave., 
New York, N. Y.; Editor, Jessie Niles Burness, 
225 5th Ave., New York, N. Y.; Managing Editor, 
Perriton Maxwell, 225 5th Ave., New York, N. Y.; 
Business Manager, Reuben P. Sleicher, 225 5th Ave., 
New York, N. Y. 2. — That the owner is, and stock- 
holders owning or holding 1 per cent, or more of 
total amount of stock, are : Owner. Leslie-Judge 
Company, 245 5th Ave., New York, N. Y., Stock- 
holders, John A. Sleicher. 225 5th Ave., New York, 
N. Y.. Anthony N. Brady Estate, 54 Wall St., New 
York, N. Y. 8.— That the known bondholders, 
mortgagees, and other security holders owning or 
hold ing 1 per cent, or more of total amount of bonds, 
mortgages or other securities, are: JohnA. Sleicher, 
225 5th Ave., New York, N. Y.; Mary Peckham 
Sleicher, 710 Madison Ave., Albany, N. Y.; Reuben 
P. Sleicher, 225 5th Ave., New York, N. Y.; City 
Real Estate Company, 176 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y.: Anthony N. Brady Estate, 54 Wall Street, 
New York. N. Y. 4. — That the two paragraphs next 
above, giving the names of the owners, stockholders 
and security holders, contain not only the list of 
stockholders and security holders as they appear 
upon the books of the company, but also, in cases 
where the stockholder or security holder appears 
upon the books of the company as trustee or in any 
other fiduciary relation, the name of the person or 
corporation for whom such trustee is acting, is 
given: also that the said two paragraphs contain 
statements embracing affiant's full knowledge and 
belief as to the circumstances and conditions under 
which stockholders and security holders who do not 
appear upon the books of the company as trustees, 
hold stock and securities in a capacity other than 
that of a bonaflde owner; and this affiant has no 
reason to believe that any other person, associa- 
tion or corporation has any interest direct or indi- 
rect in the said stock, bonds or other securities 
than as so stated by him. REUBEN P. SLEICHER. 
(Signature of the Business Manager.) 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 21st day 
of March. 1918. A. EDWARD ROLLAUER, Notary 
Public, Queens County No 962: Certificate filed 
in New York County No. 201; New York County 
Register's No. 9165; Commission Expires March 80th, 
1919. 



Making the Heart Throb 
with the Camera 

(Continued from a previous page) 
to think I should introduce the "eternal 
triangle." I was assured that this is 
the type of story the public wants. 
Well, maybe the critics know better 
than I do, but I have far too much faith 
in the film public to believe that, as a 
class, they desire to see only sex dramas. 

I believe the American people wish 
to see reflections of their own lives, of 
the lives of the hesitating foreigners 
who come to these shores seeking their 
' ' Land of Promise. ' ' I like best those 
of my pictures which deal with the raw 
material that comes into this country to 
be assimilated through the tremendous 
"melting pot" we call New York City. 

I want my boy, "Bob White," to be- 
come an actor. This is fortunate, per- 
haps, for it is as inevitable as that 
smoke shall rise. He is to "the man- 
ner born," and from his first picture, 
"A Roadside Impresario," where he 
actually danced into the film without 
being invited, he has shown himself a 
clever little player. Not once does he 
look at the"tamina," as he calls it, 
although after the scenes are taken it 
seems to hold a fascination for him, 
for he spends hours with the camera 
man. 

Yes, I want him to be an actor — but 
a good one. I'd like him to keep up 
the standards I have tried to set, to 
overcome even more of the screen diffi- 
culties than I have been able to meet. 
By the time Bob White has reached my 
age, there will be perfect color pic- 
tures. It has been said this would tire 
the eye; that watching the changing, 
shifting color effects would distract the 
attention and detract from the value of 
the story itself. These and all other ob- 
stacles will be overcome. Then will 
the screen have everything which the 
spoken drama has to offer — except the 
human voice. Possibly in some far dis- 
tant day, "after the war," Edison or 
some other inventor will perfect a syn- 
chronizing talking machine and motion 
picture. This, however, I have not 
deeply considered, for with carefully 
written plays, where only a few titles 
are necessary, the "silent drama" can 
continue to be silent and compelling. 



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The Comments and Criti- 
cisms of a Free Lance 

(Continued from o previous page) 

reflection on the art of acting ! Most 
actresses who win a big success on the 
dramatic stage have traveled a long and 
hard road thereto. Ask the three I have 
mentioned ! That there is no royal road 
to acting was true before the movie 
came. It is true no longer. Movie 
stars are made overnight by publicity 
men. Such is June Caprice. Everyone 
knows the story that is told of how Mae 
Marsh rose from a cash girl in a depart- 
ment store in Los Angeles to be one of 
the biggest stars in motion pictures. 
Her rise was not exactly overnight, but 
very nearly overnight. It was at least 
over a royal road. 

The public prints often carry such 
headlines as this: "Unknown Girl Gets 
Movie Start." Then will follow the 
story: "A girl of more than average 
beauty and intelligence was needed in 
a hurry. A telephone operator at the 
studio was recalled as filling these re- 
quirements. She was hurriedly sent for, 
given a few directions, and in thirty 
seconds found herself a celebrity. She 
was said by the director-in-chief to have 
'features that photographed like a mil- 
lion dollars.' She is now well started 
on her way to screen fame." If that 
isn't a royal road, what is? 

Nobody Knows, but Here's a 
Good Guess 

What is the proper length of a film? 
What is the proper length of a novel? 
What is the proper length of a drama? 
What is the proper length of a poem? 
It would seem that the motion picture 
belonged in that class of art where vol- 
ume did not matter. Tragedies have 
been told in four pages by the great 
French masters. Edgar Lee Masters 
tells a life story in six lines of verse. 
Joseph Conrad relates his wonderful 
tales in stories running from two to 
three hundred pages. Bret Harte and 
O. Henry told theirs in ten pages some- 
times. There are poems long and poems 
short. In a motion picture theater, 
where the time of the numbers compris- 
ing a program can be broken up, it 
would seem that any length movies that 
are good movies might be both profitably 
and entertainingly shown. Why must 
the so-called "feature" be always five 
reels? The true feature is often the 
one-reel scenic or educational film. 
Only in movies does length mean class. 




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MOVIE ACTING! 

A fascinating profession that pays big. Would you 
like to know if you are adapted to this work ? Send 10c. 
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Why I Left My Mustache Behind 



By Charlie Chaplin 




A 



FIRST NAT L EX 



Charlie Chaplin says 

' 'selling bonds is not 

'A Dog's Life.'" 




T THE sub-treasury building in New York, 

they took us through the vaults after we 

finished our Liberty Loan speeches. From 

one of the vaults they pulled ten stacks of 

bills, each about as big as a brick, and piled them in 

my arms. "Mr. Chaplin," said our escort, "you 

are now holding $100,000,000 in your hands." And 

I never batted an eyelash. 

But I'd rather hold the attention of 100,000,000 
people while telling them of the necessity for buying 
Liberty Bonds. I'm serious about this. That's why 
I left my mustache behind when I started out on the 
tour with "Doug" and "Mary." Somebody called 
us "the big three," and somebody else called it "the 
trinity's trip," and somebody else said we were "on deck with a king, queen 
and joker." I suppose they meant Fairbanks for the joker. 

Anyway, it was a wonderful experience. Everywhere people turned out by the 
thousands, yes, tens of thousands. And if any cynic thinks the public was more 
interested in us than the Liberty Loan, I'm sorry, for we've all got to get interested 
in this governmental financial support if we are to carry through the war success- 
fully. Film stars we have with us always, but the opportunity to do our own big bit, 
to make our own sacrifice when we want to 
make it, doesn't come often in a lifetime; 
it's a matter of pride to us that we were 
able to grasp the opportunity when it came. 

When Wall Street Overflowed 

By Douglas Fairbanks 

I BELIEVE there are eighty million people who 
used to live in Iowa, and I've shaken hands 
with all of 'em. Everywhere I went, I got it 
— Washington, New York, Philadelphia, Sag- 
inaw, Michigan, Toledo, Kenosha, Wisconsin, Ra- 
cine, Milwaukee, Cleveland, St. Louis — all the rest. 
"Howdy, Doug? I'm from Iowa!" 

"Iowa, eh? Fine State that ! Howdy? Howdy?" 

It was strenuous, that Liberty Loan tour. I'm 
not used to the "one-night stand" business any 
more, but I like it when the cause is good. Between 
you and me, though, I wouldn't do it for any 
other government in the world, not even Paraguay 
or Uruguay. 

I think the three of us all got stage fright down at the New York sub-treasury, 
that day. Chaplin and I were there together, and I held him up with one arm. Now, 
Charlie's not hard to hold, because he's light, and because he is a handy little acro- 
bat and knows how to balance himself to perfection. But after our speech-making 
he said: "How did you do it, Doug? Do you realize you held me up there for almost 
three minutes?" It was just sheer nervousness that enabled me to do it. 

It was the largest crowd I've ever seen in Wall Street. I used to be a broker 
down there, and they never had crowds like that in the Street then. 

I'm as hoarse as a crow, and even my pen needs a cough drop, but I'll still main- 
tain to my last whisper that we've got to get behind our government now and all the 
time. Later on we may be called on for heavy sacrifices, whether we want to sacri- 
fice or not. The more we want to work, 




PARAMOUNT-ARTCRAFT 



'Liberty Loan tours are 
great fun" says Doug- 
las Fairbanks. 



nee or not. The more we want to work, «V » 

to help, to sacrifice now, the less of it we'll IvV / **/ / 

have to do by and by. AJVw U^, ^U*™rU~~+~» 




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Hooverizing to Beat the 
(Waist) Band 

Some Simple Remedies for War- 
Time Obesity 
By Fatty (Roscoe) Arbuckle 




PARAMOUNT-ARBUCKLE 



"We propose to indulge in laughter, 
kind thoughts and good deeds, Hoov- 
er or no Hoover," says Arbuckle. 

THOSE who acquire fat should 
eat more and more. Use the 
reverse diet, and you will find 
that you will soon eat your- 
self out of house and home. When 
your home is gone, you will worry and 
wilt away, until you have assumed 
sylph-like proportions, becoming a 
credit to the tailors' union and the 
lounge lizard palaces. 

I append some answers to misguided 
humans who have been ruining their 
figures by following the too slick ad- 
vice of so-called medical sharps. Here 
are a few specimen letters: 

Dearest Fatty : 

I admit that I have a modest appe- 
tite. I usually eat forty-nine eggs for 
breakfast. Do you think I should eat 
one more and make it fifty? 

A. Hennery. 

Answer: 
Dear Hen : 

Why make a hog of yourself for one 
egg? 

My only Doctor : 

You know, I am very stout, and I 
suffer from loss of sleep. What is good 
for insomnia? Ima Wake. 

Answer : 
Wakeful Ima : 

Try four Welsh rarebits just before 
going to bed. This is the best thing 
for insomnia. 



j^osszaJLte, 




The jolliest, richest 
book ever written 
about the screen world 

FILM FOLK 



Close -U ps of the Men, 
Women, and Children 
Who Make the Movies 

By Rob Wagner 

A book of humor and entertaining facts. 
It is a sort of Los Angeles Canterbury 
Tales wherein appear the stories, told in 
the first person, of the handsome film actor 
whose beauty is fatal to his comfort ; of 
the child wonder; the studio mother; the 
cameraman, who " shoots the films" ; the 
scenario writer; the "extra" man and 
woman, whose numbers are as the sands 
of the sea; the publicity man, who "rings 
the bells, ' ' etc. , etc. 

All the stories are located in or near 
Los Angeles, a section more densely popu- 
lated with makers of ' ' movies' ' than any 
other section on earth. The author lives 
there, he has been in sympathetic contact 
with these votaries of this new art since 
its beginning, and his statements are en- 
tirely trustworthy. 

"Film Folk" is not a series of actual 
biographies of individuals; the author in 
each case presents an actor, a director or 
one of the other characters for the sake of 
concreteness and to carry out the story- 
form, and he contrives to set forth in the 
course of the book the entire movie- 
making world. The reader gets a clear 
idea of how the films are made, and he is 
immensely entertained with the accounts 
of the manners and customs of the inhab- 
itants of the vast movie villages — manners 
and customs unique in many respects. 

The stories are told in a style as easy to 
read as the author is good-humored. 



A large octavo with 32 illustrations 
Price $2. OO All bookstores 



Published by 

THE CENTURY CO. 

New York City 




mm 



THESE MOTHERS' SONS 
ARE FIGHTING FOR YOU 

25 Cents Lent to the Government Will Help Save a Soldier's Life 



THESE God-given women — over a mil- 
lion strong — are giving their boys to 
make this a safe world for you and for 
me. And they ask nothing in return. Gladly 
they give what is more to them than their own 
lives without even a single complaint. Per- 
haps you and I can't go to war; perhaps we're 
needed at home. But that doesn't let us out. 
We've got to do our bit just the same. 

And now comes Uncle Sam and says: "Lend 
me your pennies — 25 cents at a time. I need 
them to help win this war and to save our 
boys' lives." 

For today wars are fought with money, and 
every penny counts. 25 cents isn't much. 
It's a sum you can easily spare every few 
days, and you'll probably never miss it. But 
just think what 25 cents multiplied by a hun- 
dred million — the number of people in this 
country — amounts to. It's twenty-five mil- 
lion dollars ! So you see, your pennies are 

needed — no 
matter how few 
you can spare. 



You Don't Give — You Lend 

The mothers of this nation are giving the lives of their 
boys — yet you are not asked to give your money, but to 
lend it at 4% interest. 

How can any man or woman, any boy or girl, fail to serve and lend 
their pennies when their mothers are giving the lives of their boys. 

And your money is as safe as your country. WAR SAVINGS 
STAMPS are backed by the entire United States and issued by 
the Government. 

Surely there isn't a single person out of the hundred million who 
will fail to heed this call-for-thrift from good old Uncle Sam. 



How You Can Make Your Quarters Work for You 

There are two kinds of War Savings Stamps — 25c. Thrift Stamps and $5 
Stamps. The $5 stamps sell for $4.17 during June, 1918, and for lc. ad- 
ditional each month thereafter, during 1918. That is, $4.17 in June, 
$4.18 in July, etc. The government will pay you $5 for each of these 
W. S. S. in January, 1923. 

The 25c. stamps sell at all times for 25c. — The price does not change. 
When you buy your first 25c. stamp at the post office or any bank or 
store, you will be given a Thrift Card with spaces for sixteen 25c. 
stamps ($4 worth). 

When the card is filled take it to the post office, pay 17c. additional — if 
you do it in June, after that lc. additional each month, and you will 
receive a $5 stamp, which is described above. 




WS.S. 

WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

ISSUED BY THE 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



Contributed through Division 
of Advertising 



Your Money Back. If you are obliged to sell your $5 stamp any 
time before January, 1923, the Govornment will buy it back from 
you at more than you paid for it. Its value increases lc. each 
month, as it earns interest. 

War Savings Stamps are for sale at post offices, banks, depart- 
ment stores, cigar stores, and other authorized agencies. 

National War Savings Committee 

Washington 



United States Gov't. Comm. 
on Public Information 




This space contributed for the Winning of the War by 
PUBLISHERS OF FILM FUN 




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This is the offer of The Oliver Typewriter Company itself — a 
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The Oliver Typewriter Company gives this guarantee: The Oliver 
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the Oliver Nine. 

Don't turn over this page without clipping the coupon. 

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The Oliver Typewriter Co. 

266 Oliver Typewriter Bldg., 
Chicago, 111. 



USED BY BIG BUSINESS 

It is the same commercial machine used 
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ilm 



And The Magazine 
of Fun, Judge's 
Library and Sis Hopkins' 
Own Book Combined 



tin 



Price 10 Cents 

JULY 

19 18 



NOTICE TO 
READER. 

When you finish read- 
ing this magazine, place 
a one-cent stamp on this 
notice, mail the maga- 
zine, and it will be 
placed in the hands of 
our soldiers or sailors 
destined to proceed 
overseas. 

NO WRAPPING 
—NO ADDRESS. 







Specially Posed for 
FILM FUN and 
drawn from life 
by LOU MAYER 



COPYRIGHTED, 1918, BY FILM FUN 



LlLA LEE 
The Youngest Star in the Film Firmament 





rOU have lost the knack of 
building them — you know it! 
Right? No, wrong. 

Build your Castles in Spain. 

They will come to you again as you 
watch pictute-plays — the magnificent 
productions of Paramount and Art- 
craft, rich with stars, superbly di- 
rected, wonderfully staged, and clean 
as sunshine. 

Day-dreams, day-dreams, every man 
is entitled to them occasionally. They 
help him on. He is not a machine. 

Paramount and Artcraft motion 
pictures have brought more to us 
Americans than we have yet realized. 



Their closeness to our own deepest 
emotions has caused us to live more 
vividly — to see life out of other peo- 
ple's eyes — to develop a more gen- 
erous personal philosophy. 

Paramount and Artcraft motion 
pictures give a man a better feeling 
towards Smith in the next street — 
make him ready to reconsider his 
opinion of his worst enemy. Sounds 
like religion, but it isn't — it's just 
you, you yourself with the shell off, 
magic'd off by the foremost stars — 
superbly directed — in clean motion 
pictures — nameworthy to be called 
Paramo un t! A rt craft! 



t 



paramount ^(3Hwc& 

jHotlon CpLctur&s " 

C7"7 1X7 . Ty how to be sure o) seeing Paramount 

lnree WayS tO KnOW and Artcraft Motion Pictures 



0726 By seeing these trade- 
marl:: or names in the advertise- 
ments of your local theatres. 



tWO By seeing these trade- 
marks or names on the front of 
the theatre or in the lobby. 



tflf*€6 By seeing these trade- 
marks or names Hashed on the 
screen inside the theatre. 



FAMOUS PLAYERS -LASKY CORPORATION* 

r General 



ADOLPH ZUKOR Pres. JESSE L.1ASKY Vice Pres. CECIL B.DE MLLE Director General 
• rNEW YORK-/ - 




"FOREMOST STARS. SUPERBL Y DIRECTED. IN CLEAN MOTION PICTURES " 




»-.» 



©CI.B4 14700 

M 12/3/8 / 




TARAMtlUNT-SENNRTT 



Teddy } canine comedian with the Mack Sennett Company, does not enjoy these hairbreadth escape scenes. 



Film Fun 

225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

An Independent Illustrated Monthly Magazine 
Devoted to the Best Interests of All 
Motion Picture Art and Artists 

JULY- 19 18 



o 



n 



n 



s 



ILLUSTRATED FEATURES: 

Making a Name for Myself in Movies 
Winning by a Nose 
My Bit in the World's Work 
How "Innocent" Was Filmed 
The Lion in the Movies 
Wliat Kind of Movies Do Our Soldiers 
Like? 

COMMENTS OF A FREE LANCE: 

Following the Footprints of Father 

Time 
The Flood of Prosperity Knows No 

Ebb-tide Here 
Like Real Fairy Tales Come Trite 
Grand Opera Fame Blazes the Trail 

to Screen Triumph 
Goldwyn Remaking "The Eternal 

Magdalene" 
Constance Talmadge in "The Studio 

Girl" 



Lila Lee 
Alice Brady 
Madge Evans 
Fannie Ward 
Mme. Lina Cavalieri 

Private C. V. Combe 



Linda A. Griffith 



The Press Agent Solves the Riddle 

of the Sphynx 
No Chance at All for the Truth 

PICTURE REVIEWS OF: 

"Hearts of the World," "The Biggest Show on Earth," 
"The Moonshiners " "Pay Day," "A Dog's Life." 
EDITORIALS: 

A Word to the Wise 
Greater Love Hath No Man 
The Proper Length of a, Film 
Nothing But the Truth 
Sublimated Common Sense 

MISCELLANEOUS: 

Movie Stars of the East 

Star Styles 

Practice Makes Perfect 

ART PORTRAITS: 

Lila Lee, Emmy Wehlen, Clara Kimball Young, Alice Brady, 
Veta Searl. 



Michael Gross 



sioo a year 



Number 351 



10c a copy 




r ■ ■ ,.i, iiiiiiiiiliiiil 



lllllll 



■■ : iiiiiia 



I'ARAMOUNT-LASKY 



Lila Lee, whose first appearance as a movie star will be in "One Hundred Per Cent. American." The 
play relates to the work of woman in the war, and the reconstruction which must follow it. 



Making a Name for Myself in the Movies 



A Rising Star Tells- Us Her Fortune 
By Lila Lee 




American girl, and hope my pictures may bring pleasure 
to schoolgirls and girls who work, because I believe those 
girls like to see stories about themselves. They love fairy 
tales and adventurous stories, of course, but the American 
girl likes best of all to see stories about things that might 
have happened to her— simple stories with perhaps a love 
theme worked in and lots of fun and pretty clothes. 

So now I have told you what I hope to do and "how I 
like being in movies." There's not much more to tell 
"you-all," as my Southern mammy used to say, except that 
I'm very, very happy at being able to come to you— so 
many more of you than I used to see from the stage— and 
that I shall do my best to make you like me quite 
as much as you did as "Cuddles." 



ipmim mill hum I' nun miimmnm um mi 



iMiiiiiimiiiiimNiiiiNiitiiiij 



1 (Editor's Note: When Cuddles" was 

| seven years old, Gus Edwards saw her 

f playing ' Ring-around-Rosie" in Union 

1 Hill, N. J., and engaged her for vaude 

| ville. Now, seven years later, Jesse L. 

I Lasky, seeing her in "The Kiddies' Re- 

I vue," has engaged her for star parts in 

| the great producing company of which 

I he is vice-president, under a five-year 

i contract. She began work on her first 

I picture early in June at the California 

I studios. Here is her own story of how 

I it all happened. It just proves that 
seven is her lucky number. 

ntimiiimimimmmiiiiimmmmmmi Mmiimmmmiiiiimimiimmiimimmi mimiiimii 



GREETINGS, everybody! \ 

For years — that is, I 
mean, since I learned to read at all, about six 
or seven years ago — I've been reading movie 
magazines and envying the great screen stars who were 
all the time being asked to write for them. And here I 
am, asked to write my own story for Film Fun. 

To those of you who have seen me on the stage as 
"Cuddles, " there will not be much to say. You know how 
I love fun and adventure and, above all, pretty clothes. 
Being in pictures is going to mean lots of all three. And 
it's going to mean meeting such famous stars as Billie 
Burke, Elsie Ferguson, Mary Pickford, Bill Hart, Douglas 
Fairbanks and many others, because I am to work in Para- 
mount and Artcraft pictures. 

At the studio everything seems queer and upside down 
from stage ways, but I liked it. For instance, the rehear- 
sals—perhaps an hour or so on each scene, and then it is 
taken and finished forever and ever. On the stage I used 
to get very, very tired of it before I ever got a chance to 
go through it before the footlights. 

In the parts I play I want to be just a typical, everyday 




PARAMOUNT 



Fun and adventure and pretty clothes 
will be part of my new 
work. 



■all 



E D 



O R 



I 



A 



A Word to the Wise 

PRODUCERS will be obliged sooner or later to give 
due consideration to criticism from overseas. It 
might be the part of wisdom to censor the scena- 
rio before staging the play, rather than to search 
afterward for reasons why certain plays fail. We are led 
to make this suggestion by the headline of a news story — 
"American Movies Criticised in Africa." The story re- 
lates that the American consul at Lourenco Marques, East 
Africa, reports that newspapers in that locality condemn 
many film offerings on the ground that they "misrepresent 
the uniform high sense of justice characteristic of the 
American people." Respect for American justice and fair 
play will be hard to maintain if film plays sent to the world 
market in the Eastern Hemisphere make heroes of those 
who do not "play a square game." The camera is very 
convincing. The reputation we now have is worth safe- 
guarding. In tho long run the cost of not doing so will be 
ruinous. 

Greater Love Hath No Man 

IT IS naturally pleasing to have ideas sprouted in Film 
Fun taking root. When our friends take seriously a 
magazine supposed to be devoted to the funny side of 
1 the films, we feel entitled to praise. Film Fun has 

had a project very dear to its heart for some time — that of 
establishing a home for convalescent soldiers, to be fos- 
tered by the moving picture industry, because that industry 
has proportionately as many stars in its service flag as any 
other important industry in the country. Now we find the 
newspapers reporting that such a project has been launched 
in Los Angeles, sponsored by Cecil B. De Mille, David Wark 
Griffith, Thomas H. Ince, Mack Sennett, Charlie Chaplin, 
George Beban, William D. Taylor, Dustin Farnum, William 
S. Hart, Jesse L. Lasky, Frank Keenan and J. Stuart Black- 
ton. With such good men back of so good a proposition, 
is there a doubt of its ultimate success? These are the 
days when many calls are made on the patriotism, time 
and service of all of us, and the time is coming when we 
will have to do more. Could there be any better way to 
do our share than to help others, who have served for us, 
to help themselves when they return after gallant service 
in need of any aid that we can give? We believe we have 
kindled a flame which, fanned by enthusiasm, will sweep 
the country. We hope New York will not be far behind 
Los Angeles in taking up such good work. If everybody 
takes hold with good will, a very small contribution from 
each will total an enormous figure, and "the boys" are en- 
titled to the best that our love and patriotism can give them. 

The Proper Length of a Feature Film 

INDICATIONS are not lacking that a good many fans 
are becoming able critics of scenarios. The next 
logical step will have been taken when exhibitors 
realize from box-office returns that a poor play dims 
the luster of the brightest star. And, on the other hand, a 
good play stands a chance of becoming a classic. Re- 



issues of old films are winning a good deal of popularity. 
One of the interesting revelations connected with them is 
that, in perfecting ■ technique, producers too often have 
added nothing but footage. The same story that used to 
be told in two reels is now stretched to the five- or six-reel 
feature now in vogue, and the action is hampered and de- 
layed by sub- titles, lighting novelties and other tricks of 
the trade which are inexcusable if they impede the action. 
"The play's the thing." Two excellent examples of recent 
plays in which the film tells its own uninterrupted story 
are "Revelation" and "Hearts of the World." If movies 
are to fulfill their great destiny as teachers and leaders of 
all the people, they must eliminate the frivolous and use- 
less, instead of exalting the trivial, as seems to be the 
practice now even with gifted directors. 

Nothing But the Truth 

THE MERRY press agent has lately been under dis- 
cussion. It must be a bit of a novelty to him to 
occupy the spotlight, and when the trade papers 
insist on putting him there, and turn red, yellow, 
orange, blue and green light screens on him with great ra- 
pidity, they get him all mixed up. 

Then it becomes the privilege of his friends to interpose 
and urge that nice line of distinction which Lincoln was 
the first to draw between the sinner and the sin. As mat- 
ter of fact, the press agent is fine. Not infrequently he's 
"a prince of good fellows." We're for him. When the 
time comes that he should go, he's entitled to the line pro- 
posed by Robert Louis Stevenson, "Here lies one who 
meant well, tried a little, failed much." 

But his sins of omission and commission are many and 
grievous. All stars look alike to him. He lays too much 
stress on the little things. His manipulation of the veri- 
ties is such that nobody believes his stories. The dear 
fellows could afford to tell the truth, maybe not the whole 
truth, but surely nothing but the truth. It would pay. If 
he receives from five to fifteen thousand dollars a year for 
tampering with facts, what a rich reward awaits the 
pioneer who will confine himself to the truth ! 

Sublimated Common Sense 

A TURMOIL prevails throughout the motion picture 
industry. Producers have each a favorite remedy 
to urge. Many of them are convinced that over- 
production is the largest contributing factor. A 
few of them are convinced that reckless waste and extrava- 
gance are leading to ruin, as they usually do. One in- 
spired leader in film enterprises has put the problem 
squarely where it belongs, and offers a solution so simple 
it is a wonder no one has suggested it before. He says : 
"If we used a little more horse sense in the picture busi- 
ness as an offset to the artistic temperament we seem to 
think is essential, perhaps we would not find it necessary 
to hold so many useless conventions in large hotels to dis- 
cuss the motion picture situation. We know what the sit- 
uation is. Any level-headed business man knows enough 
to retrench when retrenching is necessary." 



Comments and Criticisms of a Free-Lance 

By Linda A. Griffith 

(Mrs. David W. Griffith) 

{Editor's Note: The writer, who began her career with the Biograph Company, is well known in the moving 

picture world. Her latest success was as star in her own striking sociological play "Charity." She is a 

keen critic and analyst of all that pertains to motion picture art, and tells the truth about those who 

are either striving for its downfall or working for its advancement. ) 



Following the Footprints of Father Time 

IN THE year 1909 the Biograph Company, who gave to 
the movie world David W. Griffith, Mary Pickford, 
Mack Sennett, Henry Walthall, Mabel Normand, 
Henry Lehrman and others, rented a lot in Los An- 
geles and spent about a thousand dollars in laying a floor 
for a stage and building two rough dressing-rooms the size 
of individual bathhouses. Here movies were made ! A 
store was rented in town, which was used as a projection 
room, where the films were developed, dried, cut and 
spliced. That was the only motion picture studio in the 
city of Los Angeles then. The other day I motored out 
Sunset Boulevard to Hollywood, now the cen- 
ter of the world's movie activity. Million- 
dollar studios have sprung up like mush 
rooms on all sides, the latest being 
the immense structure that will 
take care of William Fox's mo 
tion picture productions. 

Towering above the neigh- 
boring bungalows and framed 
against the foothills of Holly- 
wood rise the walls of Baby- 
lon, palace steps and decor- 
ative elephants all intact and 
representing the Babylonian 
period in "Intolerance." 
Strangely weird, and gro- 
tesque they appear in sleepy 
Hollywood ! But what an 
awful waste of wood to let 
it stand when it has passed 
its usefulness! I could not 
help think, having just come 
from New York, where I 

had seen little children, on days when the thermometer 
recorded below zero, carting home the wood from broken 
boxes or begging a pound or two of coal. 

Across the way stands the studio that was formerly 
"Fine Arts," now retained by Mr. Griffith and where were 
produced portions of "Hearts of the World." What in 
1912 was a couple of acres on which stood two simple cot- 
tages with fruit orchards, secured for a studio by the Kine- 
macolor Company of America, is now a solid mass of 
buildings, painted green, that look very much like a fac- 
tory and not one bit like a home of art, but which in truth 
is the Griffith studio. Mr. Fox's immense studio is near- 
ing completion close by; Lasky's fine plant is one of this 
colony. William Hart's neat little building is new to the 
visitor. Charlie Chaplin's new million-dollar studio, rep- 




resenting a quaint English setting, is a joy to behold. 
Universal City looks just the same. 

Theda Bara rides about the streets of Los Angeles in a 
motor car crushed strawberry in color, herself wrapped up 
in crushed strawberry veils. Edna Purviance, Charlie 
Chaplin's leading woman, whom I had always thought 
beautiful on the screen, quite took my breath away when I 
saw her in real life. She is radiant. Marshall Neilan, 
Jr., who had not put in an appearance when I left Los An- 
geles three years ago, is now a chubby youngster, much 
like his mother, Gertrude Bambrick, of old Biograph fame, 
and much like his father, the clever director. Louise Huff 
was dainty and beautiful as ever in a wonderful new red 
Easter bonnet with cherries on it. George Nich- 
ols, also of old Biograph, and later Than- 
houser, and [who has contributed won- 
derful work in a small scene in 
"Hearts of the World," is look- 
ing as handsome as ever and 
quite as young. Mrs. Leona 
Ross, the beautiful sister of 
the beautiful Lillian Russell, 
is also one of the motion 
picture colony, her son-in- 
law, Jack Brammall, having 
been a member of the coast 
contingent since the days of 
Kinemacolor. Thos. Jefferson, 
whom I last saw when I worked 
with him in Belasco and 
De Mille's "The Wife," 
produced some years ago by 
Biograph, Klaw and Erlanger, 
is also an "Angeleno." 
There are many, many others 
who have remained in Los 
Angeles since they made their first pilgrimage Westward. 



Griffith 



The Flood of Prosperity Knows No Ebb-tide Here 

I wonder how much money the motion picture industry 
brings into the city of Los Angeles — all Eastern money it 
is, too! This money stays in Los Angeles; it does not go 
back East where it came from. There are apartment 
houses without number in which every apartment is occu- 
pied by movie people, and bungalow courts in which every 
one of the dozen bungalows comprising the court is rented 
by photoplayers. The story is told of a classy, high-grade 
apartment building that was erected in Los Angeles and 
which was only to house wealthy New Yorkers. It was to 
be something distinctive and expensive, such as is to be 
found on New York City's Park Avenue. The one thing 




the players, and there is much prosperity. Numbers are so homesick for 
New York they would take the first train back if they had the price. They 
live in the hope that some day they may. Some of the actors have com- 
fortable little homes with wife and children. Some who have always 
earned a very modest salary, and who have lived simply and not squan- 
dered, own their own little bungalows and two or three others, from which 
they get a nice income. Others who have been earning hundreds of 
dollars a week, and lost their jobs when the general retrenchment and 
cutting down of productions due to the war began, are wondering now 
how they are to pay their income tax. So runs the story — the shiftless, 
the unfortunate, the spendthrift ! Prosperity and pinching poverty clasp 
hands on the studio lot. 
Grand Opera Fame Blazes the Trail to Screen Triumph 
To analyze the screen popularity of the grand opera singer who 
makes a detour into movieland is an interesting pastime. Of the three 
internationally famous opera singers who have sojourned in the film 
world, Geraldine Farrar, Mary Garden and Lina Cavalieri, the first 
named is the only one who has contributed to the screen acceptable 



FIRST NATIONAL EXHIBITORS 



LtTMIERE PHOTO 



Who was the author of " smileage ?" 
Edna Purviance ought to answer. 

insisted upon was that it would house no or- 
dinary movie folks. The house neared com- 
pletion, was completed and awaited occu- 
pants. The Easterners with their pockets 
full of money did not deluge the place, and 
it began to look like failure, when, lo! the 
ban on movie actors was removed and the 
house filled up. They were the only ones 
who had the price and were willing to pay. 

Like Real Fairy Tales Come True 

Douglas Fairbanks's palatial residence 
was pointed out to me, as also Mary Pick- 
ford's white house, which is almost hidden 
from view, being set in the center of a solid 
block of orange trees. She had just bought her 
brother Jack a new Cadillac, so I was told, and to 
her sister Lottie she has given many wonderful 
gems. They say she has taken care of the family 
since her years numbered ten. Seemed strange to 
recall nine short years ago, when Mary had a room 
at a boarding house on Hill Street, Los Angeles, 
called "The Lille," which she left, taking a room 
at the New Broadway Hotel with her brother Jack 
for $4.50 per week. Jack was nine years old then, 
and Mary allowed him fifty cents a night for his 
dinner. 

The story of the movies, one must confess, 
does sometimes read quite as magical as the 
Arabian Nights tales. But there are many hard- 
luck stories told. There is much poverty among 




In "The Studio 
Girl ' ' Constance 
Talmadge has a 
part that fits much 
better than this 
frock. 



motion picture acting. As spoken of previously in these columns, 
Mary Garden and Lina Cavalieri as motion picture actresses are un- 
interesting personalities devoid of screen magnetism and utterly lack- 
ing in motion picture technique. As a large part of the public can- 
not afford expensive grand opera prices, even if they live in a city 
where grand opera is given, they flock to the movies to see these celeb- 
rities on the screen. 

Being temporarily domiciled thirty-five hundred miles from New 
York City, in San Francisco, Cal., where art rations, so far as drama 
and the opera are concerned, are on a starvation basis, I find is quite 
a different proposition to living in New York City, where the talent 
and brains of the world come to sell their goods— where every night 
in the week, during the long winter season, something fine in the way 
of a play or music can be enjoyed. One need not wonder why, in 
towns and cities remote from the Eastern metropolis, the people go 
quite crazy when they have a chance to see in a movie the artists they 
have read about all their lives and lived in dreams of some day see- 
ing. A hero wor- 
ship is accorded to 
grand opera singers 
that is not given to 
artists in other 
lines. Thousands of 
homes have victrolas 
with records of 
these singers, and 
naturally they want 
to see, if only 
through the flicker- 
ing shadows on a 
movie screen, the 
possessor of the 
voice they have 
grown to love and 
reverence. Judging 
"movies" as "mov- 





f * ■ \ . 


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CHARLOTTE FAISCHrtD PHOTO 



«es, 



'Thais" and 



Even rarer than a day in June is Lina Cavalieri' s ability to adapt 
herself in mood and pose to her summer holiday setting. 




PARAMOUNT 

Marvelous trailing gowns and queer jewels of the fifteenth 
century are worn by Mme. Cavalieri in "Gismonda." 



PETROVA PICTURES 

Are triumphs 
worth what they 
cost?" The prob- 
lem is presented in 
"Tempered Steel," 
a June release , 
Olga Petrova, star. 

"Carmen" do not 
win many merit 
marks. As vehicles 
to exploit the physi- 
cal charms of opera singers who dwell on high pedestals 
in thousands of homes, they should be marked 3 E plus. 
One who loves the movies for their own sake resents their 
being used for the exploitation of anyone who has achieved 
fame only in remote and vastly different fields of art ex- 
pression. It is annoying to see heralded as great motion 
picture artists opera singers, novelists, dancers, swimmers, 
skaters and notorious persons. 

Goldwyn Remaking "The Eternal Magdalene" 

After completing a six-reel picture featuring Maxine 
Elliott in "The Eternal Magdalene," and prints of same 
having been distributed, it is announced Goldwyn is to re- 
make the same Whether this is the result of a star's tem- 
perament or the picture is so bad that it should be taken 
over is not known. However, 'tis gossiped the beautiful 
and accomplished Maxine was not the easiest proposition 
in the world to handle. Being a world-famous beauty has 
its handicaps when the "beauty" signs up to appear in a 
motion picture, especially if the beauty has passed her 
sparkling youth. When one has to hold the head "just so" 
to eliminate the photographing of double chins and flabby 
muscles, one cannot lose oneself in the interpretation of a 



dramatic characterization. In these days of Hooverizing, 
and just having emerged from a meatless, wheatless, heat- 
less winter, the time is quite ripe for the "beautyless 
films." They will not be missed. Manufacturers aie be- 
ginning to realize that "beauties" are expensive from other 
standpoints than their salary. If producers would only 
realize that movie audiences have brains as well as eyes! 
If they would, then photoplays with ideas for which the 
public is starving might not be as scarce as hens' teeth. 

Constance Talmadge in "The Studio Girl." 
What Direction Means 

How movie actresses are made and unmade by their 
directors is shown in a recent release of the Select Pictures 
Corporation, "The Studio Girl," with Constance Talmadge 
as the star. For years little Constance Talmadge plodded 
along, doing her bit with the old Vitagraph Company. 
Then one day her sister Norma left Vita and went to Cali- 
fornia as the one featured player of the National Film 
Company, which company, I believe, never actually reached 
the stage of production of pictures. Shortly after this the 
two Talmadge sisters became Triangle stars. Constance 
went her way, not being of much importance about the 
studio, until one day great excitement prevailed at the 
Fine Arts plant. Little Constance Talmadge, to the utter 
amazement of all, had been chosen by Mr. Griffith to play 
the important part of the Mountain Girl in "Intolerance." 
There were some who thought that Mr. Griffith had sud- 
denly gone crazy. They realized the folly of their super- 
ficial judgment later. Constance Talmadge carried off the 
acting honors of "Intolerance" and rose to genuine stardom 
overnight. She surprised everyone. Her triumph proved 
what good direction means to an actress. To see her in 
"The Studio Girl" proved what bad direction can do. She 
struggled through the stupid story as best she could. 
Young, very pretty, full of fire and temperament is Con- 
stance Talmadge. In "The Studio Girl" her youth and 
prettiness only were visible. That all display of talent 
was so lacking is plainly the stage director's fault. As a 
well-known screen star once said: "No screen actor is the 
master of his fate or the captain of his soul." It is up to 
the director to make or mar. 

The Press Agent Solves the Riddle of the Sphinx 

The Moving Picture World of April 13th prints an inter- 
esting letter from the dramatic editor of the Newark Star- 
Eagle, a Mr. Justin Fair. Mr. Fair takes exception to the 
publicity sent out by motion picture studios, especially the 
stories about stars. I heartily agree with Mr. Fair that if 
the press agent would only approximate the truth in the 
telling of a story, it would be far more interesting and 
convincing than the weird, unreasonable, mad tales that 
are told. If Theda Bara were a bit mysterious looking, 
one might like to think of her as being born in the shadow 
of the Sphinx. Outside of her predilection for wearing 
cool, transparent clothing, there is nothing about her that 
might suggest that she first opened her baby eyes on the 
hot desert sands of the Sahara. She suggests Cincinnati, 
where she was born, much more than Cairo. 

I know a young woman who tells of having been in the 
same company with Olga Petrova when Olga was strug- 



gling for a foothold. This girl"s father was the manager 
of the company, and there were then no wild press stories 
being told of Mme. Petrova's birthplace in far-off Russia 
— or is it Poland? — as the story is now related. William 
Fox takes the prize for circulating wild stories about his 
artists. Sonia Markova— simple Gretchen Hartman of a 
former movie day and known to the fans as such — is his 
latest weird concoction. I confess to have "fallen" for 
"Sonia" when I saw her in "Les Miserables," and I had 
worked with her when she was Gretchen Hartman at the 
old Biograph ! So Mr. Fox did his trick well, but not too 
well for the movie fans to uncover. However, somehow, 
"Sonia" did not hit the highest mark, and she is plain 
"Gretchen" once more. I seem to recall having heard 
rumors of her adopting another euphonic nom de plume. 

Mr. Fair's comment on the gushy stories told of male 
stars like Bushman and Kerrigan needs to be heeded. He 
says: "Even young girls who feast their souls on the 
movies day in and day out are not fools exactly. Some 
of the stuff written in Bushman's behalf is fit for the in- 
tellectual nourishment of the inmates of an asylum for 
feeble-minded." There is a limit to the credulity of the 
movie public in accepting impossible stories about stars. 
Whether or not "fans" wish to know (as Mr. Fair says he 
wants the readers of his paper to know) that "mep and 
women of the movies are regular human beings just like we 
are" is a doubt in my mind. I happened one day to be 
with a well-known movie actress while she was doing her 
marketing. A "fan" approached, spoke to the actress of 
how much she enjoyed her latest picture, and then notic- 
ing the order of steak, peas, lettuce, etc., added: "Oh, I 
didn't know that movie actresses ate regular food like I 
did." That happened in Los Angeles ! 

There is a middle course well worth adopting by the 
press agent. A press agent for dramatic stars of a former 
generation once told me some of the unbelievable, far- 
fetched stories then written about stars — the milk bath, 
the diamond robberies and the pursuing army of lovers 
leaving a trail of broken hearts behind. Dramatic stars 
of to-day prefer their press agent to write of them as 
normal humans, as a contented wife or happy mother, as 
have been all the stories told of Ethel Barrymore since 
she started on her maternal career. Let the movie actress 
also adopt a middle course. It would be an interesting 
experiment for some motion picture star to follow Maude 
Adams's quiet way and make herself of real interest by 
reason of her silence. 

No Chance at All for the Truth 

Apropos of the above, the following item in a trade 
paper catches my eye: "Mme. Olga Petrova receives 1,800 
letters weekly from fan admirers, each one answered per- 
sonally by the star herself." Anyone with an ounce of 
gray matter in his head knows that not only Petrova, but 
the prize winner of a stenographers' speed contest could 
barely get out 750 letters of a line each in an eight-hour 
day. But we are told that Petrova, after film acting all 
day, answers 1,800 ! After having been fed up on untruth- 
ful, exaggerated tales such as these, if the ambitious press 
agent ever experiences a change of heart and spins vera- 
cious yarns, no one will believe him. 







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DAVfS AND SANFORD PHOTO 



Emmy Wehlen becomes a photo fan. Posing for portraits is a duty little relished by stars, but 
results such as this, achieved just before she left for California, carry consolation. 




Flash Backs 

Some News Nuggets and Critical Quips 



H 



EDDA NOVA was born in Odessa. She 
wouldn't know the old homestead now ! 



Clara Kimball Young sends greeting to all her friends 
from her studio garden in California. 



Marie Dressier claims to have made Char- 
lie Chaplin famous. The egg said the same of Columbus. 

Mack Sennett is one business man who is always 
willing to show his figures. If you think we are refer- 
ring to bookkeeping — you lose ! 

Jack Pickford as Tom Sawyer impresses the average 
young lady to the extent that she would give a million 
regular dollars to be a boy. 

Francis X. Bushman has a play called "The Brass 
Check." If it's the one we lost, calling for five cents 
in trade, Frank, you may keep it. We are now on the 

w. w. 

Tully Marshall and Raymond Hatton were endeav- 
oring recently to see which could tell the biggest story. 
Theodore Roberts got into the game, and they both quit 
in disgust. 

Dick Barthelmess is off critics for life. One of them 
said the best thing Dick ever done was when he died in 
"War Brides." You know, it's the way a thing is said 
that makes a guy sore ! 

A certain film star has requested his employers to 
pay him every month instead of each week, as usual, 
and what do you think his reason was? Said he wasn't 
able to spend it all in just a week! 

Don't be surprised this summer if your young son 
shows an ambition to become a sailor. William S. Hart 
is putting on some sea pictures, and Peggy Hyland has 
recently completed "Peg o' the Pirates." 

Hoover should get after Doug Fairbanks before he 
exhausts the leading-lady crop. Not satisfied with 
using a different one for every picture, Doug goes and 
squanders two of 'em in "Headin' South." 

Virginia Pearson was born in ol' Kaintuck. And 
like another famous Kentucky product, she brightens 
the eye and quickens the pulse. Only there are no re- 
morseful after-effects from gazing upon Virginia. 

During the taking of the death-bed scene in "Du 
Barry," Theda Bara's tears were induced by the strains 
of a three-piece orchestra playing Massenet's "Elegie." 
Theda should have sent for Wallace Reid and his saxo- 
phone. When Wallie breathes into that thing, everyone 
within two miles bawls. 

This is becoming a "less" and "less" age all the 
time. We're used to seedless oranges, stringless beans, 
tireless cookers, biteless tobacco, smokeless guns, horse- 
less carriages and iceless ice cream, and we have ad- 
justed ourselves pretty well to Hooverizing; but now 
that eugenists want kissless courtships, and their part- 
ners in crime, the censors, want motionless motion pic- 
tures, it is about time to call a halt. 




C. SMITH GABONEE PHOTO 



Alice Brady's father evidently knew that a child with a chin like this wouldn't endure 

being called ' ' a quitter. ' ' 

Winning by a Nose 

A Battle Royal Over a Dominating Proboscis 
By Alice Brady 



WHEN I entered motion pictures, my screen fu- 
ture balanced on the bridge of a tiptilted nose. 
It (the nose) was like one of those unpleasant 
duties which we contrive to keep always ahead 
of us, but at least out of the way, and I had never really 
grasped its awful significance. That it might impede my 
progress in the new venture didn't occur to me at all. 

Since I can remember, the 
stage has been my guiding star. 
Even as a tot I was hypnotized by 
it, and before I was in my teens I 
had broken the news to my father 
that I was going to be a second 
Bernhardt. My years at the con- 
vent where I was educated, in- 
stead of hindering my determin- 
ation, only strengthened it, and I 

shall never forget the joy of those school theatricals. How- 
ever, I was probably the only one who enjoyed them, for I 
invariably tried to boss the whole show. If I played 
Rosalind, in "As You Like It," I knew just exactly how 
the other fellow should play Cecilia or Orlando and I never 




When Alice Brady, actress, turned her 
profile to Alice Brady, judge. 



kept my knowledge to myself. In the light of later years, 
I must have been an obnoxious little busybody ! 

I went almost from the schoolroom to the stage, and 
after winning success in my chosen field, drifted naturally 
enough to the new medium of dramatic expression. The 
filming of my first picture was an interesting experience, 
and I looked forward to seeing it with keen anticipation. 

The jolt, therefore, was unexpect- 
ed. I went into the projection 
room in a flutter of excitement, 
and I came out sadder than Niobe. 
The opening scenes hadn't been 
so bad, but suddenly Alice Brady, 
screen actress, had turned her pro- 
file to Alice Brady, judge, and 
whatever I possessed of self-com- 
placency fled. Could that be my 
nose, apparently standing on end? I was shocked as I'd 
never been before. There was something almost indecent 
in the stand-up way it flaunted its imperfections on the film. 
Up to that moment I hadn't taken the new dramatic art 
very intensely. I had conscientiously put the . best work 



CAMPBELL PHOTO 



possible into my picture, but if anyone had offered me a 
contract on the legitimate stage that called for all of my 
time, I should have left the motion picture field with not a 
twinge of regret. There is a difference, however, in leav- 
ing of one's own free will and being forced out on account 
of deficiencies, and the latter possibility made me gasp. 
It also infuriated me. Who was I to be dominated by a 
nose! 

I went home and laid the 
case before my father. All of 
my fighting Irish was aroused, 
and I regarded the projection 
on my face with hostile dislike. 
For the first time pictures really 
intrigued me, and the thought 
that I might not be able to con- 
tinue in them brought out all 
of my obstinacy. There was 
another aspect to the matter. 
I was one of the first of the 
stage people to enter the film 
world in competition with those 
stars of the screen who had 
mastered its secrets, and the 
idea of failure under the cir- 
cumstances was doubly humili- 
ating. In fact, it was so gall- 
ing that I made up my mind to 
get another nose if necessary. 

My father listened to my 
trouble calmly, until I an- 
nounced my determination to 
have my nose operated on. 
Then he exploded in true Brady 
fashion. 

"I wouldn't have believed 
that a daughter of mine would 
be a quitter!" he remarked 
truculently. 

I stared at him in amaze- 
ment. 

"Quitter!" I echoed. 
"That's just what I'm not 
going to be!" 

He pounded the desk with 
his fist. 

"I call it quitting," he 
maintained, "when you don't 
make good with what you've 
got. If I were in your boots, 
I'd force my audiences to like 

me in spite of my nose. I'd be such a blamed good actress 
that they wouldn't know I had a nose !" 

I got his point then — right between the eyes. And I 
stopped thinking about tucks in my nose. Instead, I got 
down to hard work. I studied the lines of my nose, tried 
out all sorts of poses before the mirror and watched the 
effect of each. In the end I discovered how to hold my 
head before the camera, and when I had made the discov- 
ery, I never let go of it. If you will notice my pictures, 
you will see that in every one my chin is carried high. 




In her new play, ' ' The Ordeal of Rosetta, 
Alice Brady plays four roles. 



The long line of throat is generally attractive, and in my 
case the tilt of my nose is not nearly so apparent with my 
head up. 

But, beyond all that, I worked at film expression. The 
shape of my nose and its proper placing were, after all, 
nominal issues. It had served its purpose in giving me a 
battle royal to stage, and I flung into the struggle for screen 

recognition with all my might. 
I learned all of the camera 
tricks, studied light and shade 
effects, and got the value of 
different colors on the film. 
The deeper I went into it, the 
more it fascinated me, and I 
remembered my history-book 
Alexander with real commis- 
eration. Here was I with a 
brand-new world to conquer, 
and he had cried in vain ! 

And now the years I put in 
at hard labor are still taking 
toll, for work has become an 
unbreakable habit with me. 
When I get a new script, there 
is just one thing that interests 
me until the story has been 
metamorphosed into a photo- 
play, and that is how best to 
secure the finest results. Noth- 
ing else matters. And if it 
becomes necessary to stand on 
my head or to hang over a 
precipice by my toes in order 
to accomplish that end, I am 
there — with life savers maybe 
— but, at any rate, on the job. 
Furthermore, I am never 
quite satisfied, no matter what 
the results; but discourage- 
ment in my case doesn't mean 
quitting. I can never quite 
grasp the mental attitude of a 
person who retires from the 
fray at the initial setback. I 
might make up my mind to 
withdraw at a later date if 
things were going wrong, but 
I'd get in a good wallop first, 
and when I did step down, I'd 
do it because I pleased to and 
hot because I was forced. 
My advice to beginners would be this: if the urge within 
you is irresistible, then take stock, honestly, of all your 
gifts and your handicaps, face the facts, develop a genu- 
ine love for hard work, and success is assured. Work is 
the watchword. 

Getting back to my muttons, I might add that the old 
grievance is laid and that my nose and I are now more in- 
separable than ever. 



CAMPBELL PHOTO 




My Bit in the World's Work 

A Picture Record of One Day's Doings by Madge Evans, Famous Kiddie Star 




Director Knoles discusses the scenario with 
me and makes me like my part. 



If I should die ere set of sun, I pray the Lord my 
work's well done." 



How "Innocent" Was Filmed 

Oriental Customs Followed With Fidelity 
By Fannie Ward 

IN PREPARATION for my appearance in the film version of this 
stage success I studied carefully the contrast between life in the 
West and the East. The difference between the Oriental woman 
and her sister of the Occident is the difference between the 
screen before the photoplay starts and the same screen a few mo- 
ments later, on which a vivid story of life is unfolding. 

In China and Japan people are schooled from the cradle in the subtle 
art of suppressing every visible sign of emotion. This art is developed 
to the highest degree in the woman. In America the face of a woman 
is the mirror of her soul. Her beauty depends upon the spontaneity 
with which every emotion is portrayed. In the Orient the face of a 
woman is a mask, and her beauty depends upon her ability to conceal 
every evidence of emotion, no matter how great the conflict within her. 

This difference was impressed upon me while making "A Japanese 
Nightingale. ' ' I play the part of a Japanese girl who loves her brother, 
from whom she has been separated for three years. The brother re- 
turns unexpectedly. Knowing that Orientals are wont to suppress emo- 
tions, I asked the Japanese actor, who plays the part of the brother, for 
a little inside information. 

"How would your sister greet you, if she loved 
you a great deal and had not seen you for three 
years?" I asked him. "Would she throw herself in 





PATHE 

Occidental display of concern for her sick father could not be stamped out by 

Oriental training. 



The Japanese mother is per- 
mitted to shoiv some affec- 
tion for her boy baby. 

your arms, kiss you and make 
a fuss over you like American 
women under similar circum- 
stances?" 

"Oh, no!" he replied, and 
there was amusement in his 
eyes. "She would approach 
until within about three feet 
of me and bow formally." 

"Is that all?" I asked. 

"Yes, that is all." 

"But," I insisted, "how 
on earth can I 'get it over' on 
the screen that I love my 
brother, that I have missed 
him terribly during his long 
absence, that I am so happy 
he has returned? How can I 
make the audience realize my 
thoughts and emotions by 
standing three feet away from 
him and bowing as though I 
were being introduced to a 
stranger?" 

"A Japanese feels in his 
heart, not in his face or man- 

{Continued in advertising section) 




BICHMAN PICTURE CORP. 



CAMPBF.LI. STUDIO PHOTO 



Veta Searl made her screen debut in support of Creighton Hale, Linda A. Griffith and Sheldon Lewis in 
Mrs. Griffith's great photoplay, "Charity." Four feet ten inches in height, ninety- 
seven pounds in weight, and three years in pictures, is her record. 



? The Biggest Show On Earth' 5 




Mile. La Fleur 

{Enid Bennett) 

being fearless 

enjoys her 

p e rforman- 

ces with the 

lions. 



Marked 
aptitude in 
ancient lore 
is easily de~ 
v e I o p e d 
under an 
able teacher. 




ROXIE KEMP, lion-tamer, learns on 
her seventeenth birthday that by her 
dead mother's will she must leave circus 
life for school. Through her power over 
animals she rescues Marjorie Trent from 



,e eventful 
birthday 
when "Dad" 
decrees she 
must make 
good his 
promise, and 
go to school. 




a vicious dog. She meets Owen Trent. 
His people object to her. Roxie returns to 
the circus. Later, Owen's father admits 
he is Kemp's partner. They decide to 
make the"K-T" a double partnership. 



Roxie' s re- 
turn to the 
circus finds 
all the per- 
f o r m e r s 
under the 
sway of fear. 




PARAMOUNT 



With the familiar uniform the old habit of easy 
domination re-asserts itself. 



It is a pleasant surprise to learn that Owen's father 
is her father's partner. 



^^^^^^^™ 



Film Stars 9 Styles 




Barbara Castleton has chosen 

for this creation the newest 

designs in girdle, pockets 

and harem skirt. 




Louise Glaum worked out this 
device. She says it is irre- 
sistible with pale gold 
for the foundation color. 




CAMPBELL PHOTO 



TRIANOI.E-KFVSTONK 



One of the gowns worn by Katherine Harris 
Barrymore in ' ' The House of Mirth. ' ' 



There couldn't be anything pret- 
tier thanthe new sleeves shown in 
this frock worn by Evelyn Greely. 



Maud Wayne wears this wonder gown of 
painted satin, with folds of rose, and 
metallic girdle in lavender and green. 



What Kind of Movies Do Our Soldiers Like? 

By Private C. V. COMBE, No. 238, First Canadian Division 



I I I Ill INI Illlllll 



| (Editor's Note: Mr. Combe has been in the war since its earliest 

| days — as attested by his official number. Canada has sent nearly 

| 500M00 men. Following three months' service in the trenches, Mr. 

| Combe spent sixteen months in a German prison camp and thir- 

| teen months were spent on parole in Sivitzerland, and is now 

= working in the interests of the British and Canadian Recruiting 

1 Mission in the United States. He tells from first-hand knowledge 
u'hat the boys really want in movies. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIII 



T 



~^HE BIG job for big men" was not slow to lure 
Robert Warwick, actor and movie star, to 
Plattsburg first, and then to a captaincy "on 
Pershing's staff" in France. To-day he is 
there where the great guns boom and the battles surge, 
while an outraged civilization opposes the pride of its 
manhood to the senseless self-seeking of the Boche. His 
absence on democracy's business leaves a gap in the fra- 
ternity which has given unsparingly of its best to the only 
cause to-day. 

To "our boys" over there, the presence of a movie star 
is always of great interest. They see in the flesh a man 
or woman who used to move them to laughter or tears in 
other days, and they think of home and the old home folks 
who used to attend the movies with them. 

"Wish I was back in little old New York to-night, going 
to see him on the screen, with my girl at my side, ' ' said one 
sturdy, sentimental Sammy as Warwick walked by. He 
forgot for the moment that he had the movie right there in 
France. 

And this brings up the whole question of Sammy and 
his recreations on active service. Some people think that 
the soldier has his amusements right in the front line with 
him. That would be impossible. In the front line soldiers 
invariably find their time fully taken up with watching and 
tracking the unspeakable Hun. They are strictly on the 
job twenty-four hours a day. That, of course, is their 
main business there. 

But all work and no play makes Sammy a dull boy, and 
his mentors in the various recreation huts behind the line 
are watching out to see that Sammy does not get dull. 
Sammy is himself essentially a happy boy when he gets a 
chance to relax from soldiering in rest billets. His recre- 
ations are innocent and frolicsome. He can learn French 
from some sweet little mademoiselle with witching eyes. 
He can take in a vaudeville show. He can participate in 
the various military sports contests and cross-country runs, 
or, best of all, in complete relaxation he can now go to 
some good movies, like they used to have at home. 

Times were when the movies for soldiers were a joke, 
when old, worn-out films were sent for the men who risked 
their lives for civilization. But that was before Uncle 
Sam got into the business of cleaning up the world and 
keeping the cleaners cleanly amused. Now all that is 
changed. The best is thought to be none too good — in- 
deed, is reserved for France. 

What kind of movies do our soldiers like? The most 
popular pictures are those which portray war activities at 
home. The huts rock with enthusiasm when a crowd on 
Wall Street buying Liberty Bonds or a. Liberty Bond parade 




on Fifth Avenue is 
portrayed. The boys 
give a regular ovation 
at sight of work in 
shipyards and in munition 
factories. They like to 
watch films of camp train- 
ing in "The States," and 
they go wild over a pic- 
ture of the women of the 
country getting into the 
war, whether through the 
Red Cross or by other 
means. These pictures 
make good substitutes for 
letters, and they carry to 
the boys over there the 
assurance that their home 
folks are getting really into 
the war and not spending 
their time in moping and 
whining out mere puerile 
criticism. That is solid 
satisfaction to a soldier in 
action — to feel that the 
people at home identify 
themselves with his strug- 
gle and have fullest co- 
operative sympathy with him in his harrowing of the Hun. 
Sammy's nature in khaki and out is pretty much the 
same. He still has a heart hunger for home and all that 
home means. On the battlefield he dreams of it. In the 
rain and sleet he longs for the comfortable fireside and 
{Continued in advertising section) 



UNDERWOOD PHOTO 



Captain Robert Warwick 





w 



A Dog's Life 



">r> 



IN THIS photoplay Charlie Chaplin is a 
tramp. He picks up a cur as a com- 
rade. In a fruitless quest for food he 
visits a cafe, where through sheer luck 
he becomes possessed of a fat wallet. He 
invites a cabaret girl to dine. While they 
are talking, two ruffians stun Chaplin with 
a club and rob him of the wallet. Hard 
pressed by the police, they bury the purse 
in the alley. Chaplin later comes here to 
sleep, and the pup digs up the wallet. To- 
gether they proceed to vanquish the villains 
and reclaim the heroine. In the end Chap- 
lin marries the singer, they buy a farm and 
retire to the simple life. 





FIRST NATIONAL-CHAPLIN 



They Are Hunting for Money 

Can Find It 





Gus Pixley , a 
hungry tramp, de- 
termines to outwit 
the law by a sur- 
prise visit as "The 
Bogus Uncle. ' ' 
After he gets by 
the law and is in 
a fair way to an- 
nex the profits the 
real uncle arrives, 
but having satisfied 
hunger other trou- 
bles are easy to 
manage. 



F"MVE hundred dollars 
will be paid for 
criticisms of 
Moon Comedies. 
For each of the five best 
and most skillfully con- 
structed criticisms of 
Moon Comedies, produced 
by Sunshine Film, Inc., $100.00 will 
be paid. 

Criticisms may be based on screen 
performance or published stories, and 
censure as well as praise is permis- 
sible. Contestant must state his full 
name and home address. 

As plays are released, stories of 
the plots will be published 
in Film Fun and in 
pamphlet form for free 
distribution. 





The contest closes 
October 1st, at 1 2 o'clock 
noon, by which time 
criticisms must be at the 
company's office, 126-130 
West Forty -sixth Street, 
New York City, N. Y. 
Payment will be made 
on October 15th. The judges who will 
make the award have no connection 
with Moon Comedies or with Film 
Fun. They are Mr. N. Binham, 22 
North William Street, New York City; 
Mr. S. Wald, 2653 Decatur Street, 
New York City; and Mr. H. Jenssen, 
37a Cooper Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
All criticisms received will be care- 
fully read and fairly judged. 

A new comedy will be released 
each week. 



KIR 



In "No Money, No 
Fun' ' the hero suf- 
fers an ailment 
he calls "money 
shortage ." He 
seeks the cure that 
never before has 
failed, but guard- 
ian says, "Come 
here and live; get 
busy and earn 
what you need. ' ' 
Whereupon Wil- 
lie sees a great 
light. 




SUNSHINE FILM, INC. 



By opening a boarding-house at prices which attract 

crowds, he amasses much money but no fun, 

for late arrivals create a riot. 



Among the complications is this of the reverend gentle- 
man in the wrong room, as annoyed about it 
as the actress who has lost her lines. 





Troth to 



>6ufBoy in (Snip 

GonoralQi^sonSaysJfo^Qoh that oVoru 
Soldier mio Cfoos tpthoJront ShouldJaAo 
•> S^t^atod Irotu s 



Dr. James Francis SullWan Explains Why It Helps 
to Increase Strength and Endurance and Build 
Up Weak, Nervous, Run-down Folks. 

What every soldier most needs is tremendous 
"stay there" strength, power and endurance, with 
nerves of steel and blood of iron. To help produce 
this result there is nothing in my experience which 
I have found so valuable as organic iron— Nuxated 
Iron, says Dr. James Francis Sullivan, formerly 
Physician of Bellevue Hospital (Outdoor Dept.), 
New York, and the Westchester County Hospital. 
"I have personally found it of such great value 
as a tonic, strength and blood builder that I 
believe if General Gibson's advice were followed 
many of our fighting men would find it of great 
benefit. In my opinion there is nothing better 
than organic iron —Nuxated Iron — for enriching- 
the blood and helping increase strength, energy 
and endurance. 

General Horatio Gates Gibson says Nuxated Iron 
has brought back to him in good measure that old 
buoyancy and energy that filled his veins in 1847 
when he made his triumphant entry with General 
Scott into the City of Mexico and he feels that 
every soldier should take Nuxated Iron. 

Another remarkable case is that of General David 
Stuart Gordon, noted Indian fighter and hero 
of the battle of Gettysburg. General Gordon says: 
"When I became badly run-down this year, I found 
myself totally without the physical power to 'come 
back' as I had done in my younger days. I tried 
different so-called 'tonics,' without feeling any 
better, but finally I heard of how physicians were 
widely recommending organic iron to renew red 
blood and rebuild strength in worn-out bodies. 
As a result I started taking Nuxated Iron and with- 
in a month it had roused my weakened vital forces 
and made me feel strong again, giving me endurance 
such as I never hoped to again possess." 

Another interesting case is that of General John 
Lincoln Clem, who at the early age of 12 years was 




Sergeant in the U. S. 
Army and the last 
veteran of the Civil 
War to remain on 
the U.S. Army active 
list. General Clem 
says: "I find in Nux- 
ated Iron the one 
and ever-reliable 
tonic. Two months 
after beginning the 
treatment I am a 
well man." 

And then there is 
Judge Samuel S. 
Yoder, Statesman, 
Jurist and for 18 
years a practicing 
physician — formerly 
Surgeon Major in the 
Army and now Com- 
mander in Chief of 
the Union Veteran 
Union, who says: 
"Nuxated Iron re- 
stores, revivifies and 
rehabilitates the 
system. To the man 
of 70 as I am it is just 
as certain, just as 
efficacious as to the 
youth in his teens." 

It is surprising how 
many people suffer 
deficiency and do 
not know it. If you 
are not strong or 
well you owe it to 

yourself to make the following test: See how long 
you can work or how far you can walk without be- 
coming tired. Next take two five-grain tablets of 
Nuxated Iron three times per day after meals^for 
two weeks. Then test your strength again and 
see how much you have gained. 

Manufacturers' Note: Nuxated Iron which is prescribed 
by Dr. Sullivan, and which has been used by Generals Gibson, 
Gordon, Clem, Judge Yoder and others with such surprising 
results, is not a secret remedy, but one which is well known to 



This it Dr. Sullivan's pre' 
scription for enriching the 
blood and helping to make 
strong, keen red-blooded 
Americans — men and 
women who dare and do. 



druggists everywhere. Unlike the older inorganic iron products 
it is easily assimilated, does not injure the teeth, make them 
black, nor upset the stomach. The manufacturers guarantee 
successful and entirely satisfactory results to every purchaser or 
they will refund your money. It is dispensed by all good. drug- 
gists and general stores. 




The 



a 



Letters of a Self-Made Failure 



99 



ran serially for ten weeks in Leslie's and were quoted by more than 200 
publications. If you sit in "the driver's seat," or merely plod along be- 
side the wagon, whether you are a success or think yourself a failure, 
you will find this book full of hope, help and the right kind of inspiration. 

If you believe that it is more important to know why ten thousand fail 
rather than why one man succeeds, read this book. The Letters are 
written in epigrammatic style with a touch of irresistible humor, and 
they impart a system of quaint philosophy that will appeal to everyone 
regardless of age, sex or station. Price, $1.00. 

Leslie-Judge Company 

225 Fifth Avenue Dept. F-7 New York City 



JK 



HEADACHE 
TABLETS 

27 Years the Enemy of Pain 

Br Headaches, 
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La Grippes Golds 
Women's /Idles w Ills, 
Rheumatics SriatkMis 

fhkKarPrus&stlbrAfllaMets 



10 




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See Monogram ff^pn the Genuine 

The Antikamnia Chemical Co . St. Louis 



IIIIIII1IHIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIII 



nmiiiiiiiiiiiiin 



'T'HIS picture, 
in full colors, 
9 x 12, mounted 
on a heavy mat, 
ready for the 
frame, will be 
sent postpaid for 



25c 



Judge Art Print 
Department 

225 Fifth Avenue 
New York City 




A JILL FOR JACK j 
James Montgomery Flagg 



llllffll miuiimiin ' n lilHlMllillli: I millllin i.rui: r,r mm ii 



DEFENCE CHECK PROTECTOR 

There is only one protector that really protects and that is 

McNeill check protector 

I will ship one of these to anyone on 10 Days' Free Trial 

Yon just simply mail me a money order for $8.90. To insure <?ood 
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mail me the remaining $4.50 and the machine is yours; if you are 
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express charges, will promptly be refunded. Send order today, 
you can't lose, to 

ruble McNeill, boaz, Kentucky 



MILITARY AIRSHIP 

AND PARACHUTE 

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Can drop * bombs." Will fly for 

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over and over again. Great chance for boys 

, t° study aerial warfare. Justorder 12 packagesof Bingo per 

' fumed ironing wax, eell at 10c a pkg. No trouble to sell, 

Return money and this wonderful airship \& yoors. . Send today 

We trust you. Boys, i f you want real eoort Fend for this airship. 

BINGO CO., DEPT. 440 BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 




FREE 

WRITERS 



A wonderful little Book of money- 
making hints, suggestions, ideas; 
the A B C of successful Story and 
Movie-Play writing. Absolutely 
Free. Just address Writer's 
Service, Dept. as. Auburn.N.Y, 



Practice Makes Perfect 

By Michael Gross 

AT THE movies Larry Loudvoice could be found most any day; 
As a pest he had no equal, folks that sat near by would say. 
For he thought it was his duty to play teacher to the crowd, 
And he'd read each movie title in a voice both harsh and loud. 
Years went by, still Larry labored; every title he would bawl. 
Practice took him into Congress, where he out-talks one and all. 

Ezra Knowall was a wizard. He could guess in half a reel 
What would happen at the finish; every plot he could reveal. 
In a voice that needed filing he would tell folks, far and near, 
Just the way the wicked villain would wind up his brief career. 
Ten years passed, and little Ezra, through his practice on the screen, 
Made the finest weather prophet that the country's ever seen. 

Sammy Bighoof was a terror; had the others beat a mile. 
He would straddle in an end seat, with his feet stuck in the aisle. 
Every time a picture ended and somebody would walk down, 
Sammy's feet would start a tangle and there'd be a broken crown. 
But now Sammy's joined the circus, and he's billed on every street 
As the only living mortal with two educated feet. 

Hortense Sournote was another species of a movie pest; 

When the music started playing, Hortense couldn't seem to rest. 

He would hum, and he would whistle, stamp his feet and shake his hair; 

Seemed you couldn't keep him quiet if you nailed him to the chair. 

Every one of us who watched him wondered in what cell he'd land, 

But to-day Hortense's the leader of a jazz-jazz ragtime band. 

How Considerate! 

In Greenville children are admitted on half price to the matinee performance at 
the motion picture theaters. While waiting to purchase his ticket, a small boy was 
having quite an argument with the girl in the box. 

"When I goes into a movie house, I pays the same price as grown-ups. My 
favorite actor is Mary Pickford, and if I pays five cents instead of ten cents, she will 
get that much less in her wage6. " 

The Merry-go-round 

First writer — What's Scribbler so busy for these days? I never see his stuff. 

Second writer — No, Scribbler hasn't time to turn out any movies. He's keeping 
an up-to-date card index of the changes which occur in the scenario departments of 
the film corporations which are in the market for the kinds of scenarios which Scrib- 
bler could write if he didn't have to keep his index up to date! 

Jerky Jingles 

Mary Miles Minter, Gee, Whizz ! Helps Huyler's chocolate biz ! She eats 'em, 
(we've seen). During meals, and between! No wonder she's sweet as she is! 

We are tickled clear down to our shoes. When her comedy leads we peruse ! A 
few words does she take. Shakes 'em up, and they make, Our blues lose their 
hues, — does Miss Loos! 

If every book, when we buyed it, Had a Storey like Edith inside it. We would 
read all the day, 'Till our glims gave away, And never be sorry we tried it! 

Doug Fairbanks, whose ways are so winning, Won't go to church — is it sinning? 
"The reason," says Doug, "Is, the smile on my mug, Starts the whole congregation 
a-grinning!" —Harry J. Smalley. 

To Accommodate the Fans 

First postal clerk — Uncle Sam is going to need a new tranpsort service one of these 
days. 

Second p. c. — Why? 

First p. c. — To transport the mail addressed to the movie stars who have enlisted ! 

Money Talks 

Millie — Many actresses get more money posing for the movies than they ever did 
for acting on the stage! 

Tillie — Which proves that "silence is golden." —Harold Seton. 




"WALL-NUTS" "GOOD-NIGHT, NURSE - ' 

By James Montgomery Flagg 




Here's a 
Suggestion 

Can you think of a 
better decoration 
than these five jolly 
girls from Judge? 

Five brilliant paint- 
ings by 

James Montgomery Flagg 
Mary Lane McMillan 
Paul Stahr 

in full colors, 9 x 12 
inches, mounted on a 
heavy mat, ready for 
the frame, for 

One Dollar 

(25 cents apiece) 

Just pin a bill, check, 
money-order or stamps to 
the coupon below, fill in 
your name, and send it in 
to-day to the Art Print 
Department of 




% *^s? 



The Happy Medium 

illllllimitiliiiiiiiiiiliiiimMiiiiimiiimiuiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiilliiitiiiiimiiiiiiiiii iiMiimiiimiimii iimiiuiiiinliliii 

F. F, / 

JUDGE ART PRINT DEPARTMENT 
225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 
Please send me the five pictures from Judge, 
for which I enclose $1.00. 

Name 

Address 





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How " Innocent " Was 
Filmed 

(.Continued from a previous page) 

ner, " was the enigmatical reply. "A 
show of feeling is not dignified." 

Finally I said: "Could I smile a 
little?" 

"Yes," he replied. 

"Could I cry?" 

"Oh, yes!" 

"Then," I announced, "I'll smile at 
you with tears in my eyes. Perhaps 
that will show in an Oriental way some 
part of the emotion I should like to 
show if I were playing an Occidental 
woman." 

And so we played the scene, although 
I am sure he felt that such an "ex- 
treme" display of emotion was quite 
disgraceful on the part of any well- 
brought-up Japanese girl. 

There is one thing, however, which 
they are not called upon to suppress — 
their vanity. They are very fond of 
pretty things. They love to make up 
their faces, and they take extraordinary 
pride in their hair, hands and feet. 




i^-AA^ 



What Kind of Movies Do 
Our Soldiers Like? 

(Continued from a previous page) 
the tender ministrations of mother, 
wife or sweetheart. He hears the romp- 
ing play of children and would gladly 
join them. The film which portrays 
these things back there in billets in 
France appeals the most strongly. It 
makes our fighting men conjure up the 
picture of their own happiness before 
the menace of the Hun overshadowed 
their loved, defenseless ones and called 
them forth to fight America's battles 
on the fields of France and Flanders. 
As never before they know what home 
means — they who are offering, proudly 
offering their all to make it secure for 
their own folk. Sammy knows, as he 
sits and watches these home scenes, 
these touching, simple home pictures 
enacted before him, that he is defend- 
ing the homes of his country from the 
terrible fate that has overtaken those 
of France and Belgium, of Serbia and 
Armenia. 

Then, again, there is something uni- 
versal in the love for the antics of 



happy, healthy children, in the grate- 
ful benediction which all cast on the 
sweet love-making of a lad and a lassie 
in a shady dell, in the great satisfac- 
tion with which one regards home life 
simply lived. After Sammy has seen 
this, his yearnings are purified, and he 
returns to the grim drama of war with 
a loftier courage, with a higher deter- 
mination that the homes of his own 
country shall be inviolate while his life 
shall last. 

All the popular, clean fun-makers of 
filmdom are favorites. The men like 
to sit back among their comrades and 
cronies and watch the antics. Nor are 
the men ashamed to abandon them- 
selves to the hilarity of the hour. 
They enjoy every effort made for their 
amusement. 

It is a surprise to know that the 
American khaki-clad youth likes to see 
films that are usually regarded as an- 
cient history. Something with a back- 
ground in the Spanish-American War, 
in the Philippine struggle, in troubles 
in the Mexican border, in any theater 
of the war on land or sea except France, 
is bound to be received with avidity. 
He bars happenings in France and 
Flanders. He thinks, and rightly, that 
no film-maker can give him informa- 
tion on life there. The old-time and, 
as some erroneously think, threadbare 
cowboy films are favorites also. 



Film Fun 

Magazine of Fun, Judge's Library and 
Sis Hopkins' Own Book Combined. 



iiiiiiiiiiHiiiiniiiii 



;in i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



No. 351— JULY, 1918 



Single Copies, 10 Cents 
Subscription by the Year, SI. 00 



iiiiiiiiiniiiiimiiii 



Published monthly by 

LESLIE-JUDGE COMPANY, PUBLISHERS 
• NEW YORK CITY. 

John A. Sleicher, President. 

Reuben P. Sleicher, Secretary. 
f A. E. Rollauer, Treasurer. 

Grant Hamilton, Art Director. 
Jessie Niles Burness, Editor. 

225 Fifth Avenue, New York. 

umilli i ii linn i> >i> 'I' iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiiiniii umiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiimiii 1 

,* Copyright, 1918, by Leslie-Judge Company, f 
Publishers. 

Title registered as a trade-mark. 

Entered at the post-office at New York as 

second-class matter. 



Advertising Offices: 
225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 
Marquette Building, Chicago, 111. 
Walker Building, Boston, Mass. 
Henry Building, Seattle, Wash. 

FILM FUN is printed by The Williams Printing 
Company. 




"The Curse of Drink" 

EVEN the most ex- 
emplary of men 
has some youthful 
misdeed to look back 
upon. This amusing 
picture may have been 
you, back in the dim and 
wicked past. 

It has proved one of 
Judge's most popular 
subjects and has been re- 
printed, in full colors, 
mounted on a heavy mat, 
11 x 14, ready for the 
frame. It will be mailed 
post free for twenty-five 
cents, stamps. 

Judge Art Print 
Department 

225 Fifth Ave. New York City 

Or with the attached coupon 

Judge Art Print Dept. 

225 Fifth Ave. New York City 

Enclosed find $ for which 

please send me ■ • • -copies of "The 
Curse of Drink," as advertised. 

P. P.— 7-18 

Name 

Address 

mni! 



Who's Who and Where 

Merl La Voy, war camera corre- 
spondent, is leaving early in June for 
his third tour of European battlefronts, 
this time in company with Burton 
Holmes, lecturer. His marching out- 
fit, including camera and equipment, 
weighs about 150 pounds, but past ex- 
periences will enable him to get all he 
goes after, he believes. 
-?- 
Arthur Ellis, a private in the old 
Sixty-ninth, but hitherto of the movie 
staff of C. L. Chester, Inc., writes that 
he is recovering from ' ' a lucky wound. ' ' 
The censored letters are vague as to 
the injury, but very explicit about the 
beauty of southern France, where he 
was sent to recuperate, the goodness of 
the French people and the glorious 
privilege of serving with our army 
there. 

-?- 
Captain Robert Warwick made a hur- 
ried trip from " somewhere in France" 
to New York and Washington, D. C, 
on a special mission for General Persh- 
ing, to whose personal staff he is at- 
tached. His stay was short and his 
return hurried, but he contrived to lend 
an able hand in aid of the Red Cross 
drive in May, making several speeches 
that told of things as they actually are, 
concerning which we are all anxious. 
-5- 
Donald Thompson, Leslie's special 
camera correspondent, whose Russian 
war films, shown in picture theaters 
throughout the country, have aided 
greatly in arousing vigorous resistance 
to the Hun, left in the latter part of 
May for his third expedition to the 
battlefront. He will make a record of 
the situation in Siberia, and the stories 
should reach the home office in time 
for publication beginning early in 
September. 

-?- 
Mrs. Elizabeth Sears, formerly edi- 
tor of Film Fun and for the past year 
publicity director for the American 
Film Company of Chicago, sailed for 
France on June 1st. She will spend 
three months in the war zone, as repre- 
sentative of To-day's Housewife, gath- 
ering material for a series of articles . 
for that magazine as well as for a num- 
ber of others. Her "Wartime Jour- 
nal," which has appeared recently in 
Today's- Housewife, was written as a 
help to women in readjusting their 
lives to the exigencies of war. 




Trf/s /s mykS/vjy 2)ay 



The Boys' Magazine 

azine At a Big Discount! 

In order to introduce THE 
BOYS' MAGAZINE to thou- 
ianda of new readers, we will 
send this superb magazine 

A Whole Year for 
Only 60 Cents 

^Regular yearly subscription 

price $1.00— Newsstand 

price Si. 20. ) 

In addition to quoting this special low price we will give to 
each new subscriber a copy of our book "Fifty Wavs for 
Boys to Earn Money," The valuable money making ideas 
contained in this book are worth a great deal to every live 
ambitious boy. 

Get this splendid magazine for your boy or for some boy 
in whom you take a special interest. 

THE BOYS' MAGAZINE is one of a very few periodicals 
that has not increased its subscription price. Besides not 
increasing our regular price of SI. 00, we are giving you an 
opportunity of subscribing for a whole year for only 60c and at 
the same time are giving you a really excellent premium in 
the book described above. 

THE BOYS' MAGAZINE is chock-full of just the kind of 
reading you want your boy to have. Clean, inspiring 
stories by the best boys' authors. Beautifully illustrated 
throughout both in black and white and in colors. Practical 
and instructive departments devoted to Electricity, Mechan- 
ics, Athletics and Physical Training, Hunting, Trapping 
Camping and Fishing, Photography, Drawing, Stamp and 
Coin Collecting, Poultry and Pets, Boys' Societies and Clubs, 
Joe Jolly's Joke Market, Cash Contests, etc., etc. 

Send in your order today at this special 
price and make a certain boy migrhty happy 
for a whole year. 

We will refund your money immediately if you are not 
more than pleased with the magazine and the book. (Remit 
in stamps if more convenient.) 

This offer is open to new subscribers only, 
THE SCOTT F. 
2069 Main St. 



Address, 
REDFIELD CO. 

Smethport, Pa. 



See 

Leslie's 

Illustrated Weekly Newspaper 

Esiohlisked in »8^5 

for the Best War 
Pictures First 

For sale on all news-stands 
Ten Cents Every Week 




You Can Have 
r Beautiful Eye- 
^ brows and Lashes 



by applying **I«asli-Bi'on--ine''niglitly 
It nourishes the eyebrows and lashes, 
making them long, thick and luxuri- 
ant, adding wonderfully to your beauty, 
charm and attractiveness. *'Lash-Brow- 
ine'* is a guaranteed pure and harmless 
preparation, used successfully by thousands. 
Send 50c and we will mail you "Lash-Brow-ine" 
ind ourMaybell beauty booklet prepaid in plain 
cover. Sntisfaetion Assured or Money Refunded. 
MAYBKLT, LABORATORIES, 4305-27 Grand Blvd.. Chicago 




^POPULARITY FOLLOWS THE? 

If you rJay Quaint, dreamy Hawaiian 
music or latest songs on the Ukulele you 
will be wanted everywhere. We 
teach by mail 20 simple lessons 
give you free a genuine Hawaiian 
Ukulele, music, everything — no 
extras. Auk ua lo send the story of 
Hawaiian music. You will love it, 
No obligation— absolutely free, 
The Hawaiian institute oi Music 
1402H Rroadwny NewYorh.N.Y. 




$— Old Coins Wanted— $ 

$4.25 EACH paid for U. S. Flying Eagle Cents dated 1856. 
$2 to $500 EACH paid lor hundreds of Coins dated before 1910. 
Send TEN cents at once for our New Illustrated Coin Value 
Book, size 4x7. It may mean your fortune. Get posted. 
CLARKE COIN CO., Box 26. LE ROY, N. Y. 



ii'iiin 1'iiiimiimum 



| OUR READERS' COLUMN [ 

1 This depaiment belongs to the readers I 

i of Film Kun. Write us and tell us what § 

1 you think about it. If we can help you, | 

| write and tell us so. If you like our maga- 1 

1 zine, tell us about it. If you do not like | 

I it, tell us anyway. We want to know | 

1 just what you think about it. 

£. S , Tampa. Fla.— Carol Hollo- 
way's address is 1708 Talmadge Street, 
Hollywood. It has not been possible 
to reply to your question until now. 

H. C. C, Ottawa, Ont.— Broncho 
Billie films are being re-issued by Es- 
sanay. You will have opportunity to 
see them soon. 

L. M. C, Spokane, Wash. — Scena- 
rios are in demand, but most producing 
concerns have able writers in charge of 
that department. You could make in- 
quiry of them. 

B. H., Elkin, N. C— Alice Lake and 
Jack Mulhall can be reached at Uni- 
versal City, Cal. Shirley Mason's 
home address is 3053 Perry Avenue, 
New York City. Betty Schade's we 
do not know. 

D. B. C, Norwich, Conn. — Lou Tel- 
ligen played this past season in "Blind 
Youth," which had a long run at the 
Republic Theater, in New York. Your 
age would make it difficult for you to 
get into pictures now, because they 
would think you might be drafted any 
time. 

D. R. M., Altoona, Pa.— At present 
about a million and a half feet of film 
is sent abroad for the little theaters 
behind the lines. Camp activities 
here in America make popular films. 
"Pershing's Crusaders," showing what 
our boys are doing over there, has just 
been released. 

C. R., Hamilton, Ont. — Jack Pick- 
ford has gone to war. His home ad- 
dress is 5284 Selma Avenue, Holly- 
wood, Cal. Olive Thomas, his wife, 
is there, we believe, filling her Trian- 
gle contract. Margery Wilson's ad- 
dress is 4619J Melbourne Avenue, 
Hollywood. We cannot answer your 
question about Paul Willis. 

The Khaki-clad Boys, Camp Zachary 
Taylor, Ky. — That "jokey Irish wom- 
an" who used to write the stories you 
ask about is now editing the Naval Re- 
serve for the boys at Cape May. We 
will ask him to send you a copy. He 
is still joking. We hope to grow, but 
that might mean a higher price, and 
we are proud of being the ten-cent 
magazine. 

M. S. B., Niagara, Wis. — It is ex- 
ceedingly difficult to get into pictures, 
because many changes are being made 
in producing companies, fewer and bet- 
ter pictures are being made, and many 
old actors are out. Pearl White is 
still playing. A letter addressed to her 
in care of Pathe, 25 West Forty-fourth 
Street, New York City, will reach her 
promptly. 



DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME 



Tear Out— Fill In— Hand Letter-Carrier— or Mail to Post Office 

TO THE LOCAL POSTMASTER: -Kindly have letter-carrier deliver 
to me on for which I will pay on delivery: 

(Date) J 

_$5. U. S. WAR-SAVINGS STAMPS at $ each 



(Siate number wanted) 



(State Dumber w&£ted> 

Name 



...25c. U. S. THRIFT STAMPS at 25c. each. 



(See prices below) 



WS.S. 

WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

ISSUED BY THE 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 





Film Fun 


W. S. S. COST DURING 1918 
July $4.18 1 Sept. $4.20 1 Nov. 
Aug. 4.19 1 Oct. 4.21 | Dec. 
W. S. S. WORTH $5.00 JANUARY 1. 


$4.22 
4.23 
1923 



iiiKtiiiAimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiimiiimiiii 



M mi nun i i ii mini ii i Mill i inn u minim u mm Ill 




This amusing picture in full 
colors, 9 x 12, mounted on a 
heavy mat, ready for the frame, 
will be sent postpaid for 
twenty-five cents. 

Judge Art Print Department 



225 Fifth Avenue 



New York City 



'War Babies 



iimmiiiiiiNiiiiiii 



■ ■ is in i iimmii r.iiiiimiiiiimiiiimiiii 



liiiniiiii i iiimimnmiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiii n 



Will You Help Us 
Get to "Sea Breeze? 

With the hot sun beating 
down on their frail underfed 
bodies — with no hope of re- 
lief in sight — the little chil- 
dren and tired mothers of the 

slums are facing another grim summer in their 

empty lives. 

Help Us Give These Unfortunates a Chance for Health 

Sea Breeze — the Association's fresh air home — gives the one 
chance for rest, nourishment and care for many of these fam- 
ilies each year — but help is needed at once if 
we are to provide for the long waiting list. 




Will you give — just a little? Allow 60 cents a day or 
$4.00 a week for each one whom you will send as your 
guest. 

The New York Association for Improving 
the Condition of the Poor 



Room 250 



105 East 22d Street 



New York 




George 
Blagden, 

f A. I. C. P.. 

f' 10SE.22dSt. 
New York 

_, ''Enclosed is$ 

' with which you are 

t give fresh air relief 

: most needy cases. 



N>l 


Br 

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J9L* k \ 

Br- Aw r '4 

In W ^M 


b.. JHeT**- V M 


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' ■■ ■'■■ 



Spies and Lies 

German agents are everywhere, eager to gather scraps of news about our men, our ships, our munitions. 
It is still possible to get such information through to Germany, where thousands of these fragments — often 
individually harmless — are patiently pieced together into a whole which spells death to American soldiers and 
danger to American homes. 

But while the enemy is most industrious in trying to collect information, and his systems elaborate, he is 
not superhuman — indeed he is often very stupid, and would fail to get what he wants were it not deliberately 
handed to him by the carelessness of loyal Americans. 



Do not discuss in public, or with strangers, any news of 
troop and transport movements, of bits of gossip as to our 
military preparations, which come into your possession. 

Do not permit your friends in service to tell you — or 
write you — "inside" facts about where they are, what they are 
doing and seeing, 

Do not become a tool of the Hun by passing on the mali- 
cious, disheartening rumors which he so eagerly sows. Remem- 
ber he asks no better service than to have you spread his lies of 
disasters to our soldiers and sailors, gross scandals in the Red 
Cross, cruelties, neglect and wholesale executions in our camps, 
drunkenness ar.d vice in the Expeditionary Force, and other 
tales certain to disturb American patriots and to bring anxiety 
and grief to American parents. 



And do not wait until you catch someone putting a bomb 
under a factory. Report the man who spreads pessimistic 
stories, divulges — or seeks — confidential military information, 
cries for peace, or belittles our efforts to win the war. 

Send the names of such persons, even if they are in uni- 
form, to the Department of Justice, Washington. Give all the 
details you can, with names of witnesses if possible — show the 
Hun that we can beat him at his own game of collecting 
scattered information and putting it to work. The fact that 
you made the report will not become public. 

You are in contact with the enemy today, just as truly as 
if you faced him across No Man's Land. In your hands are 
two powerful weapons with which to meet him — discretion 
and vigilance. Use them. 



COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC INFORMATION 



8 JACKSON PLACE, WASHINGTON, D C. 



Contributed through Division of Advertising 




George Creel. Chairman 
The Secretary of fit ate 
The Secretary of War 
The Secretary of the Navy 



United States Gov't Comm. on Public Information 



This space contributed for the Winning of the War by 
THE PUBLISHER OF FILM FUN 



Value of the Swoboda Idea to You 



llllllllllll!lllllll!!N!IIIIIIDIIIIIIII!llillllll!!!llllli!!!IIIIIIN Willi . 



THE Swoboda Idea means 
to rely for every power and 
for every success and for 
every advantage upon self. 

The Swoboda Idea means 
self-advancement, self-reliance, 
self-sufficiency, self-curing, self- 
power, self-evolution and self- 
advancement in creation. 

The Swoboda Idea means 
thorough and self-determination 
to win. 

The Swoboda Idea means to 
succeed and to win at all costs 
in terms of energy, in spite of 
all adverse conditions and in 
spite of all obstacles. 

The Swoboda Idea is oppo- 
site to the theory of charity. 
Conscious Evolution — the Swo- 
boda Science — means success 
without assistance, without char- 
ity of the environment. It means 
success because of the power of 
success — because of the power 
to command success — because 
of the power in abundance to 
create success — and because of 
the super - power essential to 
compel success. 

The Swoboda Idea has great po- 
tential oowers and possibilities for 
you. You are 
living an infe- 
rior life if you 
are not capital- 
izing and using 
the Swoboda 
Idea. 

The Swoboda 
Idea holds unusual 
health, unusual en- 
ergy and unusual 
power in store for 
you. With the Swo- 
boda energy and 
power, you will be- 
come more positive, 
you will fear condi- 
tions less, you will 
convert your liabil- 
ities into assets, your 
dreariness into 
pleasure, your infe- 
rior life into full life, 
your feeble life into 
the abundant life. 




You cannot afford to deny 
yourself the benefit of the 
Swoboda Idea. 

The Swoboda Idea is to 

capitalize, increase and de- 
velop your own powers. 

The Swoboda Idea is to be 
rich in energy, rich in health, 
rich in vitality, rich in every 
power. 

The Swoboda Idea is to 

have Freedom from every 
weakness and distress and 
freedom from failure. 

The Swoboda Idea is to 

have liberty to live the supe- 
rior life, the better life, the 
abundant life, the successful 
life. 

Evolution has brought the entire human race and you this 
far. The Swoboda Idea is to advance you further, through 
your own employment of evolutionary energy. 

The Swoboda Idea is that the struggle for existence is 
personal and eternal. 

You live because you compel the universe to tolerate you. 

The Swoboda Idea means that the universe is your 
competitor and enemy in terms of energy, and that you suc- 
ceed only as you require the power to whip the universe and 
to mold your department of the universe for your advantage. 

The Swoboda Idea is to be super-prepared, through 
self-evolution. 

The Swoboda Idea is to create for each individual 
eternal freedom and liberty — the freedom 
and liberty of self - power 
and self -evolution. 



ot conscio,, s What Others Have to Say: 

"The result of Conscious Evolution seems to 
me almost miraculous. I am really beginning 
to live, not simply exist.*' AGE 65 YRS. 

"I am so well pleased with Conscious Evo- 
lution, and the results it has given me are 
greater than I ever dreamed possible." 

"Conscious Evolution has made me feel like 
a new man. That awful tiredness has left 
me." 

"Conscious Evolution has worked wonders 
with me." 

"1 feel sprightlier, and more willing to go 
ahead with unpleasant lasks. I feel a certain 
added strength. It seems great to me." 

"T am very thankful that the Lord directed 
me tu Conscious Evolution." 

"Conscious Evolution surely develops will 
power. It is just what I needed; in fact, 
should have had long ago." 

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human being through Conscious Evolution." 
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I VIRTUE IN THE BALLET I 




Of all the witches and semi-witches ot that eternal Wa 1 - 
purgis Night that represents the world, the ladies of the ballet, 
have at all times and in all places been regarded as least like 
saints. 

Whenever a new, youthful dancer appeared at the Paris 
Opera House the habitues vied with each other in showering 
her with attentions and in overwhelming her with a veritable 
broadside of Cupid's artillery. 

For how could these young and pretty girls with every 
right to life, love and pleasure, and subsisting on a very small 
salary, resist the seduction of the smell of flowers and of the 
glitter of jewels ? 

She had the voluptuous form of a Greek Helen and she 
took the old guard of the Opera House by storm. The very next 
morning a perfect shower of billets-doux, jewels, and bouquets 
fell into the poor dancer's modest apartment. 

He was a rich stockbroker, one of those generous gen- 
tlemen," if the object of his momentary fancy was young and 
pretty and apparently unsophisticated. And then there was 
another, who sent no diamonds, and not even flowers, but who 
was young and goodlooking, though poor, and who worshipped 
her from afar until that memorable night — but read the whole 
story for yourself as Maupassant tells it — an amusing story that 
is a gem of art and irony, a story with an unexpected ending 
that will do your heart good, and found with all Maupassant's 
other inimitable stories, his novels, his poems and dramas, in 
this superb VERDUN EDITION of 



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OF 



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UNABRIDGED AND UNEXPURGATED 

Maupassant does not moralize. In the wonderful pictures he gives of the 
world he lived in virtue is praised and vice is condemned rather by events 
and action. If he is terribly real, and the nudity of his human nature is 
startling in its effect, it is because his stories mirror life as he found it. 

A SPECIALLY LOW BEFORE - PUBLICATION PRICE 

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The petty meannesses of human nature 
and the passions — lust and cupidity — which 
stir most men and women to action did not 
stay Maupassant's impartial hand so long 
as this ugly side of humanity existed. 
Pitiless as is his art, at times he surprises 
us with a touch of tender pathos in which 
we recognize the warm heart of a fellowman. 

GREATEST OF STORY 
WRITERS 

As the supreme master in what is one 
of the most difficult forms of art — the short 
story — Maupassant's fame has extended 
into all civilized lands. Tolstoy marveled 
at the depth of human interest he found in 
his stories; Andrew Lang declared he found 
in him "the tenderness of Fielding, the 
graphic power of Smollett, the biting satire 
of Dean Swift, mingled and reincarnated 
in Gallic guise;" and Henry James hailed 
him as " a man of genius who had achieved 
the miracle of a fresh tone." 



g Address 

S Occupation State 

ailllllllllllllllllllllllllllAIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIU 



©CI.B416178 
JUL II 1918 




THE DREAM— AFTER THE MOVIES 



Film Fun 

225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

An Independent Illustrated Monthly Magazine 
Devoted to the Best Interests of All 
Motion Picture Art and Artists 

AUGUST-- 1918 



o 



u 



n 



s 



ILLUSTRATED FEATURES: 

"Reel Lovers " 

"Summer is Trying on the Com 

plexion " 
The Motion Picture Press Agent 

in Wartime 
"The Lonesome Girl" 
Wliat Douglas Fairbanks Missed 
SwattheFly: An "Educational" Film 
Before They Cut Her Off 

Illustrated by W. E. Hill 
If " Cleopatsy " Interferes With 

History, Give Up History 
"Daily Talks With Shakespeare" 
The Beanfugles at the Movies 
"More Trouble " 
Perils to Provoke Our Smiles 
"Two Tough Tenderfeet " 
Registered Emotions of the Screen 
A Crimson Episode 



James Montgomery Flagg 

Virginia Lee Corbin 

Pat Dowling, U. S. N. 
James Montgomery Flagg 



A. H. F. 



Arthur Chapman 
Frank Keenan 
Mrs. D. W. Griffith 
Mack Sennett 

Charlotte Mish 



EDITORIALS: 

Elevate the Screen Picture 
Vogue of the Motion Pici ure 
Not "Taps," but "Reveille" 

COMMENTS OF A FREE LANCE: 

Some Nuisances of the Movies Linda A. Griffith 

De Mille and "The Whispering 

Chorus" ( 

A Rising Star 

The Genius of Charlie Chaplin 
"Hearts of the World " 
California's First Theater 

MISCELLANEOUS: 

Flashbacks, The Neiv Movie Theater at Yapp's Crossing, Wliat 
David and Goliath Missed, Movies From Film Fun's Screen, 
The Power of Illustration, Short Scenarios, Dialogues Never 
Heard at the Movies, At Niagara Falls. 



a 



year 



Number 352 



10c a copy 




DRAWN BY JAMES MONTGOMERY FLAd 



REEL LOVERS 



Flash Backs 

Some News Nuggets and Critical Quips 



EVERY "extra" thinks Genius climbs the steep stairs 
to success, while Luck goes up in the elevator. 
A scenario writer killed himself because his 
plays were not accepted. Ah, if only some — 
(You finish it!) 

A strong five-reeler depicting the ravages of rum will 
make more converts than six felly Sundays. 

Eileen Percy denies she has married Otto Busch, An- 
hauser Busch or any other Busch. There's still a chance, 
fellows. 

Joy Note : Marguerite Clark is to play both Topsy and 
Little Eva in Paramount's" Uncle Tom's Cabin." A bit of 
art in black and white. 

Do actresses enjoy themselves? Sometimes much. 
Frinstance, Enid Bennett had a regular circus in "The 
Biggest Show on Earth." 

Titles are often queer, sometimes weird, and occasion- 
ally just nutty. For instance, the story of "Intelligence" 
is laid in a German beer garden. Ach, Himmel ! by such 
a Blace, it couldn't ! 

William S. Hart has left the Drys and joined the Wets. 
Which is our way of stating that he has quit desert pic- 
tures and is to produce some sea stuff. But, damp or dry, 
he'll be the same ol' Bill. 

Fatty Arbuckle's heft being against and on him, he was 
placed in Class Five by his Los Angela Registration Board. 
Guess the only way Roscoe can butt into the big scrap is to 
enlist as ballast for one of the transports. 

Paramount has a new staress who bears the nippy name 
of "Cuddles" Lee. We tremble lest it creates a fad, and 
they'll all be doing it. Wear your regular name, "Cud- 
dles" — which is Lila, and very, very pretty. 

Metro's "With Neatness and Dispatch" has the first 
"butlerette." This may or may not be a useful hint to 
householders. Adele Barker, who plays the part and likes 
it, claims the first qualification is weight, and 250 pounds 
is the minimum. 

We have seen many hilarious sights during our gay and 
festive career, but Mary Pickford in muff and goggles on 
the hind seat of the motor cycle in "Amarilly" — say, if 
you saw the picture, we dare you to think of that scene 
without laffing ! 

In a magazine article leading staresses unloosen their 
ideas of their ideal man. All of them seem to seek a per- 
son of he-perfection, but one of them — Polly Moran — asks 
for the utterly impossible. Her ideal guy is one who can 
change an auto tire without swearing. 

E. H. Allen, Will Hart's business manager, sent a pur- 
chasing agent into the land of the Zuni for buckskin chaps, 
beadwork and moccasins for a pending picture. He says 
that's all wrong about "Low, the poor Indian," but the 
goods were gorgeous and worth all they cost. 

A character actor who claims to know says, "One 
should always have their characterization thoroughly es- 



tablished in their mind before commencing work," etc. 
He doesn't say so, but we believe he writes for the guid- 
ance of students of motion picture schools of acting. 

In "The Captain of the Grey Horse Troop" Edith 
Storey leaves the village wearing a straw lid embellished 
with cherries. Three years later she returns wearing the 
same bonnet, and the cherries are still there. Hoover 
should give Edie a medal for saving 'em so long. 

Viola Dana, being of a saving disposition, did not dis- 
card the voluminous overalls she wore in "Blue Jeans." 
She had 'em tailored down to her size, and then made a 
garden to wear 'em in. The garden is not much larger 
than a handkerchief, but Viola claims it is awf 'ly deep. 
Runs clear down to China. 

When "The Kaiser, the Beast of Berlin," appeared in 
Emporia, Kan., a fervid patriot in the audience arose in 
anger and the darkness and plunked three bullets into the 
screen Kaiser's anatomy. The newspapers played the story- 
big, until it was learned the gunful gent was simply trying 
to do the right thing by the piano player. Then everybody 
lost interest. 






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SUMMER IS TRYING ON THE COMPLEXION 

Virginia Lee Corbin, four -year-old film star, on Guard, 
against the Freckle. 








UNDEEWOOD PHOTO 



PORTRAIT OF A LADY 

Ambition burns in lureful Theda's breast, 
Ambition secret, therefore more intense. 

She tears her hair (the camera tells it best); 
Her eyes betray her seething soul's suspense. 

Wouldst know the nature of her dearest wish ? 

Wouldst know the boon she craves of fickle fate ? 
Attend and listen ; this is her ambish : 

To change the Empire to the Vampire State. 



EDITORIAL 

Elevate the Screen Picture 

THE SUCCESS of "The Blue Bird" should en- 
courage the Artcraft people to secure more 
literary work of a high standard for screen 
portrayal. The other day I was talking with 
a professor of the University of California, the father of 
three children, about the movies. He was quite enthus- 
iastic as to their great value in a child's education and 
pleasure. The difficult part was, he contended, in their 
non-reliability. His children were never allowed to see 
a picture that either he or his wife did not previously 
see. He spoke so happily and so gratefully of "The 
Blue Bird" and "The Seven Swans," it seems unfortu- 
nate that there are so few like them. 

Vogue of the Motion Picture 

THE ANNOUNCEMENT that the New York Dra- 
matic Mirror has changed owners, and hereafter 
will be devoted entirely to the movies, with a 
complete elimination of all other theatrical 
features, indicates the trend of the times as to tne rela- 
tive popularity of the movies and the spoken drama. 

The time was, only nine short years ago, that not a 
word could be found between the covers of this same 
paper regarding the then struggling, insignificant mo- 
tion picture. Frank Woods, who was at that time on 
the staff of the Dramatic Mirror, became interested in 
the movies, and gradually, largely through Mr. D. W. 
Griffith's entreaties and Mr. Woods's slowly growing in- 
terest, a few pages in the back of the magazine were 
turned over to the reviews of movies. Mr. Woods him- 
self then turned his hand to writing scenarios and wrote 
a series of "Jones" pictures, relating the adventures of 
"Mr. and Mrs. Jones." He is now the head of the sce- 
nario department of the Jesse Lasky Feature Film Co. 

There is at present no paper devoted to the interests 
of the spoken drama only. There are a dozen, at least, 
devoted to the movies. If people did not buy them, they 
would not be, so there is the proof of the pudding. 

Not "Taps," but "Reveille" 

S RANKIN DREW'S name heads the Roll of 
Honor of film folks who have given to the ut- 
• most, even life itself, that liberty may live. 
But twenty-seven years old, the only son of 
Sidney Drew, he was a gifted and successful actor, and 
also a director in pictures. At the earliest-opportunity 
he volunteered for war work in France, and before the 
United States entered the conflict drove an ambulance 
while he qualified for the aviation service, in which he 
met death in a flight over the German lines. Surely he 
is not dead — this friend. The final flight of brave, true, 
free souls like his and Castle's and all the others of the 
glorious company should set at rest forever all doubts 
about immortality. God is just, and they will live as 
long as the ideal of freedom, for which they willingly 
sacrificed all, endures in the human heart. "Greater 
love hath no man than this " 




(Editor's Note: The writer, who 
began her career with the Biograph 
Company, is well known in the mov- 
ing picture world. Her latest success 
was as star in her own striking so- 
ciological play "Charity." She 



is a keen critic and analyst oj 
all that pertains to motion picture 
art, and tells the truth about those 
who are either striving for its 
downfall or working for its advance- 
ment. ) 



Linda A. Griffith 



Comments and Criticisms of a Free-Lance 



By Linda A. Griffith 

(Mrs. David W. Griffith) 



Some Nuisances of the Movies 

THAT entertaining writer, Homer Croy, contributes 
to the "Sun Dial" of the New York Evening Sun 
a few "interesting facts about the movies." 
Mr. Croy, having recently made a close study of 
them, offers the following as his observations: 

667 people are actively engaged in imitating Charlie Chaplin. 

12,»01 cigarettes are smoked daily in motion picture plays. 

99,221 people get into automobiles in motion pictures every night of 
the year. 

99.221 people get out of automobiles in motion pictures every night 
of the year. 

2,223 artists' models are ruined nightly. 

30,123 pies are used daily in the making of motion picture comedies 
in the United States alone. 

14,444 times daily, year in and year out, the sub-title " With the 
Morning" flashes on the screen. 

14,444 times daily, year in and year out, the sub-title "That Night ' 
flashes on the screen. 

As one who has acted in the movies, written scenarios, 
produced them, supplied sub-titles and studied the films 
for ten years past, I not only approve but heartily enjoy 
Mr. Croy's facetious remarks. Many producers and movie 
actors are "wise" to the pernicious use of the cigarette, 
the overworked auto, the ruined artists' models and the 
sub-titles "That Night" and "With the Morning," so Mr. 
Croy cannot "pick" on them. As concerns the auto, it is 
now almost as much a part of modern, everyday life as the 
morning bath. Its use in the movie can be defended, 
therefore. The pie slinging, except when practiced by the 
only Chaplin, might well be dispensed with. And the cig- 
arettes! Wouldn't it be a fine idea if the movie people 
would start a "Smoke Fund," like the Sun's, for the sol- 
diers, and every time an actor wanted to get the effect of 



appearing nonchalant or thoughtful or as though he owned 
ten million and took it calmly, have him deposit the ciga- 
rette in a box, which, when filled, could be sent to the Sun's 
Smoke Fund? It would be a double charity. The soldier 
boys couldn't possibly get more enjoyment from the ciga- 
rettes so saved than the spectator, who would thereby be 
relieved from watching on the screen the continual ' ' puff, 
puff, puff, ' ' of the movie actors. 

Most every producer can plead guilty to the 14,444 
times he has used the sub-titles "That Night" and "With 
the Morning" — but if Mr. Croy will forgive answering his 
genial fun poking with a serious reply, I would ask, did 
he, or anyone for that matter, ever read a theater program 
that did not specify the lapse of time between scenes or 
acts? The programs of motion pictures could not very 
well contain such an announcement as ' ' Between the 365th 
and 366th scene twelve hours elapse." So what is to be 
done about it? I have encouraged a headache more than 
once wondering what could be used in place of "That 
Night," "Later," "A Few Years Elapse," "Months Roll 
By," "With the Morning," "Eventide" and "Sun Up." 
Time lapses must be noted in the movies as much as in the 
play — and it has to be done in a different manner. But 
this is almost sermonizing on "The Limitations and Crude- 
nesses of the Movies." That is not my intent. These 
few expressions were called forth in appreciation of Mr. 
Croy's humorous remarks about the movies. 

De Mille and "The Whispering Chorus" 

Cecil B. De Mille is a modest man! In an announce- 
ment regarding his production of "The Whispering 




{Left)— "The Whisper- 
ing Chorus " is a morbid 
story, but the end dispels 
the gloom. 



(Right) — Mary Pick- 
ford, as Amarilly, the 
little slavey, does excel- 
lent work. 




Chorus," his press agent says: "Cecil B. DeMille has pro- 
duced more wonders in motion pictures than any other liv- 
ing director." No knowledge of the sudden demise of D. 
W. Griffith, Edgar Lewis, Raoul Walsh and Maurice Tour- 
neur has been forthcoming up to the time of writing. Pro- 
ducers as well as actors might happily modify the extrava- 
gant remarks about them that continually greet one in the 
public print. Facts are realities. It is not a reality that 
" Mr. De Mille has produced more wonders than any other 
living director." Without these conceits, one would more 
freely grant that "The Whispering Chorus" is a very fine 
film play. The scenario is well put together; the direc- 
tion and acting are of the best. The story is moral, the 
dominating theme being self-sacrifice. Although the story 
is morbid and depressing, the end dispels the general 



gloom. It leaves one with the comforting thought that the 
dissolution of the body is not the death of the soul. There 
is a lesson for all in ' ' The Whispering Chorus, ' ' and that 
lesson is to obey one's better impulses and reject the 
promptings of the devil that continually struggle to get a 
foothold in, or rather to dominate, mortal man. The audi- 
ence might well be spared the harrowing scenes of the elec- 
trocution. They add nothing to the artistic merits of the 
picture. 

A Rising Star 

Some four years ago I saw a motion picture, the name 
of which I have forgotten. I recall the circumstance on 
account of one of the players, a young woman, and the 
part she portrayed, that of a simple country girl. She had 




"Amarilly of Clothesline Alley " is a sweet, pretty story, well acted, directed, and presented. 




INTERNATIONAL 



intelligence, magnetism and 
fine dramatic feeling. I 
looked at my program to see 
who she might be, and her 
name was Gladys Brockwell. 
I forgot the incident. I for- 
got the girl. I wondered what 
had happened to her. When 
Raoul Walsh's great picture, 
"'The Honor System," was 
produced, there was a part of 
a demi-monde in it, that was 
so splendidly acted I looked 
at my program to see who the 
actress might be. To my sur- 
prise it was Gladys Brock- 
well! Her "make-up" and 
■characterization were in such 
striking contrast to the part 
she had played in the other 
picture in which I had seen 
her that I did not recall her 
on her appearance in "The 
Honor System. " Miss Brock- 
well is now a "Fox" star, and 
one of her late releases was 
-'The Devil's Wheel"— a stu- 
pid, impossible story, very 
badly directed. Miss Brock- 
well did as well as could be 
expected of the cleverest ac- 
tress under the circumstances, 
such good material as Gladys Brockwell, for she certainly 
was being wasted in "TheDevil's Wheel." She is one of 
the few women who can play more than their own vapid 



Charlie Chaplin, with Edna Purveyance, in 
"The Count." 




Gladys Brockwell, in " The 
Devil's Wheel," proves that 
she is possessed of intelli- 
gence, magnetism and fine 
dramatic feeling. 

personalities. Give her a fair 
chance ! Even Theda Bara 
might have to look to her 
laurels ! 



The 



"Her One Mistake " permits Gladys Brockwell to enact 

a double role and in many scenes both characters are in 

action on the screen at one time. 



It seems a pity to waste 



Genius of Charlie 
Chaplin 

When the day is dark and 
cold and dreary, be thankful 
for Charlie Chaplin. When 
the sun is shining brightly 
and cheer and pleasantness 
obtain, give thanks for Charlie 
Chaplin. The long - awaited 
picture, the first from his own 
new million-dollar studio, has 
arrived. "A Dog's Life," 
it is called. It seems the 
exhibitors fussed a bit about 
paying an additional 25 per 
cent, for this picture, which 
overran the usual 2,000 feet 
by an additional 700 or more. 
As it was in the contracts 
that anything over 2,000 feet 
would mean an extra charge 
of 25 per cent., why were the exhibitors peeved? Con- 
sidering the mobs that were on hand at the theaters as 
early as six-thirty p. m. in order to get a seat, and the 
hundreds that had the doors closed in their eager faces 



and patiently waited in the cold entrance way for the sec- 
ond running of the picture, and considering the excellence 
of this Chaplin picture, why need anyone be peeved? The 
audience even endured without protestation (perhaps some 
slept— you couldn't have blamed them if they did) the 
most stupid, deadly dull five-reel picture, a Triangle fea- 
ture, which preceded the Chaplin film in the San Francisco 
theater that I attended. This, I presume, was good busi- 
ness judgment on the part of the house manager to cut 
down expenses by securing a cheap picture to fill out the 
bill and even up for the Chaplin film. The audience sur- 
vived this Triangle picture only in the hope of what was 
coming. One flash on the screen of their beloved ' ' Charles, ' ' 
and they immediately "came to." 

"A Dog's Life" shows what Chaplin can do as actor, 
author and manager. Chaplin is not only the one genuine 
comique the screen has produced. He has dramatic ability 
as well. In one of his early pictures he gave a hint of this 
in a pathetic scene, not much more than a pause and a 
droop of the head. It told volumes. In "A Dog's Life" 
the pathetic note is there, but Chaplin is too wise to think 
the public will ever accept him in serious roles. The pub- 
lic will keep him where they want. him, as the one glori- 
ously funny man of the screen. But though "funny man 
of the screen" he is destined to ever be, he is withal a 
genius. He is the one movie actor universally admired by 
the young and old, from children to their grandparents, 
enjoyed in equal measure by men of intellect and the car- 
rier of hod, by sedate matrons and giggly girls. 

"Hearts of the World" 

The reviewers on the daily and weekly papers in all the 
cities where "Hearts of the World" has been shown so far 
unite in proclaiming this latest photoplay of D. W. Grif- 
fith's the best work he has so far done. "Hearts of the 
World" is Mr. Griffith's masterpiece. The story is simple 
and direct, not involved and chaotic, like "Intolerance, " 
nor melodramatic, like that part of "The Birth of a Na- 
tion" which pictured Thomas Dixon's book, "The Clans- 
man." "Hearts of the World," by its very simplicity, 
humanness and lack of the sensational, touches deeply the 
hearts of the world. To see pictured on a screen, with the 



artistry that is Mr. Griffith's gift, the suffering that this 
war has brought to little children and the aged, and the 
unbelievable barbarity and fiendishness of the Hun, is suf- 
ficiently stirring to stimulate the organization among the 
women of America of a Battalion of Death. The photog- 
raphy is exquisite. The opening scenes of pastoral France 
were masterpieces of composition, with all the softness and 
depth of hand painting. Splendid acting was contributed 
among the men by Bobby Harron as The Boy, little Ben 
Alexander as The Littlest Brother, Robert Anderson as Mon- 
sieur Cucckoo, George A. Siegmann as Von Strohm, and 
George Nichols in the small part of a German Sergeant. 
The surprise was Dorothy Gish, who revealed herself for 
the first time as one of the clever ones. She was quite ir- 
resistible, contributing to a flawless performance delicious 
comedy and touching pathos. Any person who sees 
"Hearts of the World" and doesn't want to stick a saber 
in a Hun must be pro-German. It's that kind of a picture. 

California's First Theater 

One cannot escape the movies ! At the charming Hotel 
Del Monte, by the side of sleepy, dreamy old Monterey, I 
thought to spend a week oblivious of the flickering films. 
The wonderful motor roads, the cypress groves and the 
blue waters of the picturesque Monterey Bay, the flowers, 
the white sandy beaches and the many landmarks in this 
old California town — one of the few that have preserved 
the atmosphere of the day before the Gringo came — have 
sufficient interest to more than fill any visitor's days. Here 
is the old adobe house where Robert Louis Stevenson lived 
and wrote for two years ; the old Custom House, from 
which the American flag was first flown in California; 
Colton Hall, the first capitol of California; the General W. 
T. Sherman rose tree, where the general, so the story goes, 
courted and wooed a dark-eyed senorita; and two of the 
oldest missions. As if to leave nothing lacking, now pre- 
served as a museum, stands the oldest theater in California. 
Part of the building was Jack Swan's cafe and part was 
used as a storehouse. 

The first theatrical performance in California took place 
in the room used as a storehouse at Monterey and it came to 
(Continued in advertising section) 




Here, at Monterey, preserved as a museum, stands the oldest 'theater in California. And in this 
building, in May, 1918, "Amarilly of Clothesline Alley " was shown. 







THE NEW MOVIE THEATER AT YAPP'S CROSSING TAKES A LOCAL FEATURE REEL 




THE MOVIE PIE-PLANT 

(To Constance Talmadge) 
Sing a song of Constance, with the laughing eye. If it is, then throw one, he it hit or miss ; 



Lady of the pie-plant, is't for movie-pie ? 



Who would dodge a pie made of pie-plant such as this ? 



The Motion Picture Press Agent in Wartime 



By Pat Bowling, U. S. N. 



THE press agent sat in his little swivel chair amidst 
clouds of aromatic tobacco smoke — and he thought 
and he thought. But he didn't think long, be- 
cause the telephone bell was ringing — again. 

"Darn!" he said, as he took down the receiver and 
said "Hello!" oh, so sweetly, as only a press agent can. 
Even as you and I. 

"Yes, this is the publicity department," he cooed, as 
he gnashed the end of his cigar. "The Red Cross benefit? 
Oh, I see ! Well, Miss Hobnob, you know it is very diffi- 
cult to say this far ahead whether any of our stars will be 
able to attend or not. You know they are scheduled to be 
working in their pictures, and really we can't tell — What's 
that? Oh, no! I'm sure they would be only too glad to 
take part, if they are in the city. I'll let you know. . . . 
Yes, surely. . . . Not at all. . . . Go-o-o-d-by !" 

The press agent lit his cigar again. "Another of those 
benefits! I'm patriotic, all right, but you would think — 
Now, wouldn't you think those people would realize our 
stars have to work — once in a while, at least?" This last 
he addressed to a ravingly maniacal director who had just 
entered the lair of the publicity department. 



"You would think so," agreed the director. "What's 
the matter with me? Everything! Half way through the 
picture, and one man's killed in a wreck, the juvenile is 
called out to go to his training camp, and the star's gone 
to San Diego to entertain some soldiers ! And the office 
expects me to finish on schedule. Aw, everything's all 
wrong!" 

The press agent sank into his swivel chair dejectedly. 
The tinkle of the bell at his elbow jostled him into fresh 
mental disorder. "Oh, hello, Mrs. Clymer! The Yule- 
tide Festival for charity? Sure, we'd like to help. Mar- 
guerite Pickford? Now, I don't know whether she could 
come or not. You know she is going to be on location in 
Santa Cruz all next week. . . . No, I don't see how she 
could come back for the festival. You know it's five hun- 
dred miles, and salaries are pretty big, you know, and de- 
lays are costly. Oh, surely, I'll find out. Yes, I'll let you 
know. . . . Not at all. . . . Go-o-o-d-by!" 

The bell tinkled again while the earpiece was still warm. 
"Yes, Robbins. How are you? What are you promoting 
now? All-Star Benefit? Yes — where? . . . Oh, Audito- 
rium! . . . February 20th? You want Douglas Chaplin 



to put on a sketch. Sure, we'll do all we can. But that's 
a long way off. . . . Yes, I know it's for the government, 
but Doug might be dead by that time — or in Arizona. . . . 
Sure, that's almost as bad! . . . Ha, ha! . . . Oh, sure, 
we'll send a check right away to start off the fund. . . . 
No, that's all right. Don't mention it. So long!" 

Once again the bell buzzed. 

"Red Star Dog Show? Well, I don't know. . . . You 
saw a picture of Louise Dana's chow? . . . Oh, that was 
just a photograph. I don't think she has any dogs of her 
own. . . . Call her up? Well, I don't know. We don't 
have any 'phone numbers of stars. You might try, though. 
. . . Could she come down and auction off the toy dog? 
Oh, yes, I think she'd be glad to. That is, if she is in 
town. You know we never know till the day before whether 
they're going on location or not. Surely, I'll let you know. 
. . . Not at all. . . . Good-by!" 

The press agent reached for a pad of notes. "I'll write 
that story now or bust ! " he said, with much vigor, first 
brushing the ashes off his clothes where he had dropped the 
cigar end in the excitement. 

"Bust! Darn it!" he muttered, as he took down the 
receiver. "This is the publicity department, " he said, not 
quite as suavely as usual, but still suave. "No, I am not 
Mr. Goldsky. I merely represent him in a publicity way. 
Oh, yes, we have a great many stars in our company 
You're having a parade? For the Marine Fund Affair. 
Oh, yes. . . . Oh, no, we haven't any bathing girls. 
Would suggest you call up the studios, Wilshire One- 
Five. ... No, not at all. . . . Good-by!" 

The press agent hung up the receiver and struck a pose 
similar to that of Little Nell in Badman Gulch, just after 
her hero had been dragged away by the bandits and the 



villyun stood threateningly before her. He gazed out of 
the window reflectively. "Gosh, there goes Vivian Min- 
ter! I've got to get those photographs to-day or bust!" he 
ejaculated, as he raised the window sash. "Oh, Miss 
Vivian! How about some poses this afternoon? Just a 
little snapshot stuff at the house?" He was talking through 
the window and gesturing with one hand while reaching 
for the telephone with the other. 

"Can't do it to-day," came back at him from the star. 
"Have to pour tea for the Ladies' Auxiliary of the local 
Allied Relief Fund. Charity event, you know. Have to 
go. I'm sorry about the photographs." 

The press agent was talking over the 'phone again after 
closing the window. "Of course you understand, Mrs. De 
Cheas, we'd be glad to send Wally Farnum down, but I'm 
pretty sure he's going to be working this afternoon. . . . 
Oh, no, he couldn't take a vacation! . . . He's already 
been away three shooting days this week. . . . Yes, he'd 
be glad to, but — Yes, I realize the Society for Collecting 
Old Tires is doing a great work, but really, you know — 
Oh, surely, I'll do the very best I can. You can count on 
us. Yes, we'll send a check this afternoon. Not at all. 
. . . Good-by!" 

The press agent felt sure he could see at least seven 
more gray hairs when he stepped to the mirror in his ste- 
nographer's office. He went in to dictate a letter to the 
home office, asking for two more assistants, but the 'phone 
had rung again. 

"This is Mr. Pusher," he said wearily, as he reached 

out to sign for a registered postal card. "An ad in your 

program, did you say? . . . Oh, the benefit for the Great 

Aunts of the Algerian Expeditionary Troops. ... Of 

(Continued in advertising section) 







WHAT DAVID AND GOLIATH MISSED BY BEING BORN TOO SOON 



James Montgomery Flagg's "Lonesome Girl" 



KHMMMMH| 




The only man for miles and miles was 
Hermes, who had whiskers. 



Pansy Mullen, in "Advice to the 
Lovelorn," had told Molly to forget 
Hermes and so she tried fishing. 



TOWN AND COUNTRY FILMS 



This is the twelfth and last of James Montgomery 
Flagg's one-reel comedies, in which "Girls You Know" 
have won so many friends. "The Lonesome Girl" is Molly 
Fipps (Florence Dixon). She has a great disappointment 
when she finds her bearded friend Hermes of the mountains 



is married. She tries to forget, but in vain ; she is haunted 
by this bearded face everywhere. Suicide is a failure 
'cause " blondes don't sink," so, lonesome and lovesick, 
she leaves for Camp Upton for new "spoils." The moral 
is, "If at first you don't find love, move, move again." 




'Gulliver's Travels" would have been as nothing com- 
pared with Fairbanks' s travels upon Gulliver. 



What Douglas Fairbanks Missed 

THE trouble with History and Literature and Legend 
is that they were in too much of a hurry. They 
didn't wait for Douglas Fairbanks. They happened 
or were written before Douglas was born, thereby denying 
him opportunities of which he would have made much. 
Film Fun suggests, in the accompanying pictures, three 
occasions well suited to his agility or his smile. Dean 
Swift might have fitted him nicely into a scenario of "Gul- 
liver's Travels," and kept Gulliver from getting bored or 
dropping off to sleep. With him, Browning might have 
had a happy ending, instead of a dismal one, for his ' ' Pied 
Piper of Hamelin. ' ' And as for Chaucer, not on his ' ' tales' ' 
alone would the Canterbury Pilgrims have depended for re- 
laxation had Douglas been born some seven or eight cen- 
turies sooner. Literature is full of lost opportunities; so 
is History. What might not a Fairbanks have accomplished 
with the Trojan Horse as a "location"? Or a Roman 
chariot race? As it is, he must be content with such tame, 
modern devices as motor cars and bucking broncos. 




Miiiiiiiiiiijiini.il iiiiiiiiimmiimii iiiiiiiiiiiimimiiii:: ■ 



The hero of ' ' Mr. Fixit' ' could have saved at least an arm- 
ful of Hamelin kiddies from the spell of the Pied Piper. 




And, by various flying leaps to the saddle, he might have put pep in the day's ride of the Canterbury Pilgrims. 



Swat the Fly: An "Educational" Film 




The birth of a nuisance. 




"Ah, I hafgot him!" 




Tlie villainess still pursues. 




FLIES and summer are 
one and inseparable, 
so a " swat-the-fly ' ' 
movie is seasonable. You 
require a moment to recover 
on . reading that a screen 
comedy, featuring the Katz- 
en jammer Kids, has been 
' ' released by the Education- 
al Film Corporation," but 
such is the fact, undoubted- 
ly. In these days one may 
pick up an education from 
the most unexpected 
sources. "Swat the Fly," 
however, is not topheavy 
with educational features. 
The flies, for the most part, 
are light comedians, created 
for the purpose of plaguing 
Ma Katzenjammer and the 
Captain. Captain Katzen- 
jammer, who is painting a 
floor, paints from the border 
of the room inward toward 
the center, and ultimately 
maroons himself. The ver- 
satile Kids have put mo- 
lasses in his paint — a com- 
bination which makes the 
Captain an object of much 
interest to the flies. Of 
course, the Inspector figures 
in the "educational" proc- 
ess. With characteristic 
helpfulness he manipulates 
a vacuum cleaner, as shown 
in one of the adjoining pic- 
tures. A later complication 
includes the Kids, the 
cleaner and a hive of sport- 
ive bees, the bees doing as 
much as any of the cast to 
add to the "educational" 
value of the film. "Swat 
the Fly' ' should be seen by 
all students of the habits of 
flies, bees — and comic sup- 
plements. 




Ping Pong in fly-time. 




The Inspector and the vacuum cleaner. 




The flies make merry. 




Molasses in the paint makes the 
Captain popular. 



A vacuum cleaner has more than 
one use. 



44 



H 



Before They Cut Her Off 



ELLO! Is this the Flicker- 
Flicker Film Company? Well, 
I'm a regular patron of the 
movies, and I have a business 
proposition to make to you. Are you 
listening? Oh, all right. I no- 
tice that one of the most popular 
films is the railroad film — you 
know — the one in which the train 
robbers tie the engineer or kill 
him or something exciting, and 
then start the train down the 
track in the direction of the on- 
coming express, in which 
the daughter of the presi- 
dent of the road is riding, 
you understand. It's usu- 
ally done by the pretty girl 
telegraph operator, who 
climbs on top the big steel 
bridge and drops to the loco- 
motive cab at just the right 
instant and gets into the 
cab. But you know all that? 
Yes, of course you do. 

"Well, here's what I called up to suggest. Maybe you 
think I'm a long time in getting at it, and maybe I am, 
but the idea is worth it. Nothing makes such a big hit 
with an audience as a good kid act, and my little boy, Ed- 
gar — he's just turned five — is as good a little actor as any 
you ever saw in the movies, your own or anybody else's. 
You just ought to see him walk like Charlie Chaplin; 
you'd laugh till you couldn't stand. Well, Edgar has a 
little kiddie car — Yes, I am getting at it just as fast as I 
can — and what I'm going to suggest — and if you don't take 
it up, some more enterprising movie firm will — is that you 
put my little boy in a big feature film, 'The Engineer's 
Baby, ' or something like that. 

"Are you there? Yes, all right. I thought maybe 
they'd cut us off. Well, the usual thing, you know. Lots 
of train pictures and black smoke and men in overalls and 
monkey wrenches; and then, of course, the train robbers 
or the safe wreckers or anything that fits the story. Script, 







/ have a business proposition to make to you 



you call it, don't you? Well — 

somebody ties the engineer or hits 

him on the head with a monkey 

wrench — any way so long as he 

gets unconscious and the engine 

goes down the line. That's the 

same as usual — everybody expects 

that and looks for it — but here's 

where it gets to be different. 

Here's where you make your 

big hit. 

"Edgar — that's my lit- 
tle boy — he's the engineer's 
son. He's playing in his 
front yard, waiting for 
papa's engine to go by, so 
he can wave to it; and 
when he sees papa hanging 
limp out the cab window, 
he knows something's dead 
wrong and that papa's 
train'll be wrecked. This 
is where begins the greatest 
movie chase picture that 
ever was made — if you peo- 
ple have got the enterprise to make it. Hello ! Are you 
there? Oh, all right. 

"The boy starts his kiddie car out after the old man's 
engine, his little legs working like pistons, and him in his 
little car bumping over the space between the tracks. 
Well, he catches up with the engine, grabs hold of the step 
or something, and climbs over the coal to the cab and 
brings the engine to a stop — just four feet from the busted 
bridge. Ain't it a winner? Hello ! I say, ain't it a win- 
ner? It's plum preserves for anybody that'll put it out, 
and I'm giving you the first chance. 

"What's that? Why, say, it ain't any more unlikely 
to happen than a whole lot of the railroad things that you 
do put out. Of course, my son being a minor — he's only 
five — his thousand dollars a week will come to his father 
and me. What? Are you there? Hello ! The Flicker- 
Flicker Film Company? Hello ! I'd like to know who cut 
me off! The telephone service is terrible these days!" 



Drawn by W. H. Hill 
>> 



fiimMmiiiiiiiiiuiimiiiwiinmmmiimiii miimimiii! 



i in i ii in i ii.n 1 1 inn i in ii 1 11,1 1 1 nun n mi i mini mi 



imiiimiiiiniiiiiiiiiimiiiiii 






An unexpected offensive. 



A surprise attack in the rear. 



Summer is the Season of Burlesque; If ^Clec 




The Roman army in the ^"~ 
war to the death ; we'll |\ ' 




Scene : Rome. Mark 
Handy, with Ventul- 
atus and Octoberus, 
decide to "start some- 
thing" in the land of 
Cleo. 



THE movies have entered the realm of burlesque, and it 
is a realm of limitless possibilities. Screen burlesque 
of serious screen drama, if well done, should be as 
popular with a nation-wide audience as were Weber and 
Field's still famous travesties with the Broadway audiences 



of a decade and more ago. 
Nile, ' ' presented by the Re 
of Theda Bara's " Cleopati 
of such modern trifles as 
phones, cash registers, era; 




The historic meeting of Mark and Cleo. Quoth Cleo, 
alluringly, ' 'Stay here a minute till I find my heavy 
kimono." "Hum-m-m," murmured Mark, "rather a 
cool reception, methinks. What you've on is all right." 



The fall of Mark Handy. 

His vampirish friend 

lights his cigar 

for him. 






* *z- 



;y" Interferes With History, Give Up History 




atsy, or the Hussy of the 
Company, is a burlesque 
save for the introduction 
iles, motor cycles, tele- 
l and cigars, it does not 



stray far from the original for its fun. Cleopatsy rouses the 
wrath of Mark Handy when Egypt is shy in its tribute to 
Rome. "Pay your rent," long-distances Mark to Cleo, "or 
I'll come over and clean out the place." He comes, and the 
accompanying pictures give a notion of what happens. 



In the oval to the left is the Cleopatsy of Dora 
Roggers, who believes in the personal touch. 



Cleopatsy' s town house 
in Alexandria. "Drag 
Cleo out here on the 
lawn, ' ' orders Mark 
Handy. "Get rough 
with her. ' ' 





(Vj And otherwise lures 
him, with wiles Cleo- 
patric, till Rome 
loses out. 



Ventulatus, sore on Mark, "brings the bunch over from 
Rome" to wage war. The finish is not as tragic as in 
the versions of Theda Bara or William Shakespeare. 
Mark and Cleo wake up and resume the grind. 



Summer is the Season of Burlesque; If "Cleopatsy" Interferes With History, Give Up History 




Scene : Rome. Mark 
Handy, with. Ventul- 
atu8 and Octoberus, 
decide to "start some- 
thing" in the land of 
CUo. 



THE movies have entered the realm of burlesque, and it 
is a realm of limitless possibilities. Screen burlesque 
of serious screen drama, if well done, should be as 
popular with a nation-wide audience as were Weber and 
Field's still famous travesties with the Broadway audiences 



of a decade and more ago. "Cleopatsy, or the Hussy of the 
Nile," presented by theRolin Film Company, is a burlesque 
of Theda Bara's "Cleopatra," and save for the introduction 
of such modern trifles as automobiles, motor cycles, tele- 
phones, cash registers, crap shooting and cigars, it does not 



stray far from the original for its fun. Cleopatsy rouses the 
wrath of Mark Handy when Egypt is shy in its tribute to 
Rome. "Pay your rent," long-distances Mark to Cleo, "or 
I'll come over and clean out the place." He comes, and the 
accompanying pictures give a notion of what happens. 



Cleopatsy' a town house 
in Alexandria. "Dray 
Cleo out here on the 
lawn," orders Mark 
Handy. "Get rough 
with her." 




The historic meeting of Mark and Cleo. Quoth Cleo 
alluringly, "Stay here a minute till I find my heavy 
kimono.' Hum-m-m," murmured Mark, "rather a 
cool reception, methinks. What you've on is all right " 



The fall of Mark Handy. 

His vampirish friend 

lights his cigar 

for him. 



;-■ 



And otherwise lures 

him, with wiles Cleo- 

patric, till Rome 

loses out. 



Ventulatus, sore on Mark, brings the bunch over from 
Rome" to wage war. The finish is not as tragic as in 
the versions of Theda Bara or William Shakespeare. 
Mark and Cleo wake up and resume the grind. 



Movies From Film Fun's Screen 



D o 

A 


QUIET DAY 


IN 


JAYVILLE 


D W o 


d a 



THE TROUBLES 
SETH DUNKBERRY 

LION-HEARTED 
TOWN-CONSTABLE 




FOR. THE P° R PlG & W»E 

HAY FINE REPAIRS HfN5 HtR£ 



A QUIET DAY IN JAYVILLE: IT IS ALSO QUITE PROFITABLE TO THE INHABITANTS 




%ipr ; if 






THE POWER OF ILLUSTRATION 

Aunt Tessie (describing her favorite screen hero) — He was a tall, powerfully -built man — like 

this, you know. 



From "Daily Talks With Shakespeare" 

Written After Reading the Syndicated ' 'Daily Talks With 
Mary Pickford" 

HOW beautiful is summer! Especially summer 
here at my home at Stratford. The trees are all 
in full leaf, there are flowers everywhere in field 
and wood, the river Avon is singing its slumber 
song of peace and rest, and altogether Stratford is a very 
pleasant place to be. 

Summer, as someone has said, is the top of the year. 
I have been working hard in London on some new plays 
for the Globe Theater, and I just ran down to Stratford for 
a few days to see my father and the old friends in the home 
town. Oh, if you young people who have stage ambitions 
will only remember to love your home town, wherever it 
may be, and to go back to it once in a while, you will 
spare yourself contact with so many of the temptations 
which beset those who rub elbows with the great world 
without. 

I remember, when we were rehearsing " Hamlet, " up 
in London, a poor little fellow came to me and applied for 
the part of the Second Grave-digger. He was very much 
discouraged at the way things were going, and he wished 
the part of the Second Grave-digger, so he could stand down 
and pull the grave in after him. By degrees I got his story 
from him, and the great outstanding fact about it was that 
he had neglected to visit, every so often, his home town. 
Indeed, he couldn't remember where his home town was 



located, so I made him one out of scenery and hung a sign 
on it, as we do at the Globe — a sign reading, "This is your 
Home Town." And he went there and reformed and was 
perfectly happy. He is now head usher at the Globe and 
starts the applause. 

My father, when I told him the circumstances, said: 
"Oh, isn't it lovely here at Stratford in the summer, with 
the trees in full leaf, the flowers everywhere in field and 
wood, and the river Avon singing its slumber song of peace 
and rest ! Bill, old son, what do you say to strolling down 
to the Red Lion and splitting a bucket of sack?" 

Short Scenarios 

I. Elevating the Stage. Four reels. 
Reel 1— Mated. 
Reel 2 — Aggravated. 
Reel 3 — Renovated. 
Reel 4 — Celebrated. 



II. Frenzied Finance, or The Missing Millions. 

reels. 

Reel 1— Trusted. 

Reel 2— Busted. 

Reel 3— Dusted. 

III. The People's Choice. Four reels. 

Reel 1 — Projected. 
Reel 2— Elected. 
Reel 3— Detected. 
Reel 4 — Ejected. 



Three 



The Beanfugles at the Movies 



By Arthur Chapman 



UNFORTUNATELY Colonel and Mrs. Beanfugle had 
dropped in at a moving picture performance just 
before the climax of the last act of a thrilling 
Western drama in two reels. Then the lights 
went up, and the intermission was on. 

"Just our luck to get in here at the wrong time, " sniffed 
Mrs. Beanfugle. "We've 
seen that cowboy throw the 
villain over the cliff to the 
rattlesnakes, but now we've 
got to sit through a three- 
reel sea story and two split- 
reel comedies and a travel 
scene before we can find out 
what the unfortunate man 
did before he was converted 
into snake food." 

"Oh, well, what's the 
difference?" said the colo- 
nel. "I like those things 
just as well when I begin in 
the middle and then go all 
the way round the circuit 
before I get the start of a 
play." 

"That shows how you 
and your whole sex have 
been bluffing all the time!" 
exclaimed Mrs. Beanfugle, 
smiling triumphantly. 

"In what way?" asked 
the colonel dubiously. 

' ' Why, in accusing wom- 
en of being the only ones 
who like to begin their 
stories in the middle and 
read to the end and then 
jump back to the first chap- 
ter and read to the middle. 
That accusation has been 
hurled at us ever since there 
have been any novels. Men 
have claimed that they al- 
ways began stories in the 
beginning and read them 
religiously through to the 
end, but we women — the 
unstable, flighty female sex 
— have persisted in reading 
stories backward and both ways from the middle and 
every way but the right way." 

The colonel settled glumly into his seat. 

"But now what do we find?" continued Mrs. Beanfugle, 
with a rising note of triumph in her voice. "Here are you 
men drifting into these moving picture shows at any old 
time and admitting you like the patchwork effect of it all. 




PARAMO UNT-ARBUCKLE 



FOUR FOR 'FORE 

Why tire yourself yelling when your fingers can 
speak for you, argues Golfer Fatty Arbuckle. 



You come in long after the preliminaries, preludes and 
preambles are out of the way. You haven't the haziest 
idea what has gone before. You don't know why the vil- 
lain hates the hero, and why the heroine's father is plan- 
ning to ship her hastily to the South Seas in order to save 
her life from Black Handers. You don't know why 

the poor girl who works in 
a dynamite factory pauses 
just before starting from her 
humble cabin and says, in 
twelve- inch letters on the 
screen, T don't know why I 
dread to go to work this 
morning.' You don't know 
any of these things, and yet 
you are just as serenely con- 
tented as the woman who 
has begun a novel some- 
where in the seventeenth 
chapter." 

"Aw, shucks!" said the 
colonel. "Please be logical. 
There's a lot of difference 
between movies and popu- 
lar novels." 

"Technioalities again — 
mere technicalities," said 
Mrs. Beanfugle hot! y. ' ' But 
that flimsy refuge avails you 
men no longer, now that our 
sex is turning the search- 
lights of truth on your real 
characters. As a matter of 
fact, you are even more 
curious than women to know 
what is to be the ending of 
any kind of a story. I be- 
lieve you prefer to drop in 
at these moving picture 
places right in the middle 
of a play. Your very lack 
of curiosity as to the causes 
that led to that unfortunate 
young man being fed to the 
serpents would tend to prove 
my theory, no matter what 
you say. ' ' 

"Why not open a thea- 
ter for men and produce 
plays that are begun in the middle? We could leave 
when we liked, if the play suited us, or if it didn't." 

"Well, why not? It would be a good idea. It 
would draw crowds, and there'd be money in it," 
snapped Mrs. Beanfugle, as the lights went down, the 
intermission ended, and the "scenic" began its program 
turn. 



?? 



More Trouble " With Frank Keenan 



Lemuel Deering (Frank Keenan) is a mill own- j 
er whose son is a pure youth who doesn't drink 
or smoke; yet, following the signing of co-part- 
nership papers trouble follows trouble, until son 
is landed in jail and mysteriously rescued by j 
the real <..^.*-:^..:-.. culprit. 





Bills arrive by mail, messenger and even by telegraph, so that 
even the faithful old housekeeper is bemazed. 



"Don't smoke, don't drink. Well, what do 
you do?" 




It becomes necessary to forcibly eject a collector who 
has intruded on a family festivity. 




' Where is my son ? ' ' the surprising query by father 
Deering of the recumbent officer. The rescue 
party has been led by one of son's "Eta 
Bita Pi" brethren and his chauf- 
feur. Loyalty to his frater- 
nity has caused all 
the trouble. 



The breaking oj daughter' s engagement, because 

of son's disgrace, brings to father the 

first ray of comfort. 




A Crimson Episode 



By Charlotte Mish 

ITHIN the darkened picture house, 
Rose took her powder puff 
And dusted well her pretty nose, 
Just what she thought enough. 



w 



But once outside the picture house, 

She couldn't understand 
Why everybody stared and stared, 

And laughed to beat the band. 

But as she passed a mirror by, 

She gasped, "For goodness sake!" 

For she had used upon her nose 
Her rouge puff by mistake ! 

Dialogues Never Heard at the Movies 

Voice of woman in back of you — Oh, I've seen this piece 
before. It's lovely; you'll like it. 

Another voice — Oh, have you seen it? Then you can 
tell us all about it. Who's that feller on the screen now? 
Is he the feller she 

First voice (very firmly) — No, positively not. I am not 
going to explain it all to you and tell you just what the 
next picture is and all that. It would annoy everybody 
within hearing distance of us. 



Fond mother — Can you see, Charley dear?. 

Small voice — Oh, yes, ma. 

Fond mother — The man in front isn't in your way? 

Small voice — No, ma; not a bit. 

Fond mother — Do you understand what the pictures are 
about, or do you want mother to explain them to you as 
they go along? 

Small voice- -J understand 'em, ma. You needn't tell 
me. You just sit back and enjoy yourself. 



Another voice (also male) — Well, I suppose I should say 
I don't, that I detest it; but, as a matter of fact, I like it. 
Even if I live to be 500, I shall never get too old to laugh 
when someone is hit in the face with a pie or a stream 
from a siphon. I laugh for the same reason I do when the 
cross-eyed mule in the Sunday supplement kicks somebody. 
And I don't care who hears me say so. 

"God Save Our Men" 

There's a movie theater in New York where at each 
performance these words are thrown on the screen, with 
the request that the audience join in singing them, to the 
tune of "America": 

God save our glorious men, 
Bring them safe home again 

To land and home. 
Make them victorious, 
Patient and chivalrous, 
They are so dear to us — 

God save our men. 

Maybe the poetry might be improved, but the spirit that 
is manifest in the singing would certainly gladden hearts 
that may be suffering hardship "over there." 



-J 



' ill ! ' v' 





Male voice — Do you care for this crazy, knockabout 
style of comedy? 



AT NIAGARA FALLS 

Gosh, Mandy, this is almost as good as seein' 
it at the movies." 



Registered Emotions of the Screen 

NOT to be outdone by the serious-minded motion picture publications, FILM FUN takes pleasure in printing 
the following register of emotions by the celebrated screen favorite, Miss Imogene Flicker. Miss Flicker's 
facial expression, in all varieties of dramatic situation, is considered marvelous by competent critics who have 
watched her work. Judge for yourself: 



"I love 
you." 



"I hate 
you." 



Scorn and 
loathing. 



'Do not kill 
me." 



Rage and 
despair. 



"Kiss me, 
sweet." 



'Quick! The 
papers !" 



Miss Flicker is a relentless self critic. The perfection of her art is not the result of chance, but of hard study. 
Ten hours daily she has been known to stand before her mirror, while her luxurious limousine is completely glass- 
lined, so that not a moment may be lost to art. On long trips across the continent she makes faces at herself by 
the day in the mirrors of her drawing-room compartment. The photographs of Miss Flicker's interpretations are 
published through the courtesy of the Pentagon Film Company, Inc. 



Uii'i'iini'iiiniii' iiniiiiiiniiu 







DISPIRITING RESULT OF THE MOVIE HABIT 
Picture of a family wishing to travel trying to find a place they have not seen at the movies. 



Perils to Provoke Our Smiles 



By Mrs. D. W. Griffith 



THE big stars of the photoplay nearly always are 
endowed with sporting blood, and I have never 
known one to refuse to do any "stunt," however 
risky, that might be called for in the script. 
When Western pictures were the vogue, the intrepid cour- 
age of the cowboy riders must, I presume, have fired with 
equal courage the actors who 
were playing in the same 
picture. I recall one such, 
a motion picture of Spanish 
California, in which Mary 
Pickford and Henry Wal- 
thall were playing the leads. 
There were some Wild West 
riders in the cast, and Mr. 
Griffith offered a dollar to 
each rider who would "pull 
a stunt." They pulled 
them, all right ! They 
would drop their hats and 
pick them up while madly 
riding. Horses on all sides 
reared on their hind legs, 
their fearless riders sitting 
calmly in the saddle, waving 
aloft their Mexican som- 
breros. 

It is a difficult thing to 
"ride horseback" in amov- 
ing picture, to manage a 
horse and get him to stop at 
the designated spot before 
the camera, to make him 
trot, run or gallop, as the 
situation demands. All the 
time, while you may have 
to spur your horse in the 
left hind leg and say stern 
things to him under your 
breath to make him go, in 
the camera, according to the 
script, there should only be 
recorded on your part a coy 
smile intended for one's 
sweetheart. But all this is 
simple compared to riding a 
horse with a bunch of West- 
ern cowboys. I have seen 
Mary Pickford get away with it. There was never any 
dangerous performance that Mary shirked from — stunts 
on horses, in autos, aeroplanes or falling into muddy 
rivers. The same can be said of many of the stars. 
Think of the chances Pearl White has taken in her 
"serial" career. Mabel Normand is one of the fearless 
ones. Her nerve, willingness and capacity for stunts 
made her a star as much if not more than her acting abil- 




Mrs. D. W. Griffith as an Indian mother in 
Stampede. 



ity, clever actress though she is. It seems the little 
women have been called upon to do the most daring tricks, 
although Kathleen Williams had a season's work when her 
acting support was confined mostly to junge animals, ele- 
phants and such. She worked with them as calmly as an 
ordinary mortal might play with a kitten. The astounding 

performances that take place 
in Mack Sennett's comedies 
and Charlie Chaplin's per- 
fect acrobatics make one 
gasp. It is said that Sennett 
needs a new force of police- 
men every two years — that is 
as long as they last. Watch- 
ing their antics, one won- 
ders how they last that long. 
There are "stunts" that 
every movie actor has to 
perform at some time or 
other. A true picture artist 
has a certain pride in want- 
ing always to be "game" 
when asked to do things that 
have an element of danger 
in them or are unpleasant 
or distasteful. My line of 
work as a picture actress 
was that of an emotional in- 
genue in straight, clean-cut 
dramatic plays. Once in a 
great while I was called 
upon to play in a thriller. 
The things that came my 
way come to every motion 
picture actress. I have stood 
on the edge of the New Jer- 
sey Palisades and jumped to 
a narrow ledge six feet be- 
low, from which ledge was 
a sheer drop to the Hudson 
some hundred feet below. 
I attempted to commit a 
"movie suicide" on the 
brink of the Grand Canyon 
of Arizona, but just as I was 
leaning over to jump, my 
"movie father" rescued me. 
I did what I was asked to 
do, although at first even to look down into the frightful 
depths of the Grand Canyon takes courage. All that night, 
in my sleep and when awake, I was falling down that 
Canyon. « 

Once when playing an Indian girl in the movies, I was 
buried by my Indian movie father in an ant hill for being 
disobedient. My body was dug deep in earth, with only 
my head, which the ants were supposed to eat, protruding. 



EARL V. LEWIS PHOTO 

The 




On my face was smeared 
honey, into which coffee 
grounds were stuck to get 
the effect of "ants." Horses 
were roaming about on the 
location, and although sev- 
eral men were detailed to 
keep them away from me, 
my feeling was none too 
comfortable, wondering 
which horse was going to 
trample my head. Then I 
began to feel cold and damp, 
and the thought of ' ' worms' ' 
began to flitter through my 
mind. This scene should 
have taken a very short time 
to take, but as we were de- 
pending upon the horses to stand still throughout the scene, 
before the ordeal was over time had elapsed. I have been 
hauled up the side of a cliff, a rope around my waist, while 
I was supposedly unconscious. If my face hit a rock as I 
was being hauled up, being unconscious, naturally I couldn't 
put out my hand to protect myself. In another picture, 
also in an "unconscious" condition, I was thrown on my 
stomach over a horse's back, while the horse ran with me 
some distance in this position. I have lost the oars of a 
rowboat in a picture, tipped over a rowboat out on the 
Pacific, and then been rescued by my movie lover, who 
swam to the overturned boat to which I was clinging. The 



Minnehaha's grave in the snow. Hiawatha watching 

the fire he builds to light his loved one's soul 

on its way to the spirit world. 



first time I ever rode a horse 
in a picture (previously I 
had merely sat on a horse's 
back and cringed if he raised 
a foot) was through a burn- 
ing prairie, chased by an 
Indian on horseback. The 
dry grass of the plain was 
set on fire by kerosene. I 
was seated on my horse in 
the distance, waiting for an 
effective blaze, and then told 
to "come on." 

I have been wet and al- 
most frozen, waiting on a 
rock by the seacoast for the 
tide to come up and drown 
me. The only thing to cheer 
my dampened spirits was the picture of the director and 
camera man in their bare feet. For twelve successive days 
I have risen at six a. m., hopped into an automobile at 
seven, ridden fifty miles to the "location," worked all day, 
left at six-thirty, back in town by eight, had a bite and was 
in bed by nine. And once for a week I was snowed in on 
a -mountaintop. We were after the famine scenes from 
"Hiawatha." When they buried Minnehaha (which part 
I played) in the snow, there was no camouflage about the 
scene. As it kept on snowing and we had to get back to 
work in Los Angeles, the only way out was to walk, which 
we did, down the mountain seven miles to the train. 




Experiences that made them 
tame as wood doves. 




' Take the bird away or he'll 
eat it!" 



" I will save you, girl! " 





"Two 

Tough 

Tenderfeet" 

Being the Adventures 
of Polly Moran, Ben 
Tufpin and Charlie 
Lynn in a New Para- 
mount - Mack Sennett 
Comedy 

IN a poker game, after you 
have lost all your money, 
you can still bet your 
watch. But it is just as well to 
make sure it isn't tae watch 
you have just lifted from the 
other fellow, otherwise serious 
complications may follow. 

That's what Charlie Lynn 
did, and as a result Charlie and 
Ben landed on their ears from 
the back of a Pullman train in 
the middle of a hot and thirsty 
desert. Charlie hit the biggest 
rock, for all through the story 
it was he who drew the gritty 
end of things. Ben just fell 
into everything, including love. 
Now, Ben and Charlie were 
tough birds. They were so 
crooked, the very jails were 
ashamed of them. They were 
so tough that the mirrors 
cracked when they passed by. 
But when they fell off that train 
into the desert, they landed on 
some experiences that made 
them as tame as wood doves. 

Polly Moran, the famous 
Girl Sheriff, made a decided hit 
with Ben, who, with the help 
of the ever-present Charlie, 
managed to save her from the 
wiles of Bert Roach, owner of 
the town and would-be owner 
of the Sheriff. For some of the 
humorous details of the adven- 
tures of the "Two Tough Ten- 
derfeet, " see our Spectacular 
Film in Ten Parts on the sides 
of the page. 




Packing all his troubles. 




Ben in the safe, "listens in. 




' You may fire when ready, 
Gridley. 




Ben interrupts a proposal of 
marriage- 




PARAMUUNT-SENNETT 



' ' Haste, noble steed, and away 
to her rescue ! ' ' 



And "all's well that ends 
well." 



A letter from Charlie Chaplin 



To protect 
the public 
from fraud 









CH^ 






To-day- 



Jurs adverting ^ edieSl 
on •» «SS series^ <* t 

pictures tr ^ sl gna* - enU ine 
loo*tf>& !^ e y are not £ 

^itno^ ^ Your s sincerely 



A^ 




A "FIRST NATIONAL") 
ATTRACTION 



J." 111 " '"" " Il1 " ii::umjiiimiiiiimmimi iiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiNiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiimiNiiiiiNiimniiiimiiiiimii 

I The "Letters of a I 
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| help and the right kind of inspira- j 

I tion. | 

If you believe that it is more im- 1 

| portant to know why ten thousand 1 

| fail rather than why one man sue- § 

ceeds, read this book. The Letters | 

| are written in epigrammatic style | 

| with a touch of irresistible humor, | 

1 and they impart a system of quaint 1 

| philosophy that will appeal to every- | 

| one regardless of age, sex or station. | 

I Price $1.00. I 

i Leslie - Judge Company*! 

I 225 Fifth Ave., Dept. FF-8. New York J 




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Comments and Criticisms 
of a Free Lance 

(Continued from a previous page) 
pass in this way. About the time that 
Stevenson's regiment of New York vol- 
unteers was disbanded, three com- 
panies, including the colonel, came up 
to Monterey. Soon after the soldiers at- 
tempted a theatrical exhibition, which 
was a success. Encouraged by the lib- 
eral patronage, the managers induced 
Jack to fix seats, stage and scenery in 
the old adobe. The bills were got out 
in due form, posters printed with a 
blacking pot and brush, and programs 
announcing "Putnam, or The Lion 
Son of '76, " the first piece to be played. 
C. E. Bingham played The Son, 
Mrs. Bingham Martha Washington, and 
Charley Cluchester George Washington. 
The original curtain is still in place. 
It was built by a whaler, is of wood, 
about 10 by 8 feet, and is pulled up and 
held to the ceiling by a rope. Even 
the Metropolitan Opera House is to 
take over the movies for the summer 
months, but here, thought I, is one 
theater that has never shown a movie 
and never will. When I returned to 
my hotel that evening, however, there 
greeting me in the lobby was an an- 
nouncement on the blackboard where 
the daily golf and polo information is 
put forth, stating: "Movies to-night 
at 8:30 in the Ait Gallery. Mary 
Pickford, in 'Amarilly of Clothes Line 
Alley.'" So, after dinner, I "fell." 
I paid my 28 cents and saw Miss Pick- 
ford. I had not seen her for a long, 
long time and enjoyed her "Amarilly" 
quite as much as anything I have ever 
seen her do. It is a sweet, pretty story, 
well acted, directed and presented. 
Kate Price was irresistible as The 
Mother. The audience, composed 
mostly of golfers, gave evidence of 
their enjoyment. 

The Motion Picture Press 
Agent in Wartime 

(Continued from a previous page) 
course, Miss De Bue, our company 
hasn't a great deal of money to spend 
for local advertising. . . . Yes, the 
home office, you know. . . . Yes, I 
suppose we could take a page. ... I 
know it is a worthy cause. . . . I'll 
write the copy. . . . Yes. . . . Not 
at all. ..." 

The press agent reached for the reg- 
istered message and read: "This is to 



1 



notify you that your division of selected 
men in the National Army is summoned 
to depart from this city on March 1st. 
You will report at the Southern Pacific 
station, prepared to leave for Camp 
Lewis at 6 p. m. on that date. (Signed) 
Charles Fuhr, Chairman, District Board 
Number 13." 

"Thank heaven!" murmured Mr. 
Pusher, as he thrust his half-finished 
copy into the waste basket. ' ' Sherman 
said a mouthful, and he never saw a 
studio in wartime, either. I'm glad 
I'm going to the trenches!" 

Heard in the Studio 

Daughter — This new skirt is too short 
for me. 

Mother — You needn't send it back; 
I'll wear it. 

The Drama's Trend 

Tragedian — You tell me, sirrah, that 
I am behind the times? 

Manager— Yes. You come with me. 
I'm going to produce a screen version 
of "Ben-Hur, " with motor cycles for 
the principals in the chariot race. 

Old Stuff 

"This camouflage is not new." 
"Yes?" 

"The Broadway restaurants have 
been using it on their menus for years. ' ' 



Film Fun 

Magazine of Fun, Judge's Library and 
Sis Hopkins' Own Book Combined. 

IUIIIIII1IUIIIIIIIII!llllll!lllll!t[llllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI|llllllllllllllll|lllll:illltlllllltllllllllll!!llllll! 

No. 352— AUGUST, 1918 



Single Copies, 10 Cents 
Subscription by the Year, $1.00 




[| I mill) I 



Published monthly by 



LESLIEyJUDGE COMPANY, PUBLISHERS 

NEW YORK CITY. 
John A. Sleicher, President. 

leuben P. Sleicher, Secretary. 
A. E. Rollauer. Treasurer. 

Grant Hamilton, Art Director. 
Jessie Niles Burness, Editor. 
225 Fifth Avenue, New York. 




iiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiini! 



Ill) 11 lllirilMll 



»f: 



Copyright, 1918, by Leslie-Judge Company, r 
Publishers. 

Title registered as a trade-mark. 

Entered at the post-office at New York as 

second-class matter. 



Advertising Offices: 
225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 
Marquette Building, Chicago, 111. 
Walker Building, Boston, Mass. 
Henry Building, Seattle, Wash. 



FILM FUN is printed by The Williams Printing 
Company. 



Will Nuxated Iron Help Make New 

Age of Healthier Women and 

Stronger, Sturdier Men? 

4 

City Physicians Say That By Enriching the Blood and Creating Thousands of New 
Red Blood Cells It Increases the Strength and Endurance of Delicate, Nerv- 
ous, Run-Down Folks in Two Weeks' Time in Many Instances. 



SINCE the discovery of organic iron, Nux- 
ated Iron or "Fer Nuxate," as the French 
call it, has taken the country by storm, it 
is conservatively estimated that over three mil- 
lion people annually are taking it in this coun- 
try alone. Most astonishing results are re- 
ported from its use by both physicians and 
laymen. 

Dr. Ferdinand King, a New York Physi- 
cian and Medical Author, when interviewed on 
this subject, said: "There can be no sturdy 
iron men without iron. Pallor means anaemia. 
Anaemia means iron deficiency. The skin of 
anaemic men and women is pale, the flesh 
flabby. The muscles lack tone ; the brain fags 
and the memory fails and often they become 
weak, nervous, irritable, despondent and mel- 
ancholy. When the iron goes from the blood 
of women, the roses go from their cheeks. 

"Therefore, you should supply the iron de- 
ficiency in your food by using some form of 
organic iron, just as you would use salt when 
your food has not enough salt." 

Dr. James Francis Sullivan, formerly Physi- 
cian of Bellevue Hospital (Out-Door Dept.), 
New York, and the AVestchester County Hos- 
pital, says: "In my talks to physicians I have 
strongly emphasized the great necessity of their 
making blood examinations of their weak, 
anaemic, run-down patients. Thousands of 
persons go on suffering year after year, doctor- 
ing themselves for all kinds of ills, when the 
real and true cause underlying their condition 
is simply a lack of sufficient iron in the red 
blood corpuscles to enable nature to transform 
the food they eat into brawn, muscle tissue and 
brain. But beware of the old forms of metallic 
iron which frequently do more harm than good. 

"Notwithstanding all that has been said and 
written on this subject by physicians formerly 
connected with well-known hospitals thousands 
of people, still insist in dosing themselves with 
metallic iron simply, I suppose, because it costs 



a few cents less, 
strongly advise 
readers in all cases, 
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to this 
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only 
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purchase 

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without becoming tired. Next take two five- 
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times per day after meals for two weeks. Then 
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Manufacturers' Note: Nuxated Iron, which is prescribed and recom- 
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Haul me 3^, Julia. 

T want to read si* 

four-line jokes. 



I just real this 123 line 
article. I was just in.the.moo2. 

for something that size . 







Do you like your humor long or short? 

There are just as many lengths of humor tirely possible to strike a law of averages, 

as there are kinds of humor. Judge has examined, in large white labora- 
tories erected especially for this purpose, 

It is absolutely ridiculous for you to say thousands of people, thin and fat, oozy op- 
you like long humor better than short timists and purple pessimists, bright and 
humor, or short better than long. A great half-bright, to determine how much long 
psychologist has said, "Sometimes people humor and short humor is good for an aver- 
like their humor short and sometimes long." age normal subject over a week's time. 

Judge has, of course, gone into this mat- Judge is made up in this correct propor- 

ter very deeply. tion of long, short and medium length 

, . , . , , •, , • humor every week. 

Judge has found that, while there is 

no rule as to the proportion of long Don't you feel in your own soul that 

humor a man may consume to good Judge has about the right mixture? Don't 

advantage at a given hour of the judge hastily. Send a dollar for thirteen 

v -v day, or under given circumstances issues and give the subject the consideration 

of stress, or relaxation, it is en- it deserves. 

All Right, 

Judge: 

225 Fifth Ave. 
New York City 

1 accept your offer ^k ^^V 1 * 9 .. 1 

u^'\T^:z oi V^v the nation s perpetual 

that you send me Judge be- ^^ ^x\. "1 i 1 

ginning with the current issue, ^^ ^€^<v CmtlpOiTP r\/"\/^\lz' 

13 numbers in all. 1 enclose ^^ X*» OllUlCavC L/WVjlN. 

S1.00 (or) send me a bill at a later ^. X X 

date. (Canadian SI. 25, foreign, 

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Name 

Street 

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State 




$500.00 for Criticisms 
of Moon Comedies 




FIVE prizes of $100.00 each will be 
paid for criticisms of Moon Comedies 
— the full-of-fun films on up-to-date 
subjects. Read about them on this page, 
see them at your favorite motion picture 
theater and send in your criticisms, which 
may be based on the screen performance or 
the published synopsis of scenario. You 
may win with a criticism of one comedy, or 
you may send in a review of each as it is 
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address must be on the manuscript. Ad- 
dress "Contest Editor, Moon Comedies, 
care of Sunshine Films, Inc., 126 West 
Forty-sixth Street, New York City, N. Y." 
The contest closes October 1st. Payment 
will be made October 15th, 1918. 




SUNSHINE FILMS, INC. 



As a conductorette Aggie becomes 
bread winner for the family when her 
husband loses his job. "Duty" leads 
her through many strange and laugh- 
able adventures, with here and there a 
touch of romance and a spice of dan- 
ger. The film ends with each member 
of the interesting family "doing his 
bit" to win the war. 




"Their Downfall" might very well have been called the "four-bits worth of fun," 
because of the hairbreadth escapes a certain half dollar figures in. The play opens 
with two adventurers who have seen better days than this particular one on which 
a square meal seems the most to be desired of earthly blessings. They get it, and 
many a laugh as well by their clever juggling with circumstances, but when the 
"copette" comes into the picture, that's their downfall. 




Reduce Your Flesh 

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Dr. Walter's 

Famous Medicated 

Reducing Rubber Garments 

For Men and Women 
Cover the entire body or 
any part. Endorsed by 
leading physicians. 

Send for 
illustrated booklet. 

Dr. Jeanne F.F.Walter 

353 5th Ave., N. Y. 

(Billings Hide.. 1th Floor) 

(Enl. on 34th St. ,3rd Door East) 



$5.50 
$2.00 



See 



Leslie's 

Illustrated Weekly Newspapct 

Established in 1855 

for the Best War 
Pictures First 

For sctle on all news-stands 
Ten Cents Every Week 



You Can Have 
Beautiful Eye- 
brows and Lashes 

by applying "Lash-Brow-ine" nightly. 

It nourishes the eyebrows and lashes, 
makin» them long, thick and luxuri- 
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charm and attractiveness. "Lash-Brow- 
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preparation, used successfully by thousands. 
Send 50c and we will mail you "Lash-Brow-ine" 
and ourMaybell beattty booklet prepaid in plain 
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[,AH0UATOKIF.«. 4805-57 Grand Blvd.. Chicago 




REDUCE DOUBLE 

Davis Chin Supporter keeps mouth tight- 
ly closed during sleep, prevents snoring, 
strengthens sagging chin muscles, and ef- 
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Light, durable, washable. Silk, S4.O0: Mesh, 
$3.00; Linen, $2.50; Cotton, $1.50. 3 sizes. 

Send Stamp for Free Health Leaflet. Sold at 
Liggett, Hetherington, Knlish Drug Stores. 
Cora AT. Davis, 507 5th Ave.. Kept. FK, N.T.C. 



CHIN 




SUCCESSFUL PHOTOPLAYS BRING BIG MONEY 

Send us photoplays, or ideas, any form. We revise, type, copy- 
right, submit to producers. Sales fee 10 per cent. Send for our 
free book, 

"$UCCE$$FUL PHOTOPLAYS" 

which tells how to write photoplays and describes our service. 

NATIONAL, PHOTOPLAY SALES CO. 

Box 422, Dee Moines, la. 



McAdoo and Roosevelt Wear 
SERVICE BUTTONS 

Wear one for YOUR boy. The size of Liberty Loan buttons, price 
25 cents each. SERVICE FLAGS of beautiful silk, 60 cents each. 
The Kaiser's Prayer — "Hell's Protest" — on neat bond paper, 
price 25 cents. Views of U. S. Army Cantonments, sample 25- 
cents. Views of Alaska, 2 for 25 cents. 

RUBLE McNEILL - - BOAZ, KENTUCKY 



$50 to $100 Weekly ™%\ 



moving: pic- 
ays in spare 
time. Great demand. YOU can write them. We 
show you how. Experience not necessary. Send for 
free booklet of valuable information and special 



Prixe Offer 



Chicago Photn-playright College, Box 27S-G30,Chi'go 



$— Old Coins Wanted— $ 

$4.25 EACH paid for U. S. Flying Eagle Cents dated 1856. 
$2 to $500 EACH paid (or hundreds of Coins dated before 1910. 
Send TEN cents at once for our New Illustrated Coin Value' 
Book, size 4x7. It may mean your fortune. Get posted. 
CLARKE COIN CO., Box 26, LE ROY, N. Y. 



SONG poems 



Write us words for a song. 
We will compose the 
music and facilitate free 
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Buyer's Guide for 
Film Fun Readers 

You can learn a great deal about what you're thinking 
of buying by writing to the manufacturers for their cata- 
logs — especially if you don't know of a convenient store „ 
where you can look at the goods themselves. 

Most manufacturers publish complete catalogs about 
their products, anchare glad to send these to any in- 
quirer who is genuinely interested. 

Even if you're not sure of buying right now, it's a 
good thing to send for the catalog and "read up" on it; 
then when you are ready to buy you'll be sure of buy- 
ing the right product, and you'll know exactly the kind 
of service you can expect from it. 

And frequently your finding out more about it now 
will make you want to get it a good deal sooner than 
you anticipated. 

Here are some brief reminders typical of the variety 
of prospective purchases you can learn about through 
the advertising columns of FILM FUN : 



Artists— Outfit offer and booklet on " How 
to become An Artist " sent free by Washington 
School of Art, 13+1 H. Street, N. W., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Artists — Terms on course on how to become an 
artist, and list of successful students sent free 
by Associated Art Studios, 82-B Flatiron Bldg., 
New York City. 

Books — Circular of Information on W. E. 
Aughinbaugh's book, "Selling Latin America," 
sent free by Small, Maynard & Co., 16 Beacon 
St., Boston, Mass. 

Books— Brunswick Subscription Co., 225 Fifth 
Ave., New York City, will send full particulars 
regarding special price and terms for complete 
works of Guy de Maupassant on request. 

Bunion Relief— Foot Remedy Co., 3583 W. 26th 
St., Chicago, will send Fairyfoot remedy to you 
on trial, free. 

Business Incorporation — Laws, blanks, and 
directions for incorporating your business in 
Arizona will be sent free upon request by Stod- 
dard Incorporating Co., Box SM, Phoenix, 
Arizona. 

Chalk Talk — Particulars, testimonials, and a 
sample evolution sent free by Clyde Truman, 
Room C, 1755 E. 55th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Health— a free booklet entitled "The What, 
the Why, and the Way of Internal Bathing " 
will be sent by Chas. A. Tyrrell, M. D., 134 W. 
65th St., New York City. 

Health— Free copyrighted books on " Con- 
scious Evolution " and "The Science of Life" 
sent by Alois P. Swoboda, 2103 Berkeley Bldg., 
New York City. 

High School Course — Booklet and full particu- 
lars on a high school course that you can finish 
in two years sent free by American School of 
Correspondence, Dept. P. 1592, Chicago. 

Homes — Harris Home Plan Book containing 
100 modern Harris Home designs will be sent 
free upon request by Harris Brothers Co., Dept. 
FM 263, Chicago. 

Lettering and Show Card Writing — Free booklet 
on this subject sent upon request by Litholia 
System of Lettering, Dept. 223 Flatiron Bldg., 
New York City. 



Music — The story of Hawaiian Music will be 
sent free by The Hawaiian Institute of Music, 
1100M Broadway, Nevy York City. 

Music — A booklet and wonderful tuition offer 
on learning to play the cornet will be sent by 
International Cornet School, 670 Federal St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Music — A 64 page booklet on " How to Learn 
Piano or Organ " will be sent free by M. L. 
Quinn Conservatory, Studio ZS, Social Union 
Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

Music — Free book giving facts and particulars 
on learning music at home sent by U. S. School 
of Music, 327 Brunswick Bldg., New York City. 

Photo Plays — Full particulars on writing pho- 
toplays sent free by Writer's Service, Dept. 28, 
Auburn, N. Y. 

Photo Plays— a free booklet of valuable infor- 
mation on writing motion picture plays, and 
special prize offer will be sent upon request by 
Chicago Photo-playright College, Box 278-G28, 
Chicago. 

Photo Plays— a booklet on " Successful Photo- 
plays," telling how to write such plays, will be 
sent free by National Photoplay Sales Co., Box 
422, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Photo Plays— Free booklet on "Photoplay 
Writing " sent by Midland Motion Picture Co., 
Box 469, Des Moines, la., upon request. 

Short Stories — Photo Plays— Free booklet on 
" How to Write " sent upon request by Hoosier 
Institute, Short Story Dept., Desk 1593, Fort 
Wayne, Ind. 

Story and Movie Play Writing — A little book of 
money-making hints, suggestions, etc., sent free 
■by Writer's Service, Dept. 28, Auburn, N.Y. 

Tricks— a small catalog on tricks will be sent 
free bv Hornmann Magic Co., Sta. 5, 470-8th 
Ave., New York City. 

Tricks — Puzzles, jokes, magic goods for home 
or professional use. Free catalog — Oaks Magic 
Co., Dept. 518, Oshkosh, Wis. 

Typewriters— The Oliver Typewriter, formerly 
$100. now $40. De Luxe catalog and book "The 
High Cost of Typewriters — the Reason and the 
Remedy " free from The Oliver Typewriter Co., 
1044 Oliver Typewriter Bldg., Chicago, 111. 



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A Moving Picture Scenario 

The Uncertainties of Life 



BUSINESS office of Gayboy & Co. 
Jim Gladhand enters and asks 
Gayboy for the fifty dollars he 
owes him. Doesn't expect it, but is 
handed the money in crisp bank notes. 
Exits overwhelmed by emotion. 

II 

Drawing-room of Miss Charmer. 
Gladhand, very much smitten, calls, 
determined to press his suit. Doesn't 
expect to be greeted very cordially, but 
is encouraged by Miss Charmer's smiles 
and is finally accepted. Exits very 
much agitated. 

Ill 

Office of the Highbrow Magazine. 
Gladhand, who is a disciple of the 
Muses, enters with a "little thing" he 
has turned out. Expects to be turned 
down, but after the manuscript is read 
is effusively treated by the editor and 
is handed a check. Exits with a flut- 
tering heart. 

IV 

Bachelor apartment of Jim Gladhand. 
Gladhand returns and finds a letter from 
a legal firm, informing him that an 
uncle, whom he has not heard from in 
ten years, has left him twenty thou- 
sand dollars in stocks and bonds, and 
directing him to call for the stuff at 
once. Puts letter down, much moved. 
Lights a pipe and lingers over the way 
things have been going with him, and 
is so shocked by all that has happened 
that he falls into a comatose state and 
dies as easy as falling off a log. Enter 
coroner, who delivers the verdict: 
Killed by kindness and good fortune. 
Curtain. 

A Modern Achilles 

A bet was overlooked 
When Percy wasn't booked 
To sail across the Drink and meet 
The foeman face to face. 
Because to him a shot 
In any vital spot 
Would faze him not a particle 
Nor leave a single trace. 

For this immortal Goof 
Is truly bullet-proof; 
They shoot him several times a week 
In every town he goes. 
And still he's on the job, 
Serenely up he'll bob, 
For Percy is the villain in 
The moving picture shows. 



Save the 

Thoughtless 




ws.s. 



WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

ISSUED BY THE 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



ars 



"/ got the sweetest hat today. And, my dear, of course, 
I didn't really need it, but — " 

* * * * 

"What if it is only a few blocks? Here, taxi!" 

* * * * 

"I know I'd feel a lot better if I ate less, but I simply 
must have a big order of — " 

& Hi H* % 

Over there in the Picardy mud, pock-marked with 
significant craters and "plum-caked" with unspeakable 
things that once were men, our soldiers can't hear all 
that some of us are saying. Good that they can't, isn't 
it? It wouldn't make it any easier to stand firm against 
those blood-crazed, grey hordes who come on wave 
after wave because they believe their Kaiser is "God's 
anointed shepherd of the German people." 



It isn't that we Americans are a selfish people. We 
have simply been thoughtless. 

Money is needed to win this war — let's give it. So far, 
we have been asked only to lend — to lend at a good round 
4% interest. Turn your THOUGHTLESS dollars into 
War Savings Stamps. 

NATIONAL WAR SAVINGS COMMITTEE, 
WASHINGTON 




Contributed through Division of Advertising United States Gov't, Comm. on Public Information 

This space contributed for the Winning of the War by 
PUBLISHERS OF FILM FUN 



.- _— _, , _- — ^_. __ .--._ „ _ -^— ~Y^" --<- ~ • r - - -—- - 



- T ,^_^_ rr „_.-^ < _-,,.-. - _ 



1 




ArelfouTboVW$e to beNatural? 



BEEN seeing good pic- 
tures? Want to be 
sure you're going to keep 
on seeing them? Easy. 

Both Paramount and Art- 
craft trade-marks have come 
to mean so much to so 
many millions that the 
words photoplays" are al- 
most superfluous. 

Paramount and Artcraft 
are that fine — in stars, in 
direction and in character. 
* * * 

Ever wish you could for- 
get all the fol-de-rol of din- 
ner coats and calling cards 
and that sort of thing? And 
get a bunch of corn silk and 
soft-foot it behind that big 
rock — and light up with 



Joey, your particular pal. 
And get sick and every- 
thing? 

Or, are you too wise to be 
natural — are you afraid to 
play hookey from yourself? 

You're not? Goodenough. 
Then you've kept your grip 
on the greatest thing in life. 

And the spirit of play, of 
make-believe, is what lets 
you go on, day in and out, 
forgetting those practical, 
prosaic things that hold your 
nose to the grindstone. 

It's no secret at all — the 
gate to the great playground. 

You'll find it on the 
screen of the modern mo- 



tion picture theatre — the 
theatre that advertises and 
shows the motion pictures 
of the American family — 
Paramount and Artcraft 
pictures. Paramount and 
Artcraft pictures are the 
better pictures of the mo- 
tion picture art — supreme 
in stars, masterly in direc- 
tion, superb in mounting 
and discriminating and au- 
thoritative in the literature 
and drama they visualize. 
* * * 
You, too, can see and en- 
joy Paramount and Artcraft 
pictures — they are made for 
you. There is a theatre 
near you that shows them 
because your kind of people 
want them. 



(paramount <^GHera£t 

jHotian Cplciur&s " 

fT*1L~-~ „ IJT'^.,.^4-^ IS~„„ „^„. how to be sure of seeing Paramount 
J /tree VV ay S 10 KnOW and Artcraft Motion Pictures 

OJ16 B y seeing these ttVO By seeing these thl'66 By seeing these 

trade-marks or trade-marks or trade-marks or 

names in the advertise- names on the front of names flashed on the 

ments of your local the theatre or in the screen inside the 

theatres. lobby. theatre. 




FAMOUS PLAYERS -LASKY CORPORATION 

ADOLPH ZUKORPw JESSE L:LASKY !/«r JVw CECIL B DE MILLE Dtrvavtonenl 

TNEW YORK^ J 

jjubju" mmmmmmmmm 
FOREMOST STARS. SUPERBLY DIRECTED, IN CLEAN MOTION PICTURES 




^M 



ilm 



And The Magazine 
of Fun, Judge's 
Library and Sis Hopkins' 
Own Book Combined 



tin 

A Monthly Reel 

of Laughs k | 



Price 10 Cents 
SEPTEMBER 



1 



n*6 



4- 



OTICE TO 
READER. 

When yon finish read- 
ing this magazine, place 
a one-cent stamp on this 
notice, mail the maga- 
zine, and it will be 
placed in the hands of 
our soldiers or sailors 
destined to proceed 
overseas. 
NO WRAPPING 
-NO ADDRESS. 



8 




/"ersrsry /ft 



COPYRIGHTED, 1918, BY FILM FUN 



"GIMME A DIME FOR THE MOVIES!" 



■■■™^^ 



VIRTUE IN THE BALLET 



with every 
very small 
and of the 



Of all the witches and semi-witches of that eternal Wa 1 - 
purgis Night that represents the world, the ladies of the ballei. 
have at all times and in all places been regarded as least like 
saints. 

Whenever a new, youthful dancer appeared at the Paris 
Opera House the habitues vied with each other in showering 
her with attentions and in overwhelming her with a veritable 
broadside of Cupid's artillery. 

For how could these young and pretty girls 
right to life, love and pleasure, and subsisting on a 
salary, resist the seduction of the smell of flowers 
glitter of jewels ? 

She had the voluptuous form of a Greek Helen and she 
took the old guard of the Opera House by storm. The very next 
morning a perfect shower of billets-doux, jewels, and bouquets 
fell into the poor dancer's modest apartment. 

He was a rich stockbroker, one of those "generous gen- 
tlemen," if the object of his momentary fancy was young and 
pretty and apparently unsophisticated. And then there was 
another, who sent no diamonds, and not even flowers, but who 
was young and goodlooking, though poor, and who worshipped 
her from afar until that memorable night — but read the whole 
story for yourself as Maupassant tells it — an amusing story that 
is a gem of art and irony, a story with an unexpected ending 
that will do your heart good, and found with all Maupassant's 
other inimitable stories, his novels, his poems and dramas, in 
this superb VERDUN EDITION of 

THE COMPLETE WORKS 

OF 

GUY de MAUPASSANT 

UNABRIDGED AND UNEXPURGATED 

Maupassant does not moralize. In the wonderful pictures he gives of the 
world he lived in virtue is praised and vice is condemned rather by events 
and action. If he is terribly real, and the nudity of his human nature is 
startling in its effect, it is because his stories mirror life as he found it. 

A SPECIALLY LOW BEFORE- PUBLICATION PRICE 

READY IN A FEW DAYS A Fine Library Edition REALISM UNALLOYED 




By the time your order can reach us the 17 
volumes will have been delivered to the binder. 
Every day's delay means a substantial increase in 
price to you. The response to this be fore-publica- 
tion offer will enable us to estimate the size of 
our order for binding. We give before-publication 
subscribers the benefit of the saving we make by 
ordering in quantity. 

$1.00 NOW AND COUPON 

secures your set at the present before-publication 
instalment price of $19.00. Then payments of $1.50 
(or more) a month after you receive the books. 
Subscriptions filled in the order in which received. 
Preference in order of shipment naturally 
given to subscriptions accompanied by the pres- 
ent before-publication cash price, $18.00. Books 
delivered charges prepaid. 

MONEY BACK IF NOT SATISFIED 



BRUNSWICK SUBSCRIPTION CO. F. F.9 

1116 Brunswick Bldg., New York City 

I enclose $1.00 first payment on the 17 volume set of the 
Verdun Edition !>f Maupassant to secure my copy at the 
present before-publication price, $19.00, which I agree to 
remit at the rate of SI. 50 [or more] a month following re- 
ceipt of books. Otherwise I will within five days ask for 
instructions for their return, at your expense, my $1.00 to 
be refunded on their receipt. 

Name 



g Address 

% Occupation State . 



The beautiful full page frontispiece 
illustrations have been specially made for 
the VERDUN EDITION by the talen- 
ted artist, J. E. Allen. This is the only 
English translation of Maupassant con- 
taining illustrations that interpret his 
stories pictorially with strict fidelity to 
the spirit of the text. 

17 Volumes in Rich Cloth Binding 

Each Volume 8 1-4 x 5 1-2 inches 

Big, Clear 12 Point Type on 

Pure White Antique Paper 

5,500 Pages That Will Hold You Chained by 
the Hour 

347 Stories, Novels, Novelettes, 
Poems, Dramas. Entertainment for 
a Thousand and One Nights. Love 
and Life in Strange Lands — Paris, 
The Orient, The African Hinter- 
land. Stories of War, Crime, 
Mystery and Horror. 

Send Today to Get the Benefit of the Bef ore- 
Publication Price 



The petty meannesses of human nature 
and the passions — lust and cupidity — which 
stir most men and women to action did not 
stay Maupassant's impartial hand so long 
as this ugly side of humanity existed. 
Pitiless as is his art, at times he surprises 
us with a touch of tender pathos in which 
we recognize the warm heart of a fellowman. 

GREATEST OF STORY 
WRITERS 

As the supreme master in what is one 
of the most difficult forms of art — the short 
story — Maupassant's fame has extended 
into all civilized lands. Tolstoy marveled 
at the depth of human interest he found in 
his stories: Andrew Lang declared he found 
in him "the tenderness of Fielding, the 
graphic power of Smollett, the biting satire 
of Dean Swift, mingled and reincarnated 
in Gallic guise;" and Henry James hailed 
him as " a man of genius who had achieved 
the miracle of a fresh tone." 



Illlllllliir 



AUG 12 1918 



>CI.B4 17 533 



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PARAMOUNT-ARBUCKLE 



CALIFORNIA SEA-URCHINS 
It is high tide when Fatty's in; low tide when he's out. 



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Film Fun 

225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

An Independent Illustrated Monthly Magazine 
Devoted to the Best Interests of All 
Motion Picture Art and Artists 

SEPTEMBER-1918 



o n 



n 



ILLUSTRATED FEATURES : 

Passed by the Board of Censors 

Movies from Film Fun's Screen 

The Movies at Yapp's Crossing 

Motion Pictures Follow the Flag 

Your Favorite Location 

The Call of the Quill 

The Homing of Packsaddle Pete 

Seeing Battles Over Again 

Her Career 

A One-reel Thriller 

EDITORIALS : 

Civic Improvement and the Films 
The Critic and the Movies 



James Montgomery 
Flagg 



Jessie Niles Burness 

Howard Dietz 
Arthur Chapman 
Ernest A. Dench 
Walt Mason 
A. H. F. 



COMMENTS OF A FREE LANCE : 

Films Rushed to Their Ruin LlNDA A. GRIFFITH 

Quality, Not Quantity 

X-Ray Movies 

Artless Art 

To "Register" Success They 

Must Rehearse 
The Way of the Spendthrift 

MISCELLANEOUS : 

The Precious Thing — The Educational Film — The Movie 
Cookstove — "Fire the Cook" — Animated Nature Films- 
Charlie Chaplin— Overheard at the Movies— Telling About 
the Picture— The Humor Test— An Impressionistic View. 



$122 a year 



Number 353 



lOe a copy 




PASSED BY 



THE BOARD 



OF CENSORS 



Jajhes ma»rr<romEfty TiAM 



T 



Flash Backs 

Some News Nuggets and Critical Quips 



HE only time Doug Fairbanks is unhappy is when 
someone calls him "Mister" Fairbanks. 



It is easier for Ben Turpin to cross his eyes 
than it is for Hughie Mack to cross his legs. 

Al St. John, "Fatty" Arbuckle's side-kick, is so tick- 
lish that he doesn't dare to dance. Says the floor tickles 
his feet. 

Doris Kenyon says the strenuous exercise in making a 
serial renders one as hard as nails. Yaas — and then the 
director drives 'em ! 

Nature equalizes all joys and woes. Cincinnati, the 
town that never had a good baseball team, is the birthplace 
of Marguerite Clark. 

A new picture is to be called "Moonlight Through the 
Rafters. ' ' May we suggest that the rafters are supported 
by the beams of the moon? 

The Answer Man says Antonio Moreno was born in 
Spain and has an olive complexion. Which is about as 
odd as a man born in Ireland having a brogue. 

A critic says Ann Little rides like a boy and wears 
trousers like a boy. We don't quite get the last part of 
that. The only way a boy wears trousers is — out. 

No, dear reader, Wallace ReidVThe Thing We Love" 
has nothing to do with your old friend, Mazuma. Never 
take a title seriously — the producers may be kidding you ! 

The prize for the best trained husband goes to Charlie 
Murray. Twice a day, whether at the studio or on loca- 
tion, he 'phones to wifie. That's keeping tabs on 'em, 
girls ! 

The most beautiful woman in the world has been 
sighted. She is a screen actress. Her name? Oh, you'll 
have to guess. Six different companies claim to have 
made the discovery. 

Polly Moran's right arm is three inches larger in cir- 
cumference than her left. She says it is caused from lasso 
practice. "Over-development from carrying her pay en- 
velope!" says Mack Sennett, and he ought to know. 

It looked for a time like "Hobbs in a Hurry," the new 
William Russell production, might have to be changed to 
' ' Playing Hobb, ' ' for three members of the company and 
Russell himself were injured in the taking of the scenes. 

It is seldom that author and director can remain in per- 
fect harmony during the making of a picture. But Harold 
Lockwood's "Broadway Bill" was produced without a sin- 
gle clash of temperaments. The director was also the 
author. 

Dorothy "Dimples" Dalton had a perfectly dreadful 
time over her love letters in the play with that title. It 
should be a warning to us girls, but — oh, shucks ! As long 
as the earth contains lovers and writing material, there will 
be love letters. And we all like to writem and gettum! 

Motion Pictures is the first magazine that ever offered a 
prize for the most foolish question. We think the judges 
were right in awarding the $10 to Frank Dill, of Salt Creek, 



Wyo., for this: "If, through war economy, pants are to be 
shortened, I would like to know at which end and how 
much." 

Robert McKim bet Charlie Ray he could take Charlie's 
car apart and put it together. He took it apart and put it 
together — in a pile, thereby winning the wager on a tech- 
nicality. It required the services of six auto experts three 
days to reassemble the mile-eater, AND Charlie is "off" 
betting forever. 

The morning that Wallace MacDonald anived at the 
Triangle studio, the Culver City Bank was robbed. The 
first afternoon he visited Culver City, the post office was 
burglarized. And the day he started work at the studio, 
an "extra" was glommed for his Ingersoll. Billy Pinker- 
ton should hear of this. 

"Beauty To Let" is the latest play released by Mutual, 
starring Margarita Fischer. She slides down a pipe from 
the third story onto the first-story fire escape, thence to the 
top of a passing taxi. They'd had only a working title up 
to the time that scene was filmed, but then and there it 
won the name. 



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Harold Lloyd has made drilling a delight by this 
simple device of his own designing. 



Movies From Film Fun's Screen 



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FORTUNE 



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CALAMITY IKE 
THE PROSPECTOR 
GOES TO SEEK 
A GOLDMINE 

HE GEISHJS OUTFIT 



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A SffOT AT FORTUNE: OR, CALAMITY IKE'S RATHER SUDDEN SUCCESS 




(Editor's Note: The writer, who 
began her career with the Biograph 
Company, is well known in the mov- 
ing picture world. Her latest success 
was as star in her own striking so- 
ciological play "Charity." She 



is a keen critic and analyst of 
all that pertains to motion picture 
art, and tells the truth about those 
who are either striving for its 
downfall or working for its advance- 
ment. ) 



Linda A. Griffith 



Comments and Criticisms of a Free-Lance 



By Linda A. Griffith 

(Mrs. David W. Griffith) 



Films Rushed to Their Ruin 

THE chief reason why stage stars have failed on the 
screen is not that they were not temperamentally 
suited to the work, but because of conditions. 
Many stars have come to the movies to "do" a 
big picture in a limited number of weeks between dramatic 
productions. This compels a director to do many feet of 
film a day, and good work cannot be done under pressure. 
Neither director nor star has time to think. An actor in a 
movie, to do good work, needs to know his scenario quite as 
well as he knows his three-act play. Sometimes a scenario 
isn't even completed when the actual taking of a picture 
begins. Some producers direct scene by scene and have no 
rehearsal of the whole story for the actors before they begin 
to ' ' shoot. ' ' If the 240th scene follows the 1 7th scene in the 
taking of a picture, and if the actor doesn't know his story 
backward, or have at least a script of his own to which he 
can refer, how can he do good work? If the 18th scene be 
taken a week after the 17th scene, and the actor has worked 
in 200 scenes in the interim, and time isn't taken to explain, 
it can easily be seen how smooth, finished, intelligent work 
is impossible. Inexperienced young directors who haven't 
much knowledge of the drama and whose experience is 
mostly along the technical end of the movies, when given 
a big star from the dramatic stage to direct, are sometimes 
quite overawed and hesitate to give the necessary direction 
to the "star," even when they see that the idea of a scene 
is all wrong. These directors imagine the star to be "up 
stage." They expect he carries a chip on his shoulder 
when he carries nothing of the sort, and is in reality quite 
a democratic person. Some stage stars never could suc- 
ceed as screen actors, but a number of splendid actors from 



the stage can point their failure in the cinema to improper 
handling, non-suitable stories and bad direction. 

Charles Chaplin has made good in the movies! His 
previous training seems to have been confined to playing 
an acrobatic drunk in a box on the stage in a sketch known 
here as "A Night in an English Music Hall," but in Eng- 
land called "The Muming Birds." He was very good in 
it. He began humbly in the movies, playing extras and 
bits, but he made the one affiliation that started him on 
the right road, and that was "Keystone" and Mack Sen- 
nett. E. H. Sothern, always a better director than actor 
on the stage, failed miserably in pictures. I recall the 
deep, fifty-foot sets in which he was allowed to slowly walk 
the whole fifty feet to the foreground. Let a director do 
that to the biggest movie star, and the people would soon 
get tired and say: "Isn't he pokey? Why doesn't he get a 
move on?" I rather think Sothern tried to take his movie 
work seriously, but he had an entirely wrong conception of 
the movies, and possibly there was no one to put him right. 
Possibly he couldn't, possibly he wouldn't take direction. 
Sir John Hare, in "Caste," cinemaed in England, showed 
wretched direction. The producers weren't even camera- 
wise. However, with everything against him, his wonder- 
ful finesse told as well on the screen as on the stage. 

Of the great actresses of the stage, Miss Cram names 
as having failed in the movies Mrs. Fiske, Ethel Barry- 
more, Laura Hope Crews, Emily Stevens and Viola Allen. 
Most emphatically Mrs. Fiske failed in the movies. Could 
anyone with an ounce of intelligence expect Mrs. Fiske not 
to fail? In the first place, she is too old. Her directors, 
fearing this, kept her eighteen feet in the background, and 
in "Tess of the D'Urberville" this was so marked that one 




PARAMOUttT-ARBUCKLE 



Many things that the public doesn't know about chefs 

are disclosed by Fatty Arbuckle in his new 

comedy, "The Cook." 

couldn't tell which one of the village maidens Mrs. Fiske 
was. These little "fliers" into screenland by stage stars 
are generally a case of easy money for both star and pro- 
ducers. The producers rely solely upon "name." Does 
anyone imagine, if Geraldine Farrar were really "Katie 
Jones," that nearly all the critics in the New York papers 
would have raved over her "Joan the Woman"? She was 
physically, mentally and spiritually as fit for the part as 
Mae Marsh is to interpret Lady Macbeth. Neither Ethel 
Barrymore nor Emily Stevens is considered a failure by 
the public or producers. But there are many who do not 
care for them. Miss Barrymore's face loses its womanly 
expression and becomes hard. She is too mature for the 
screen, and the absence of her melodious voice in the 
movies annoys anyone who has heard it on the stage. 
Emily Stevens, one of the most charming and clever stage 
stars, falls far short of filling, in screenland, the position 
she occupies on the stage. She plays emotional parts in 
the movies and has an unpleasant way of distorting her 
features to express emotion. She is infinitely more attract- 
ive on the stage. Her screen failure along artistic lines is 



possibly compensated for by the material things the movies 
have brought her, such as a motor car, summer home in 
the Adirondacks and a sumptuously furnished New York 
apartment. Viola Allen fails for the same reason Mrs. 
Fiske does, although as a stage star she never approximated 
Mrs. Fiske. Laura Hope Crews's attractive personality is 
not of the quality that transfers itself to the screen, and 
she also photographs a bit too matronly. Of the famous 
operatic trio, Mary Garden, Geraldine Farrar and Lina 
Cavalieri, I do not consider any one of them a successful 




Something new in girlish coquetry is inspired by 
Douglas Fairbanks in "Bound in Morocco." 
From meeting to marriage in twenty minutes, a 
new high speed record in Fairbanks's love making. 



movie star. Geraldine Farrar, however, seems willing to 
contribute "acting" if the scenario call for it. Lina C. 
and Mary G. simply refuse. Cavalieri isn't capable of 
dramatic expression, but the world knows that Mary Gar- 
den can act all over the place if she wants to. Possibly 
she didn't like her director, and possibly working in the 
movies appealed to her as unintelligent and uninteresting. 
The flashing short scenes in movie plays do not easily en- 
able an actress to reach emotional climaxes. 

Mabel Taliaferro, a charming young actress on the 
stage, pretty and with a sweet personality, loses these at- 
tributes in the movies. Her physical make-up is too frag- 
ile and her features too small for the screen to "get." 
Among those who have succeeded equally well on both 
screen and stage might be mentioned Elsie Ferguson, Jane 
Cowl, Pauline Frederick, Billie Burke, Bessie Barriscale 
and Nazimova. The last made a tremendous success in 
the screen version of ' ' War Brides. ' ' She packed even the 
smallest nickel theater on the East Side. But she certainly 
wasn't very beautiful to look at. She suffered too obvi- 
ously. That, however, she should be able to overcome in 
future screen work. 

Quality, Not Quantity 

S. L. Rothapfel, in his weekly program of the Rialto 
and Rivoli theaters, contributes a page giving his views of 
the motion picture proposition. He points many truths in 
these little talks. One of his beliefs, which, I hope, will 
soon come to pass, is that the movie, in some not far 
distant day, will cease to be referred to by the number of 
reels it contains. It, however, is not the director's fault 
that a story containing material for only one reel is so 
often dragged out into five. That is nearly always a result 
of orders from headquarters. I have often worked in such 
pictures and have - heard the bewildered director exclaim: 
"How in the world do they ever expect me to get five reels 
out of this story?" In order to get the necessary five reels 
he must pad, use many sub-titles, give meaningless en- 
trances and exits to the actors, introduce playful kittens 
and one thing or another. A director should be given a 
story and told to make it into a one-, two-, three- or five- 
reel movie, as the idea or plot of the story warrants. I 
agree entirely with Mr. Rothapfel when he says: "No 
amount of settings, lighting effects and wild activity can 



make it worth while to string out a picture beyond the 
point justified by the story, and the day when the exhibitor 
advertises 'ten reels for a dime' is about over." 

X-ray Movies 

Now comes the X-ray movies. Dr. E. L. Crusius, of 
the New York X-ray Laboratories, has announced that, in 
co-operation with the Universal Film Company, he has 
perfected a system for taking X-ray moving pictures, which 
are expected to be of great service in treating injuries to 
the joints. Among the pictures taken thus far are illustra- 
tions of the movements of the knee, ankle and elbow. Dr. 
Crusius says that the photographs show not only the bones, 
but the muscles, and that by moving a joint that has been 
injured and photographing the action of muscles and move- 
ments of bones, it will be possible to find out just what 
parts have been injured and the treatment required. 

Artless Art 

David Belasco, in a recent Munsey, writes interestingly 
on the motion picture in an article entitled, "The Movies 
— My Profession's Flickering Bogy." Mr. Belasco says 
some very nice things about the movies and some that are 
not so nice. He draws, as a result of his evident sincere 
interest in and study of the motion picture, some true con- 
clusions. He states the methods he would employ were he 
to direct a motion picture play. Much has been written 
about the competition between the spoken drama and the 




PARAMOUNT 



Fred Stone making a flying start in his first photoplay, "Under the Top." Fairbanks, and Russell, and 

Bill Hart should worry; it would require more stars than will ever qualify for these 

parts to satisfy the fans who follow athletic idols. 











PARAMOUNT-SENNETT 



This is one of a bevy of models in the fashion show with which ' ' Ladies First ' ' opens. A dancer, a 
diving girl, and others, assist the rapid action, and the antics of the audience are a con- 
tributing factor in a tornado of fun that ends as it ought. 



movie. This competition, Mr. Belasco says, is not a new 
experience, for the theater, as far back as the Greek and 
Roman drama, had competition in the form of sports and 
pageantry of the arena. Of all the articles that have been 
written about the motion picture, what it has done, is 
doing and is to do, none have been less intelligent than 
those written by over-ambitious movieites telling how the 
movies are eventually to take the place of drama, that 
there will be no more plays, only movies, movies, movies! 
Mr. Belasco aptly and truthfully says: "There is no such 
thing as a menace to the spoken drama when it is actually 
worthy of attention." No, there is ample room for both 
when both are worthy of attention. Mr. Belasco pays a 
high tribute to the movies for their wonderful educational 
value. But movie producers are not ambitious along edu- 
cational lines. Somehow they like the story-telling part 
and enjoy a would-be rivalry wilh the stage. In this re- 
spect Mr. Belasco says: "From their very outset, except 
when they have been devoted to reproducing scenes from 
nature, motion pictures have been a parasite feeding upon 
the arts of the theater. Far from attempting to invent 
their own medium of expression, they have been content 
to either imitate or to borrow." But, then, what art does 
not borrow? 



To "Register" Success They Must Rehearse 

As to studio acting, Mr. Belasco evidently has been un- 
fortunate in the studios he has visited. In the crude, early 
days at the old Biograph, movies were rehearsed scene by 
scene, from the beginning to the end of the story. Some- 
times two or three days were spent in rehearsing a two- 
reel picture. I never worked in a motion picture — and I 
have worked in several hundred — that was not carefully 
rehearsed before the first click of the camera was heard. I 
never had a motion picture director tell me to assume, as 
Mr. Belasco says, "the appearance and pose of thinking." 
The actor, he thinks, knows whether his mother has just 
died, his father been elected President or his sweetheart 
has promised to marry him. In order to get ten feet of an 
actor thinking, two hundred feet comprising several previ- 
ous scenes are rehearsed, so that the "thinking scene" is 
the direct result of the immediately preceding mental or 
emotional condition. I have always been given not only 
intelligent lines, but worked on as exact a cue as ever I 
had in rehearsals or performances during my short experi- 
ence on the stage. Scenes in a movie are built up to and 
climaxes reached in very much the same way they are on 
the stage. I have seen many movies in the taking that 
(.Continued in advertising section) 




EVERYBODY GOES TO THE MOVIES AT YAPP'S CROSSING 




-— -rrr-TT.' I iicS=S3fc^ mi ,^ 



Motion Pictures 
Follow the Flag 

By Jessie Niles Burness 



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I i ilinllllllllll" 11 " 



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I'RKSS ILLUSTRATING SERVIfE 



Mrs. Edith D. Foster editing films in her workshop 



ONE of the modern visionaries is Warren Dunham 
Foster, president of the Community Motion Pic- 
ture Bureau, which is the concern which supplies 
the nine million feet of film required each week 
in America, and about two million feet a week used in for- 
eign territory, by the Y. M. C. A. War Work Council and 
the Committee on Training Camp Activities. 

Another of the visionaries is E. D. Foster, editor, who 
passes upon every foot of film required 
to meet this enormous demand. The 
"E" stands for Edith, and her rela- 
tionship to the president of the com- 
pany brought to mind a belief Robert 
Ingersoll always insisted upon — that 
' ' great men always have great 
mothers." You will like this story 
better if I tell it in her own language. 
It is matter for regret that the printed 
word can convey no adequate picture 
of her gracious personality and the 
enthusiasm that animates her. In an- 
swer to our questions she said : 

"The bureau was in existence when 
the war broke out, doing its own work 
helping communities solve their prob- 
lems looking to social betterment. It 
has always realized the value of films 



in teaching the thing that 
was needed, and when the 
United States became in- 
volved in the trouble on the 
border, we found that for 
lack of what you might call 
'centralized control,' we were 
able to do but little good. 

"And so, when war was 
declared, knowing we had the 
material at hand and were in 
full command of everything 
that was needed, although 
now, as then, all we have to 
sell is service and system, we 
sought a systematic distribu- 
tion. We were ready. That 
is the reason our accomplish- 
ment seems wonderful. War 
was declared on the 6th of 
April; on the 15th of May 
following, our contract with the Y. M. C. A. War Work 
Council and the Committee on Training Camp Activities 
was entered into, and on May 29th we began work. The 
system has not been changed at all — only enlarged. 

"We do not judge pictures by a preconceived formula. 
The first thing one of our reviewers has to learn is to look 
at pictures as the men will look at them, and that all kinds 
of men, from all sections of the country, will so look. 




PRESS ILLUSTRATING SIRVICE 



This hut at Chickamauga is "duped" in every camp and contonment, here 
and abroad, where Y. M. C. A. War Work is done. 



About the only thing we are ruthless with in reviewing is 
what we call 'sex stuff' ; that has no proper place anywhere. 
The camps are supposed to be shown each week one com- 
edy, one all-man picture and one one-girl love story. By 
'all-man' we mean such stories as Hart or Fairbanks or 
Russell puts on, that appeal to the love of sport and life in 
the open. 

"The 'one-girl' story has the straightforward appeal to 
the romantic; we are a bit severe on the 'eternal triangle' 
idea. Then we have our own 'topical' — a two-thousand- 
foot reel — called 'The World To-day.' This is culled from 
all sources and covers in picture form all the news likely 
to interest the boys. The great effort, at first, is to keep 
the men — who have been torn away from all the things 
they are used to and the influences that have surrounded 
them — normal and happy; tore-establish their balance; to 
keep them thinking, as well as working, along wholesome 
lines. 

" We review everything issued by all producing com- 
panies. We keep two projection-rooms going all the time, 
from nine in the morning until eleven at night, and much 
of the time we have four rooms going. Besides this, our 
representatives attend all trade showings. We've forgotten 
all about 'working hours' in this establishment, and we 
don't expect to know anything about 'leisure moments' un- 
til after the war. When it came to putting pictures onto 
the transports, the whole force took hold with enthusiasm, 
even to the littlest office girl, and it was necessary for sev- 
eral of them to work day and night for several days until 
each particular job was done. 'My Four Years in Ger- 
many' and 'The Unbeliever' are on the transports now and 
were there almost as soon as the trade had them. 

"The work in this country is mostly on what we call 
the circulation basis. For foreign requirements we must 
buy films outright. When we purchase films, we pay lab- 
oratory prices. The studio cost is borne by the producer. 



We have found a disposition on the part of producers, al- 
most without exception, to supply this material at actual 
cost, just as we supply the service without profit. So far 
as the war service goes, it is our bit. The Young Men's 
Christian Association pays the actual cash outlay ; no more. 

"Of course, it is necessary to be very systematic, and 
we are. Everything we have ever reviewed we have here 
accurately catalogued. Every week a statement of the ac- 
credited list — that is, films we are willing to supply— goes 
to the head of every division. The secretary fills in the 
recreation coupon which accompanies it, sends it to us here 
for record, and it is then returned to him. In this way the 
record kept here is complete for every division. Of course, 
different sections vary- slightly in their requiremenls, but 
they average up pretty much alike. Very often technical 
or educational films are asked for, and we are able to meet 
almost any requirement, for there are films on every possi- 
ble subject. If these boys want to devote their little lei- 
sure to a continuation of the studies which the war has 
interrupted — and many of them do — so that no time may 
be lost when they return, we supply the pictures and the 
Y. M. C. A. furnishes books and conducts classes. 

"One of the novelties developed has been a projecting 
machine that throws the pictures on the ceiling, so that 
prone men may watch the pictures from their hospital cots. 
Educational work is also carried on by the Young Men's 
Christian Association lecturers. 

"Quite recently we had a rush order for 125 Ameri- 
can comedies for use in Italy. We chose Drew come- 
dies, Frank Daniels, Happy Hooligan, Victor Moore come- 
dies, Billie Rhodes, Keystone, Klever, Bobbie Bumps, 
Heeza Liar, Mutt and Jeff, Katzenjammers — oh, nearly the 
whole comedy lot, including, of course, 'Fatty' and all 
the pastry profession. A worker is now translating the 
titles into Italian. To sum up, we follow our soldiers and 
strive to meet all needs of the situation." 




PRESS IM.USTEATINfi SFRVITF 



This picture, taken at Camp Bowie, Texas, shows how the silver sheet is sometimes used out-of-doors. 

The "Wye" tries to provide for all recreation needs. Camp Dix requires nine 

huts, besides the great auditorium, headquarters. 




Fit your film lovers 

with your favorite 

" location. ' ' ■ 



The Call of the Quill 

The latter-day porter is through with his porting; 

The brakeman refuses to brake ; 
The old court attendant is through with his courting; 

The fakir refuses to fake. 
No more does the erstwhile professional dancer 

Attend us with breakdown and bow ; 
And this is the final and consummate answer — 

They're writing scenarios now. 

No more does the tramp hit the highways and byways ; 

The peddler refuses to ped. 
These gallant Lotharios now write scenarios 

To garner their few crumbs of bread. 
The traveling salesman has shortened his season; 

The farmer abandons his cow. 
The plumber's stopped plumbing— and this is the reason- 

They're writing scenarios now. 

The call of the movies has reached to all corners — 

Society's fathomless niche — 
To steeplejacks, truckmen, professional mourners — 

The humble as well as the rich — 
My relatives, servants, my gossipy neighbor — 

The merchant, the man with the plow. 
(You query the cause of the shortage of labor? ) 

They're writing scenarios now.— Howard Diets. 



Golf, yachting, indoor 

sport or out, it's all 

one to them. 



in u mini i l.miimiiimiiiiiiumiiaill 



Cruelty to Actors 



"Your only applause," quoth a star of the movies, "is 
the click of the camera." Obviously, an instance of cruelty 
to actors. Invention should come to the rescue and equip 
every movie studio with an applause machine, consisting 
of a pair of cast-iron hands and an endless string of per- 
cussion caps. 

Shocking 

"The board of censors threatens to close up the place." 

"What's wrong?" 

"Just as the hero was kissing his sweetheart, the film 
stopped and held them in that position for over ten 
minutes." 

The Idea! 

The movie shows appeal to me; 

They're very pleasant, but 
I must confess I'd love to see 

The parts the censors cut ! 

Anyone not desiring to quote a film star as saying, "It 
is all hard work, but I love it," has our permission. 




Film Fun 

EDITORIALS 




Civic Improvement and the Films 

THE initial step in the right direction was taken 
recently, when one of the larger film producing 
companies placed on file with the municipal 
reference library of New York City data con- 
cerning pictures to be used in civic betterment. Munici- 
palities throughout the country keep in close touch, and 
each is keen to lead in these forward movements, nearly 
every one of which for the past three years has taken form 
in a film or gained great impetus therefrom. "What we 
are doing to help win the war" is just now a topic of ab- 
sorbing interest throughout the country and to the million 
of our boys "over there." Many films picturing many 
undertakings in different localities are being made. If all 
producers would file full information regarding their films 
of this class, New York would soon have a system estab- 
lished that would be of enormous value not alone to our- 
selves now, but to our allies in the devastated countries 
after the war. It is worth careful consideration. 

The Critic and the Movies 

IN an article in a current magazine, captioned " Dra- 
matic Criticism in the American Press, ' ' James S. Met- 
calfe says some things that should be of interest not 
only to every dramatic critic, but to the layman as well. 

The decline and fall of the dramatic critic and his dis- 
appearance from modern journalism is a cause for regret 
to every true lover of the drama. But as in the days gone 
by there were such things in the daily papers as intelligent 
reviews of plays by writers who had the necessary qualifi- 
cations, the "education, experience, the needed judicial 
temperament and the writing ability," as Mr. Metcalfe 
puts it, there is at least hope that the time will again come 
when commercialism will not be the ruling factor in the 
criticism of plays. 

As deeply as the present state of affairs in the relation 
of the newspaper to the theater is to be regretted, what 
about the deplorable condition that exists in a similar 
capacity between the motion picture and the newspapers? 
Where a theatrical manager might use six inches of space 
for advertising his play, a motion picture corporation takes 
sometimes a half page or more for the announcement of its 
attraction. How, in the face of such huge sums as there- 
by fill the coffers of a paper, can truthful criticisms be 
expected? 

A business house advertises its line of goods, perhaps a 
sale of hats or shoes or gloves. One doesn't read the next 
day in another part of the paper an item stating that this 
firm's "hats or gloves or shoes" were of very poor style or 
quality and worth half the price paid by the people who 
bought them. If they accept so freely of your money, they 



must say either nothing or good things about your wares. 
But what's to be done about the reviews of motion pic- 
tures? Bought and paid fer most of them certainly are — 
paid for not only by advertising, but by entertainment to 
the critics as well. As all the world goes to the movies, 
the highly educated and the illiterate alike, it is high time 
there was such a thing as serious, intelligent reviews writ- 
ten about them. As yet the public can hardly be trusted 
in the matter of judging the movies. If there are to be 
better movies, the desire for them will be created in part 
by reviews of them written by those who know something 
of what they are writing about and published by papers and 
magazines that are not in the market except at their sub- 
scription price. 




Ruth Stonehouse likes this role better than any other of 
the dozen she has played this year. 



The Homing of Packsaddle Pete 

A Tale of a Town in the Moving- Picture West 
By Arthur Chapman 



IT was night in Foothill. The little settlement at the 
feet of the Rockies smiled up at the great, snow- 
capped peaks, and the peaks smiled back, in turn, 
winking and blinking good-naturedly in the pale 
moonlight of early evening. 

Not that Foothill had much to smile about, for, until a 
moving picture outfit established its Western headquarters 
there, times had been hard — very hard. The big mines 
were played out, and the field had been abandoned by pros- 
pectors as hopeless, so far as anything more was concerned. 
The stock business had not prospered, and, to make it short, 
Foothill was in the dumps. 

The moving picture business had given employment to 
the most picturesque characters of the place. Wild West 
dramas were staged with clock-like regularity in the streets 
of Foothill and on the sides of the precipitous mountains 
that formed an awe-inspiring background. The hangers-on 
of the Foothill saloons received enough, for acting as 
' ' supers, ' ' to keep them in drinks. They posed as the pas- 
sengers in the stage hold-ups or as the mob in the lynching 
scenes which were great favorites with the scenario writ- 
ers. When there was a "chase" scene staged, which usu- 
ally consisted of a long, hard run after a horse thief, those 
of the Foothillers who could ride were paid extra money 
for the pounding they received in the saddle. 

Under such circumstances, it was not long until some 
of the town residents acquired all the conceits and whims 
of Broadway stars. Old Mrs. Demaree, who had done the 
camp's washing from the time the first big strike was made 
in the Mollie B., had been featured to such an extent as 
the weeping mother of erring miner sons that she was ac- 
cumulating a considerable bank account and had told Foot- 
hill to send its laundry to Denver — or farther. Mike 
O'Shaughnessy, the town good-for-naught, who lived in a 
tiny cabin on the deserted Unca property, was in great de- 
mand for "father" roles. Mike had a venerable beard 
that whitened his vest to the lower button of that garment, 
and when he clasped' to his heart an ingenue in a"M'liss" 
make-up, the film men fairly jumped for joy, as they knew 
Mike was getting over the stuff that would bring tears to 
the eyes of the impressionable patrons of the moving pic- 
ture shows. 

So, on this night, Foothill was celebrating — not hilari- 
ously as of old, when the big mines were running full blast, 
but quietly as became a Center of Thespian Art. But sud- 
denly the town actors congregated at Poker Bill's laid down 
their cards and set down their glasses. A loud halloo had 
been heard in the distance. 

"I know that yell," said Mike O'Shaughnessy. "'Tis 
old Packsaddle Pete comin' in from his usual season of un- 
successful prospectin'. Why Pete persists in follerin' that 
game, at the heels of a ragged and moth-eaten burro, when 
he could make more money and assimilate a lot more gen- 
tility by actin' for the millions like me, is more than I can 
understhand. " 



"Pete'd make a grand actor in prospectin' roles," said 
another of the Foothill Dramatic Society. 

' ' He sure looks the part, ' ' agreed another feuper. ' ' Git 
him 'n' that frazzled burro in front of a picture machine, 
and the operator'd go gibberin' mad fer joy." 

"But he has no soul for art, " said Mike disgustedly. 
"He's turned down a dozen opporthunities to win fame as 
an actor, all on account of this prospectin' bug that's 
buzzin' beneath his hat. He'll be comin' in and tellin' us 
how he's had to quit diggin' when he was not more than 
four feet away from the mother lode, and how he's goin' 
back next spring and uncover a mine that'll enable him to 
buy the hull movin' picture business, with us stars throwed 
in as furniture." 

There was a rattling of frying pans and other accouter- 
ment outside as Packsaddle Pete hitched his tattered burro. 
Nobody was sufficiently interested in Pete's coming to go 
out and help him fasten his faithful traveling companion. 
Few looked up when Pete himself burst into the door — a 
great, sunburnt giant of a man, well in his sixties, but 
hardy as one just turned forty. 

"Come up here, you bum actors — you passel of baskers 
in the eye of the camery!" shouted Pete, in a voice that 
re-echoed in the room. "Come up here and have some- 
thing on me and listen to what Packsaddle Pete's got 
to tell you about the biggest mine that's ever been 
struck." 

"Ah, yes, Pete, me deah boy," said Mike O'Shaugh- 
nessy, laying down a moving picture magazine in which 
his portrait appeared. "We know all about it, old top. 
Another one of them mines ye're goin' back after next 
spring, ain't it?" 

"Not much, you pitiful slave to the camery shutter ! " 
boomed Pete, throwing a buckskin sack on the bar. "I've 
struck her this time. I've got her all staked and branded, 
and the monuments all up in my name. And I've staked 
out neighboring claims — all the law allows — for my kin 
and my real friends." 

At this Foothill sat up and looked at Pete in amazement. 

"This here looks true," said the barkeep, pouring a 
stream of shining gold on the bar. "Pete, you've never 
brung anything like this in here before. Where'd you find 
it? Let us in on it — that's a good old Petey. We alius 
liked you — you know we did." 

"Yes, you campful of celluloid film spoilers!" said 
Pete scornfully. "You alius liked me well enough to make 
fun of me and peg stones at my burro that's standin' out- 
side. But, let me tell you, that animal's goin' to have 
gold shoes and a chiropodist and a masseur and a tonsorial 
attendant, while you camery supernumeraries are goin' 
around beggin' the price of a shave. But I'll tell you 
where I found it. That's what I came in here for to-night, 
because the story's too good to keep." 

"Where is it?" rose the chorus. ' 

"Easy now," cautioned Pete. "You remember you 



fellers was all actin' the mob in that scene up on the 
Devil's Slide to-day?" 

"Yes," said Mike O'Shaughnessy. "It was one of the 
grandest plays in which I have been featured. It was 
called 'The Turn of Fortune,' and represented an aged 
miner, the same bein* me, lost in the hills wid his daugh- 
ter. He digs fer wather and strikes a spring and a gold 
mine at the same time. The operator said my manner of 
discoverin' the gold was very realistic. The boys here was 
the crowd that come and rescued us from Injuns a little 
later. But that's immaterial. Go on wid your story. " 

"Yes, your actin' when you made that discovery was 
realistic, all right," said Pete. "I had just come down 
over the trail from the hilltop when I seen all of your fool- 
ishness. I and my burro was some tired, anyway, and we 
sat down to see your play. I seen the hull thing acted out, 
and it was all my burro could do to keep from hee-hawin' 
when Mike clasped his faintin' daughter with one arm and 
dug up the gold with the other." 

"Leave out the dramatic criticism," said Mike stiffly, 
' ' and go on with your story. ' ' 

"Well, the criticism's. part of it all," said Pete. "If 
your actin' hadn't been so different from what a man really 
does when he strikes gold, I'd have gone on without payin' 
any attention. But I thought I'd go down and see what 
you had been actin' so plum loony about. It's jest force 
of habit, you know. I can't go past any rock without 
seein' what's in it." 

"Proceed," said Mike, beginning to whiten about the 
mouth. 

"Well, I saw that you really had uncovered somethin' 
that looked like a vein. I scraped it off some more, and 
then pounded up some of the rock and panned it. Here's 
the gold I got out of a shovelful." 

"What!" yelled Mike. "You don't mean to say that I 
was diggin' on a real gold vein when I was actin' out all 
that foolishness in front of the camery!" 

"You uncovered a vein ten feet wide and a million feet 
deep and loaded with gold at the grass roots," said Pete. 



"That there side hill we've looked on as barren is thexich- 
est mountain in this hull range." 

There was a sound like thunder as the population of 
Foothill broke for the door and struggled to get out. Had 
the camera man been on hand, he could have secured a 
picture of a real gold stampede. But Mike the actor was 
too far overcome to join the rush. His head sagged until 
it rested on the bar. 

"Brace up, Mike," said Pete, shaking him. "I've a 
great consolation for you." 

"What is it?" asked Mike hopefully. 

"I've named the mine for you," said Packsaddle Pete. 
"It's goin' to be called the 'Movin' Picture Mike' !" 

Scenarios We All Could Write 

The Irish Play — In which the brave young Irish laddie 
is persecuted by English soldiers in red coats. 

The Inventor's Play — In which the old inventor's pat- 
ent is stolen by a wealthy scoundrel, and the hero finally 
brings the rascal to justice. 

The War Drama— In which two brothers love the same 
girl and enlist on opposing sides. One proves himself a 
coward and the other a hero. The hero gets the girl. 

The Indian Play — In which the white girl falls in love 
with a dark-eyed young man, who turns out to be an In- 
dian. They part with many tears and much elocution, at 
the summit of a high ridge, with the sun setting sadly in 
the background. 

The Thief Play — In which the hero is a successful soci- 
ety thief, but decides to give up this means of livelihood 
for the girl he loves. 

The Crook Play — In which all of the hopeless charac- 
ters are killed or commit suicide at the last. 




THE " PUPMOBILE " 
In which the youngest member of the cast in ' ' Her Screen Idol ' ' rides into the pictures. 




OOLDWVN 



A One-Reel Thriller 

With Madge Kennedy as the Star 



1\ /TAID, and man, and a swirling stream. 

*-'■*■ Perils of Screendom trifling seem 
Paired with the dangers here portrayed. 
Whether to jump, or whether to wade — 
Desperate plight for a summer maid. 



Villain's part by the stream is played; 
Hear it laugh at the man and maid ! 

Deep in its depths is a wicked gleam; 

Oh, what a hateful, horrible stream ! 

"You are my prisoner, girl !" A scream. 



#1 



Rescue role is the man's to play 
(All in the work of a summers day); 
Faltering feet, an outstretched hand; 
Guidance, caution, and command — 
Eyes that meet — and understand. 



P> 



-A. H. F. 



Her Career 

By Walt Mason 



MAE JUDITH SIMPSON was a peach and entertain- 
ing in her speech. A dozen youths, at divers 
times, when with her, talked of wedding chimes 
and said they'd gladly blow a plunk for orange wreaths 
and kindred junk. 

"Come to the parson with me, please," they used to 
say, on bended knees, "and let that learned and pious gun 
pronounce the words that make us one." 

But Judith shooed them all away. "No vows for me," 
she used to say. "I am a strictly modern maid, and old 
ideas seem decayed. The old-time damsel's end and aim 
was just to play the marriage game, and when she had a 
husband roped, she'd gathered all for which she hoped. 
And then, content to drudge and slave, she went house- 
keeping to the grave; for every cent she had to beg and 



pull her lord and master's leg. I am an independent lass, 
and I will cut my share of grass; I'll do my little work 
alone and have the profit for mine own." 

Mae Judith Simpson was no fool ; she beat the other 
girls at school and won so many prizes there, the teachers 
used to gasp and stare. And when the schoolhouse she 
forsook, she sat right down and wrote a book that made 
the critics wag their ears, and rival authors sprinkle tears. 
The lecture platform then she held and in the Bryan line 
excelled; then started in, with noble rage, to try to elevate 
the stage. Whatever Judith Simpson did, it placed new 
feathers in her lid. Success was ever at her heels; she 
garnered fame and silver wheels. 

The years rolled on, and Mae grew old; and sometimes, 
(Continued in advertising section) 



An Impressionistic View 




The Englishman sees something of America, as he imagined it. 




But what must he have thought of this ? 




And wasn't his idea verified by this ? 




And here really was more of the same kind of life. 




But it was only a company working for the "movies," after all. 




f^ P*)t_u3B_J 



FIGURATIVELY SPEAKING 
"John, dear, I'm to be in the amateur movies. What 

would folks say if I should appear in tights ?" 

"They would probably say that I married you for 

your money. ' ' 



The Precious Thing 

it J KNOW you— William S. Tart!" 

X The words snapped like a ginger snap. The 

Woman faced her relentless pursuer where he leaned 
insolently against the mantelpiece. He smiled with mad- 
dening calmness as he lit a perfection. 

"And why not, pray?" he asked good-naturedly. 
"Have we not been married these six years?" 

"Oh, you know I don't mean it that way!" she flung 
back. "You can't kid me! You — piker!" 

The Man wilted like a wet cruller. 

The Woman continued her protest, fighting his cold 
aloofness. Cold? Yes, the furnace had flivvered. And 
what a picture she made ! Her beau- 
tiful red hair wildly awry, her complex- 
ion crimson and marred only by a vivid 
smudge of ink on her cheek. She was a 
perfect 56. 

"Yeh," The Woman went on, her 
splendid voice now thundering, now 
squeaking. "You would have me stop 
and give It up after months of effort. 
Give It up! No! No! Nnnnnnnno!" 

She turned dramatically to where 
It lay on the camouflage-mahogany table. 
Impartial, unaccusative, dumb, It lay 
there while these two fought out a des- 
tiny. So still, so white, so helpless ! 

"Dam!" His elbow had slipped off 
the mantelpiece. 

The Man tossed his butt to the 
grateful rubber plant and reeled over to 
her. "Wife," he exclaimed, vainly en- 
deavoring to make his eyes focus on 
hers, "I shall not leave this room until 
It is settled, once and for all!" His 
words cut like an ice pick. "Would 
you bankrupt me? Quit It! Quit It 
now ! So there ! ' ' 

He staggered back to the mantel. 



The Woman stared like a caught fish. "Then — then, 
you insist, you are determined?" she queried. 

"Posilutely — I mean, absotively!" 

"There is no recourse? It is the end?" 

"Sure!" 

Broken, The Woman again turned to It and stared at It 
for a full minute, more or less. She slipped into a chair 
and sobbed, her shoulder blades quivering. "You ask this 
now, " she cried, " after so long ! Oh,Icahn't! Icahn't!" 

The Man stepped to the table and picked It up and 
flung It into the fireplace. The flames seized It madly. 
In an instant It was no more, finished, ended. Good-night. 

"Oh, how couldjoo! How couldjoo!" 

Then — The Man's reserve slipped from him like an old 
union suit. His face softening, as if it had been well 
punched, he went to her side. 

"Margaret — Gertie," he begged, "buck up!" He 
pounded her shoulders tenderly. "It's finished now — let's 
quit. You've spent a month's salary for stamps, and the 
postal authorities complained that you clogged the mails. 
You can't sell that scenario. It's rotten. Come on; let's 
go to a movie." 

She did. They did. —Arthur C. Brooks. 

"Incidental Music" 

(By incidental music meaning the inevitable piano at the 
small-town movie) 

For the pathetic parts Slam Bang Music 

For the funny parts Bing Bang Music 

For the intensely exciting parts. .Zip Bang Music 
For the quiet, domestic scenes. , .Slap Bang Music 

For the love scenes Crash Bang Music 

For the tragic moments Zing Bang Music 

For any and all other scenes Bang Bang Music 




THEY 1 RE ALL DOING IT 

'' Never mind, Hortense, just you wait till I've sold that 
scenario I'm writing. ' ' 




WHERE IS THE WEST OF THE SCREEN ? 

Mr. Washington Square, after thoroughly imbibing the western spirit from films by Bill Hart, et al., 

decides to mingle with the greasers, half-breeds, squaws, and cow punchers of the west. This shows 

his arrival' in Copperopolis, formerly Squaw City, Montana. 

The Educational Film 



THE proposition to teach by motion pictures in the 
public schools of America awakens a lively inter- 
est in the mind of the small boy. Motion pictures 
will give to lessons a zest which nothing else could impart, 
and for the benefit of prosy old educational authorities, we 
submit a boy's idea of correct scenarios for a course in 
early American history : 

Motion picture of the affair between Captain John 
Smith, Powhatan and Pocahontas. Show Captain John 
Smith captured by the Indians, brought in and bound to a 
stake. He pleads in pantomime for his life, but in vain. 
Powhatan takes a war club and lops off his head and arms 
and legs. Pocahontas rushes in, falls at her father's feet 
in a beseeching attitude and begs for Captain Smith's life. 
Powhatan relents, and Captain Smith's head, legs and arms 
reassemble, and he steps out, smiling and complete, to kiss 
Pocahontas his thanks. Pocahontas and Cap Smith do an 

Indian One-Step, and Passed by the Board of Censors. 

Motion picture of Governor Peter Stuyvesant protesting 
against the surrender of New Amsterdam. Show Governor 
Stuyvesant working himself up into a fine fury over the 
proposition that he strike his colors. Several Dutch offi- 
cers come to him, gesticulating and expostulating, and he 
shoos them off savagely with his upraised cane. At last, 
highly exasperated^ he starts in pursuit of one of them, and 
his wooden leg goes through a knothole in the floor. En- 
ter the garrison, laughing. Governor Stuyvesant, after 
trying vainly to pull loose, finally shows by signs that he 



will surrender the fort if they will only get him out of the 
knothole. They do so; after which Stuyvesant unstraps 
his wooden leg, ties to it a white flag, waves it from the 
window, and Passed by the Board of Censors. 

Motion picture of the ride of Paul Revere. Show Paul 
Revere coming lickitysplit on a motor cycle. He bumps in 
rapid succession two baby carriages, a pushcart, a fat man 
who was crossing the road, a deaf old lady, a lame man 
with a pair of crutches, and a grocer's boy with a basket 
full of eggs, which break. Show that Paul gets a punc- 
tured tire and has to stop by the roadside to make repairs. 
This gives the angry people whom he bumped time to 
catch up with him. The nurses hit him with the baby 
carriages, the pushcart peddler pelts him with bananas, 
the fat man strikes him with his cane, the dog bites him 
on the leg, the lame man breaks a crutch over him, and 
the grocer's boy jams the egg basket down upon his head. 

Paul runs to Lexington for his life, and Passed by the 

Board of Censors. 

If motion pictures in the schools are to be successful 
aids to a juvenile education, they must be like in spirit 
and treatment those which the kiddies prefer. 

Family Album Up to Date 

Lives of movie stars remind us 

We oblivion may avoid, 
And, departing, leave behind us 

Life-prints on the celluloid! 

—Robert Innis. 




SUGGESTION TO "HOLD-UP" MEN 
Use a moving picture outfit, thereby avoiding all possible chance of interference from the police. 



His Ambition 

I ain't a-goin' to be a soldier — no, 

Not even a general, though it's great to go 

To war an' kill a hundred men or so. 

An' I ain't goin' to go away out West, 
Where they is Injuns, cowboys an' the rest, 
Though I uster think that that.'ud be the best. 

Nor I sha'n't be the clown in the circus when 
They all can't ride the mule but him, an' then 
They all try to, an' get bucked off again. 

No, sir! I'm goin' to run a picture show — 
The very swellest kind they is, yo' know — 
So's, whenever they feel like it, my kids can go! 

The Movie Cook Stove 

In replying to his wife's suit for divorce, William McCutehen. a 
traveling salesman, declares his willingness to pay alimony to escape 
living with his wife, who, he alleges, neglected him for the movies. — 
Item of Court News. 

THIS is not a new type of court item. The movies 
have been blamed ere now for little lapses in house- 
keeping, so it is not surprising toTiote a further al- 
legation upon the part of the husband that "he had to get 
his own supper and wash the dishes. " Where is this thing 



to stop? Where is the movie house manager who will rise 
to the higher levels of his profession and save homes, as 
well as provide amusement and relaxation? Should a 
housekeeping woman be denied the solace and the uplift of 
the movies? No. On the other hand, should her husband 
be obliged "to get his own supper and wash the dishes"? 
Again, no. The solution obviously is a movie theater 
fitted with a number of kitchen ranges, coal or gas in- 
cluded, for the use of movie patrons who will pay a slight 
increase over the customary admission fee. To such a 
theater the housewife brings the evening dinner in its raw 
state, "puts it on," and enjoys the show while keeping one 
eye on the potatoes. She fetches her own kitchen ware, 
keeps it when not in use in a locker hired from the thea- 
ter, and takes home her husband's dinner, perfectly pre- 
pared, in a large basket provided by the management and 
leased by the month. Thus she sees the show to its last 
ultimate reel, and thus, likewise, her husband sees his din- 
ner at its regular hour. Given efficiency, the result is 
felicity. Where is the movie man big-hearted enough, 
filled with sufficient love of humanity, to strive for and to 
earn the glorious title of "The Home Saver"? Everybody 
but lawyers will wring his hand and call him blessed. 




the day is long. He decides to have one nice 
fish for breakfast. While Cookie gets ready 
the batter — and you know batter is one of the 
old standbys of a one-reel comedy — the play- 
ful cat — yes, yes, you guessed it. 

But in this millionaire's ranch there is a 
pool of real water in the conservatory, and in 
the pool some gold fish, guarantee 18 karat. 
Cookie spears one, and Mr. Grouch breakfasts 
in state and in his pajamas. 




Reel One- 

Movie Variations 

THE poor, dumb, idiotic igno- 
ramus who says movies are 
movies is more to be pitied 
than the silly fish who wears rubbers 
and carries an umbrella when the 
morning paper says "rain before 
night." 

Movies are not movies. There 
are nearly fifty -seven varieties. 
Movies are simply nickel - orgies 
They followed the era of shifting 
pictures and are almost as extinct 
as a dollar-and-a-half shore dinner. 
Next door, or at best a block away, 
there are film dramas for a dime, 
fifteen and twenty-five. Sandwiched 
in between motion pictures and 
photoplays we find the Messrs. 
Whoozis' latest success, "Much To 
Do for Nothing. " A title like that 
is too good for a movie or photo- 
play, so they call it a screen version. 
Next in order comes the cinemato- 
graph. Across the street Mr. Wisen- 
heimer advertises a cinema produc- 
tion, while the press agent for "the 
world's greatest producer" calls his 
lord and master's product a supreme 
effort and lets the public guess at 
the rest. It costs a dollar a guess 
at the box office and two bucks on 
the curb. Speculators never bother 
with ordinary movies. 

A person who expects anything 
more than plain, ordinary movies 
for a dime has no right to share the 
blessings of this world. When you 
cough up a whole bill for somebody's 
supreme effort, you're entitled to 



"Animated 

Nature" Films 

Are 

Sometimes 

Staged in 

the 

Home Circle 




Reel Three. 





"Good night!" 



variations. Variations come ffigh, 
and you've got to pay for them. 

There are all kinds of varia- 
tions. When you lean against one 
of those supreme efforts for a whole 
evening, you get more variations 
than there are bones in a spring 
shad. Variations range from beat- 
ing the tom-tom back stage, in il- 
lustrating a hulu dance, to rubbing 
sandpaper for waves on the beach. 

When the war came along, it 
brought another quota of variations, 
some of which consist of kicking a 
bass drum, with an accompanying 
smell of burned powder, or making 
a noise like a gas motor to illustrate 
the flight of an American ace over 
the enemy lines. The orchestra 
members usually concoct these 
noises, but they get a chance to loaf 
when the film unfolds a poison- gas 
scene. Somebody ought to open a 
gas jet. Small boys are strong for 
variations, but most people prefer to 
take their movies with silence. 

Conscientious admirers of the 
silent drama always check their 
home troubles with their hats. " 
Their hearts throb like a Diesel en- 
gine when the hero tucks a kiss un- 
der his sweetheart's left ear, and 
they're sure they can hear him whis- 
per words of love. But the clever 
lip reader detects his sweetheart's 
threat to wallop the big stiff on the 
mush if he steps on her foot again. 
There was talk once of movies sup- 
planting the spoken drama, but that 
was before the high cost of living. 




THE STRENUOUS LIFE 

Moving picture actor — Hurry up with that drink ! I've just been thrown over a precipice, packed in a 

trunk, shipwrecked, dropped out of a balloon, and burned at the stake, and I'm thirsty ! 



Charlie Chaplin 

By W. R. Hoefer 

I met him near a movie place, this fat man, full of 
glee. A grin was chasing o'er his face. He cackled, 
"Hee-hee-hee !" He laughed so hard I thought he'd choke, 
and said to him: "Old chap, pray tell me what's the bloom- 
ing joke that wrinkles up your map." "Oh ! Ho-ho-ho !" 
the man replied. "Ha-ha! Why, sir, I saw a film that 
made me bust my side; this Chaplin; haw-haw-haw!" 
The tears were streaming from his eye. He roared and 
shook his head. I wondered if this Chaplin guy was funny 
as he said. "I'll see this Chaplin if I can," quoth I, and 
ambled in; and soon ap- 
peared the funny man who 
makes a nation grin. His 
shoes were large, his mus- 
tache small; he swung a 
bamboo stick; and then I 
saw that wasn't all — he also 
swung a brick. His gait 
was not a walk or run; he 
moved with gliding hop. 




FUTURE FILM STARS 

Willyum Tell— Shut yer 

mouth, Mickey! It looks 

just like an apple. 



He started rows with everyone and nearly killed a cop. 
He stole another fellow's girl. He tipped his funny lid, 
and when he ran and tried to whirl, I roared to see him 
skid. He ambled gayly through the park; he robbed a 
fellow's purse. He stole a baby for a lark and kissed the 
baby's nurse. He made me smile, he made me grin, he 
made me howl and roar. My seat gave 'way amid the 
din; I rolled about the floor. A girl beside me looked 
severe, then smiled, then giggled loud. A matron snick- 
ered in my ear and joined the roaring crowd. A man be- 
hind me laughed so hard, he cracked beneath the strain. 
An usher, later, said he died of Chaplin on the brain. Oh, 

Charlie is the laughter 
king! He rules with mirth- 
ful sway. Some others pull 
the Chaplin thing, but not 
the Chaplin way. They 
ape the funny Chaplin 
gait; they try to dress the 
part; but one thing none 
can imitate is Charlie Chap- 
lin's art. 




"Blindfolded" 



TN Bessie Barriscale's Paralta play, "Blind- 
folded," she gives a delightful portrayal of 
Peggy Muldoon, a girl raised to the belief that 
no man ever gained riches honestly, and there- 
fore it is no real wrong to rob those who have 
wealth. From the pages of Emerson she learns a 
new standard of moral ethics and astounds the 




The real criminal is forced to face the man who knows. 



Peggy realizes what Emerson meant by Happy 

will that house be in which relations are 

formed from character." 




"Did yuh git th' fish fer t'morra?" 
an' th' onions?" "Yep.'' 



SATURDAY NIGHT— SMALL TOWN 
Uh-huh." " An' th' cabbage ?" 



Uh-huh." " An' th' cheese 
Well, come on: let's go to a movin' picture show." 



Overheard at the Movies 



What Mazie says to Bill— I don't think she's so awfully 
pretty, do you? It's just the way she rolls her eyes, and 
anybody can do that. She looks something like my cousin, 
Ellabelle Blitz, and I never thought she was pretty, good- 
ness knows. I don't know what people see in these film 
stars, anyway. Lots and lots of girls off the stage have 
prettier faces, don't you think so? 

A middle-aged patron to his wife — What? Who? Oh, 
the girl in the picture ! Yes, I think she's got kind of a 
pretty face. But, say, here's what I want to know. What 
in thunder is it that keeps her dress from falling off? 
What? No, I have not any personal interest in such things. 
I'm simply asking for cold-blooded information. 

A middle-aged woman to her husband — I don't see how 
you can rave over her at all. . I used to think she was 
pretty and sweet, but ever since her husband got a divorce 
from her — I read about it in the papers last week — I'm just 
through with her. The idea of a divorced woman capering 



about with her hair down her back and playing those inno- 
cent little schoolgirl parts! It's disgusting! 

Somebody in back of you to somebody else — Oh, ain't she 
lovely ! Gee, I think she's lovely ! I think she's just the 
loveliest thing! Say, don't you think she's the loveliest 
thing? Oh, Idol Why don't you? Why don't you think 
she's lovely? I always come when she's here. Gee, I 
don't see how you can say she ain't lovely ! Just look at 
her in that scene now. Honest, I don't see how you can 
say she ain't lovely! Gee, I wish we could go round to the 
stage door and wait for 'em to come out, the way we uster 
in the stock companies. I think she's lovely. {Continues 
indefinitely. ) 

Every girl to herself— Betcha I could do as good as she 
does, 'f I had the chance. 

What Ed says to Bill — Some kiddo, ain't she, Bill? You 
said it! 

Lizzie, 37, to Emma, 39 — I think she has a wry ordinary 
figure ! 




"Three or four oj you kids can come in now. 



^WtCAH-^^ 



o 



Telling About the Picture 

( You can supply the essential words yourself; probably you 
have heard them often) 
k. H, I enjoyed it ever so much ! Really, it was 
one of the best movies I ever saw. You see, 

the story was about a and a 

Willie, if you don't stop wriggling in 
your chair, mamma will send you away from the table ! 
Yes, I mean it. Well, this and and this 

other man, he and then, when this first one I was 

telling you about, not the other one, saw that he 
and and I am telling you about it just as 

fast as I can. If you don't care to listen, you don't need 
to, but you don't have to be rude about it. 

"Well, then they showed on the screen the and 

the girl not the girl who had the secret formula, 

but the other one who and she — No, Eleanor, 

you may not have another piece of steak, and if you inter- 
rupt mamma again, you shall have no dessert. Well — 
Oh, there is one part I forgot to tell you about! At the 
very beginning there was a and a and it 

seems this girl was his own daughter, although nobody 
knew it but the man everyone thought was dead. No, not 
the first man; the man who came into the log cabin and 
hid the birth certificate under the hearthstone. Don't you 
pay any attention at all to what I am saying? 

"Why don't I get to the interesting part? Well, I'm 
trying to get there just as fast as I can. Willie, if you 
don't stop jiggling those tea spoons— Now I've forgotten 
where I was. No, there isn't any train wreck in this pic- 
ture. Is that all you care about — train wrecks? Well, 
when th's girl found she was alone with the Baron in the 



old and and cellar full of rats, she screamed 

and and he grabbed — George, I passed 

over the fact that you yawned three times, but when you 

start to push your chair back from the table while I am 

trying to talk, I think" 

( This story has no end, but white paper is expensive) 

The Humor Test 

" The principal thing, after all. about film humor 
is to recognize it when you see it." — Sidney Drew. 

If in doubt, wait until the pie is thrown; then you may 
know for sure that it is not a "vampire" film you are 
watching. A few simple rules, carefully memorized, will 
enable anyone to recognize film humor, with a little prac- 
tice. A film is funny 

When sweaters are worn with dress suits. 

When policemen wear chin whiskers. 

When motor cars run around in circles. 

When boxing gloves contain horseshoes. 

When little men carry pianos upstairs. 

When fat men carry light bamboo canes. 
These will be enough for the first, lessons. It is but 
fair to Sidney Drew, however, to add that none of his film 
humor is responsive to such tests. 

Victory for the Allies 

Chicago, "the censorist village of the plain," is rejoic- 
ing over the suspension of its big-chief censor, Major 
Funkhauser, by the acting chief-of-police. Some of the 
fans refer to the joyful event as a glorious victory for the 
Allies. You may remember. "Der Major" was much 
aghasted at Mary Pickford's "The Little American" and 
fought against its presentation. Raus mit der Maje! 



To Look Like Mary Pickford 

OH, Mabel wants, though short and fat, 
To look like Mary Pickford ! 
And Stella wants, though tall and flat, 

To look like Mary Pickford! 
And Elsie, who is very plain, 
But, nonetheless, extremely vain, 
Attempts, with all her might and main, 
To look like Mary Pickford! 

Oh, Cora wants, though poppy-eyed, 

To look like Mary Pickford ! 
And Edna wants (her mouth is wide!) 

To look like Mary Pickford ! 
And Fanny, freckled from her birth, 
Arousing sympathy or mirth, 
Desires, above all else on earth, 

To look like Mary Pickford ! 

Although it may be nice, of course, 

To look like Mary Pickford, 
It makes some happy, others cross, 

To look like Mary Pickford ! 
Note my opinion, you who read: 
To wed have Kate and I agreed ; 
She is so sweet, she does not need 

To look like Mary Pickford ! 

— HiiruM Seton. 

The Quest of the "Scenario" 

TIME was when the picture-puzzle fad held us fast in 
its jig-saw grip. Earlier still, the croquet expert 
wicketed himself in the glow of public attention. 
And there once was a day when a natty pair of side-burns 
sufficed to establish one securely upon a high rung of the 
social ladder. But, to-day, the fad du monde is to create 
moving picture plots, or, to lapse into semi-technical dic- 
tion, "scenarios." Film Fun gives below a sample sce- 
nario, written by one of our readers, a mere boy of 
twenty-one years, with no preparation other than a college 
education: 

THE LOST DIGAMMA 
A Too-real Scenario in Three Quivers 
Scene 1 — ones comes down to breakfast. As he en- 
ters, his wife leaps from behind the door and deals him a 




The Unpopular Movies. 




A CLOSE-UP 

The Actor — Most ■ extraordinary dream I'm having I 
have gone into the movies. 



vicious blow 
with a roll- 
i n g pin. 
(This is al- 
ways t re- 
in e n d ously 
funny. ) The 
cook enters, 
carrying six 
dozen dish- 
es, which 
she conveni- 
ently drops 
on Jones's 
head, thus 
pulling down 
the icebox, 
si deboard, 
china cabi- 
net and, accidentally, one paper wall of the home. 

Scene 2 — Jones is now a full-fledged cowboy — cocker 
spaniel trousers, spurs and all. (There doesn't seem to be 
much connection between these two scenes, but that will 
develop in due time. ) Jones is pursued by three very red- 
faced Indians, who stop now and then to let him keep 
ahead, as he has a slower horse. Gully-eyed Bobbo, the 
half breed villain, comes upon the scene of action, rolls 
his eyes until you think they're going to pop out of their 
sockets and shakes his fist at the Belle Center church, five 
miles away. (He simply must shake his fist. No picture 
is complete without a fist-shaking villain.) 

Scene 3 — Jones comes into his downtown office. Sees 
Smith in the act of cutting the front out of his cardboard 
safe with a paper cutter. Smith stabs Jones. Office boy 
stabs Smith. Mrs. Jones cuts throat of office boy. Mrs. 
Smith enters, and the two women pull each other's hair. 
(This always creates a riot of laughter. ) The toreador 
(now we see the connection) finds the gold on the center 
of the dining-room table, where it had been hidden for 
over twenty years. Bessie lives with her grandfather in 
her old age. 

(Approved by Those Bored of 
Censorship) 



Absent 

Come along to the "movies." Follow 
the crowd. We sob when it sobs, and, in 
turn, laugh aloud. Our hearts freely leap 
to the maid on the curtain, whose job is to 
weep when her feelin's are hurtin'. We 
pity the chap who has landed in prison — 
would gladly exchange all our pleasures 
for his'n. But where is the fellow with 
pity to feel for the soul in the coop who is 
turning the reel? 

Direct from the Front 

"Camouflage" is what makes Fanny 
Ward appear young enough to be her own 
daughter. 



/ seem to 



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SEEING NEW YORK 

Hostess (to Western relation who supposed New York consisted of the Great White Way) — 

Cousin Jim, here is some lobster salad I had John get especially for you at the delicatessen 

store. After dinner we can go to a moving picture show, and then to-night I will make up 

a bed for you on the couch. We do hope you will enjoy your visit to New York. 



■ ■"in imiiiji 



Seeing Battles Over Again 



By Ernest A. Dench 



BATTLES and other things associated with warfare seem 
to hold a particular charm for film producers. Prob- 
ably it is because they satisfy their eternal lust for 
rapid action. The best critic of their work is the veteran 
who has participated in the originals of some of these 
staged battles. 

"What gets over me," said an old veteran, "is why 
these here film men spoil a good, thrilling picture of some 
particular battle by introducing some sloppy love affair. 
Fiction is all very well in its place, but when I see a film 
advertised as 'The Battle of So-and-So, ' I naturally expect 
it to be purely a war spectacle." 

Continuing, he remarked: "Some pictures, by their er- 
rors, annoy me so much that it is a wonder I have the 
patience to sit them through. The ignorance displayed 
would disgrace the average schoolboy. In one picture of 
British army life I recall to mind I found the infantry 
wearing spurs, while the sergeant-major struts in conceit- 
edly with nine medals on his tunic, but he was silly enough 
to wear his Victoria Cross on the wrong side. In a Civil 
War drama I noticed a soldier rushing to save his com- 
rades, but he actually passed several motor cars on the 
way! But even worse was a film which depicted 'The Bat' 
tie of Naseby. ' The scene in particular was a field, in 
which a stiff fight between Royalists and Roundheads took 



place. My attention was distracted from the doings of 
Cromwell's men to an express train passing along in the 
background ! 

"The producer has a similar pitfall in an American 
Revolution film. The soldiers wore uniforms that were 
not adopted until forty years after, while the roads the 
men marched through were actually equipped with tele- 
graph poles and wires ! 

"A court-martial figured in a drama. Twice the num- 
ber of members permitted by British army regulations were 
introduced. And the uniforms — well, their wearers looked 
as though they had just come from a fancy-dress ball ! 

"Very few photoplays respect the ranks of our defend- 
ers from soldiers up to the officers. Apparently all are on 
the same level. 

"Napoleon, in a much boomed production, resembled 
the Emperor about as much as Lord Kitchener did. On 
the horses were saddles, some bearing the E. R. sign, 
others G. R. ; yet both were a hundred years before their 
time. The soldiers were the most lifeless regiment I have 
yet seen. On being shot, they fell down like mechanical 
dolls, but first hesitated where they should fall. Evidently 
they weren't taking any risks. Several put their helmets 
over their eyes as a protection from the glaring sun. Of 
course, they were supers, caring little else but for their 



several dollars a day ; but it is a pity 
that the producers do not take care to 
secure a more military-looking set of 
men. A good idea would be to organ- 
ize a film army with suitable raw hands. 
They could receive the same training 
as an ordinary soldier, and when they 
are efficient, their services could 
be hired by the different film com- 
panies. 

"A retired officer like me would 
drill them, and when a war production 
is in progress, our expert advice would 
be at their disposal. This would mean 
that there would be an end to all the 
silly errors that at present abound at 
the photoplay theaters. I do not won- 
der that the British army authorities 
decline to loan any of their soldiers to 
the producers. The pictures are said 
to portray real life, but 'reel' (this 
with a smile) life is evidently some- 
thing quite different." 

Soliloquy of the Director 

To think or not to think — 

That is the question. 

Suffering Props ! If I only 

Could make 'em think! 

Before I went into 

The Movies, 

I used to hunt Ivory 

And couldn't find any; 

But now 

It's different. 

All the Ivory in the World 

Is Assembled in this 

Piece ! 

Gee! my Head aches 

And 

I'm Tired and Sad and 

My Edges are Frayed out 

And 

I'm Hungry and Sleepy 

And 

The Star is acting like a Sick Cat 

Because her Neck 

Is Sunburned. 

The Leading Man looks like 

A Wooden Gargoyle, 

And 

The Heavy, as an Actor, is the best 

Dog Catcher 

I ever saw ! 

The Juvenile is 

A Piece of Cheese, 

And 

The Extras are almost as 

Intelligent as 

Fried Eggs! 

This story is a cross between 

A Nightmare and a picture 

Of 

The Dismal Swamp ! 

I wish I had a good job 

Collecting ashes. 

Good-night ! 




MOON COMEDI 



There is never a dull moment in " His Finish " from the time when the father 

of the girl institutes a contest between her rival suitors. She agrees to 

marry the one who devises the best method to catch the Kaiser. 

Could You Use an Extra Hundred Dollars? 




T 



^HAT sum will buy a Liberty Bond, and here's an easy 
way for five of you to earn it. Five prizes, each $100 
cash, will be paid for criticisms of Moon Comedies, 
shown on the Proctor and Loew circuits, and in most movie 
theaters of New York and neighboring cities. See them, write 
your criticism briefly, and send to "Contest Editor, Moon Com- 
edies, care Sunshine Films, Inc., 126 West Forty-sixth Street, 
New York City, N. Y." Your full name and home address 
must be on the manuscript. The contest closes October 1st, and payment to the five 
fortunate ones will be made October 15th, 1918. The judges — Mr. M. Binham, 22 
North William Street, and Mr. S. Wald, 2653 Decatur Street, N. Y. City, and Mr. 
H. Jensen, 37-A Cooper St., Brooklyn — who have no connection with Sunshine 
Films, Inc., will designate the five most skillfully constructed criticisms. Pamphlets 
descriptive of comedies as they appear are obtainable free of charge at ticket offices 
of moving picture houses and at the above-mentioned office of Sunshine Film, Inc. 




"Their Unexpected Job" pictures the fortunes — and misfortunes — oj 

two alert comedians who read about the "Fight or Work" order, 

and do not feel like doing either. Their adventures include 

this entertainment in their honor given by the lady who 

aided in their supposed rescue from a submarine. 




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LASHNEEN rOMFANY. Dept 25, Philadelphia 



Short Story Writers 

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Hoosier Instj'ii'e, Short Story Dept, Dept.1596, Fort Wayne, Ind. 



McAdoo and Roosevelt Wear 
SERVICE BUTTONS 

Wear one for TOUR boy. The size of Liberty Loan buttons, price 
25 cents each. SEItVICE FLAGS of beautiful silk. 50 cents each. 
The Kaiser's Prayei — -"Hell's Protest" — on neat bond paper, 
price 25 cents. Views of U. S. Army Cantonments, sample 25 
cents. Views of Alaska. 2 for 25 cents. 
RUBLE McNEILL - 



BOAZ, KENTUCKY 



PHOTOPLAYS WANTED 

Big prices paid. You can write them We show 
you how. Rex Publishers, Box 175, C-15, Chicago. 

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Film Fun 

Magazine of Fun, Judge's Library and 
Sis Hopkins' Own Book Combined. 



No. 353 — SEPTEMBER, 1918 



limilllllll i :::: 



iiiimiiiiiiiiiimin 



Single Copies, 10 Cents 
Subscription by the Year, SI. 00 

illllllllllUlllllllltlllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIlllllMllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllll 

Published monthly by 

LESLIE-JUDGE COMPANY, PUBLISHERS 

NEW YORK CITY. 
John A. Sleicher, President. 

Reuben P. Sleicher, Secretary. 
A. K. Rollauer, Treasurer. 

Grant Hamilton, Art Director. 
Jessie Niles Burness, Editor. 
225 Fifth Avenue, New York. 



uHlliminii 



iiiimiiiimiiiimiiiii 



Copyright, 1918, by Leslie-Judge Company, 

Publishers. 

Title registered as a trade-mark. 

Entered at the post-office at New York as 
second-class matter. 



Advertising Offices: 
225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 
Marquette Building, Chicago, 111. 
Walker Building, Boston, Mass. 
Henry Building, Seattle, Wash. 



FILM FUN is printed by The Williams Printing 
Company. 



Comments and Criticisms 
of a Free Lance 

(Continued from a previous page) 

were so thoroughly rehearsed that no 
direction was given when the different 
scenes were photographed. ' ' Before the 
camera, the player has nothing to think 
about except the director's instruc- 
tions," says Mr. Belasco, which shows 
how pitifully little he knows about it. 
As to the "inspiration of an audience" 
being necessary for good acting, did 
Mr. Belasco ever have an actor in his 
employ who said: "I cannot rehearse. 
I'm never any good at rehearsal, but 
I'll be all right at the performance"? 
Did Mr. Belasco ever know an actor 
who was no good at rehearsal who was 
any good at the performance? "The 
hero must be cast in the mold of an 
Apollo." How about Bill Hart, George 
Beban and Charlie Chaplin? Where 
would the pretty boys, such as Francis 
Bushman, J. Warren Kerrigan or Car- 
lyle Blackwell, figure in a popularity 
contest with these three? 

' ' Deep emotions, when they are faith- 
fully expressed, tend to distort the fea- 
tures and intensify the facial line," 
continues Mr. Belasco. That is true in 
some cases. Emily Stevens illustrates 
this point, and Emily Stevens is annoy- 
ing on the screen to some on that ac- 
count. But no pretty little nonentity 
gets away with the effect of emotion, 
either. She is equally annoying, unless 
she has temperament or intelligence. 
Mr. Belasco seems to overlook the fact 
that brains show in the face; that 
thought or feeling is not merely a 
matter of screwing up the muscles of 
the face. Intelligence, thought and 
feeling are recorded by the camera 
without the necessity of facial distor- 
tions. Even hands on the screen ex- 
press stupidity or intelligence. 

The Way of the Spendthrift 

Mr. Belasco thinks he could produce 
a picture telling his story "not by a 
correlation of incidents," but by the 
facial expression of the actors, and not 
use the "close-up." He'll be a wiser 
man after he has tried it. And he'll 
be wiser yet after taking all the scenes 
in a picture ' ' consecutively, " as he says 
he'd do. He would not have money 
enough left to ever take another one. 
Imagine taking one scene— an interior 
in the studio— then going forty miles 
to take an exterior, back to the studio, 



forty miles to the location, and so on 
for forty scenes, which is just one con- 
tingency that might arise! Mr. Be- 
lasco is also ambitious to regulate a 
picture's speed of projection. To do 
this he would have to maintain a corps 
of expensive operators and control his 
own theaters. A "cold picture of life" 
the screen is destined to remain, con- 
cludes this famous theatrical manager. 
No, no ! It has not been so in the past, 
is not in the present and will not be in 
the future. I have seen as genuine and 
as copious tears shed and heard as 
hearty laughter at the showing of a 
motion picture as ever obtained during 
the acting of any one of the hundreds 
of plays I have witnessed. The motion 
picture has borrowed from other arts, 
but the theater has at least borrowed 
from literature, of which fact perhaps 
Mr. Belasco is aware. If Mr. Belasco 
ever condescends to honor the motion 
picture profession by making a pro- 
duction of his own, I hope he will for- 
get about "Tiger Rose" ! 

Her Career 

(Continued from a previous page) 
mid her wreaths and gold, she'd watch 
a wife and husband go, with children, 
to the movie show — some good, fat 
wife, who never yearned, in whom no 
high ambitions burned; who was con- 
tent to wear old lids and rear a bunch 
of hungry kids; some dowdy house- 
wife, frayed and poor, whose feet had 
walked in paths obscure. 

And Mae would view this toilworn 
dame, an ancient shawl upon her frame, 
as she went waddling with her hub, 
fresh from the stove or washing 
tub; and Mae would heave a mighty 
sigh and shed a tear from her left 
eye. 

Then tawdry all her honors seemed, 
and vain the things of which she'd 
dreamed. She had diplomas in her 
room, but no old withered orange 
bloom; and she had medals in her 
chest, but no man's arm on which to 
rest; and she had gems to pick and 
choose, but no worn pair of baby's 
shoes. And, through a blinding mist 
of tears, she looked back on the van- 
ished years and wished again young 
men might kneel and beg her, with 
true lovers' zeal, to name the day on 
which they'd find true bliss and leave 
all grief behind. 

Meanwhile the wife and husband go, 
with kiddies, to the movie show. 





Mother, Why Don't 

You Take Nuxated Iron 

And Be Strong and Well and Have Nice Rosy Cheeks Instead of Being 
Nervous and Irritable All the Time and Looking So Haggard and 
Old? — The Doctor Gave Some To Susie Smith's Mother When She 
Was Worse Off Than You Are and Now She Looks Just Fine. 

Nuxated Iron Will Increase the Strength and Endurance of 
Weak, Nervous, Careworn, Haggard Looking Women In 
Two Weeks* Time In Many Instances. 

"There can be no healthy, beautiful, rosy 
cheeked women without iron," says Dr. Ferd- 
inand King, a New York Physician and Med- 
ical Author. "I have strongly emphasized the 
fact that doctors should prescribe more organic 
iron — Nuxated Iron — for their nervous, run- 
down, weak, haggard looking women patients. 
When the iron goes from the blood of women, 
the roses go from their cheeks. 

"In the most common foods of America, If you are not strong or well, you owe it to 

the starches, sugars, table syrups, candies, pol- yourself to make the following test : See how 
ished rice, white bread, soda crack- long you can work or how far you 

ers, biscuits, macaroni, spaghetti, ^ >^ can walk without becoming tired. 

tapioca, sago, farina, degerminated ^*r&fflBBs*\> Next take two five-grain tablets of 

cornmeal, no longer is iron to be / f ^X \ ordinary nuxated iron three times 

found. Refining processes have re- / | | \ per day after meals for two weeks, 

moved the iron of Mother Earth / / ~ ff \ Then test your strength again and 

from these impoverished foods, and / W \ see now mucn y° 11 have gained, 

silly methods of home cookery, by j W I Numbers of nervous, run - down 

throwing down the waste pipe the j *^^ '!|L 1 people who were ailing all the while 

water in which our vegetables are l^-sgif' fPj|^^l have most astonishingly increased 
cooked are responsible for another M m JMjL** Jm Ml their strength and endurance sim- 
grave iron loss. w| m W? Jm W ply by taking iron in the proper 

"Therefore, you should supply 'SgJp M Wf form, and this, after they had in 

the iron deficiency in your food by ^ffi Raj Wf some cases been going on for 

using some form of organic iron, ^^| P^ months without getting benefit 

just as you would use salt when from anything, 

your food has not enough salt. 

"I have used Nuxated 
Iron widely in my own prac- 
tice in most severe aggra- 
vated conditions with unfail- 
ing results." 

It is surprising how many 
people suffer from iron defi- 
ciency and do not know it. 
Iron is absolutely necessary 
to enable your blood to change 
food into living tissue. With- 
out it, no matter how much 



Dr. Ferdinand King, New York Physi- 
cian and Medical Author, says that physi- 
cians should prescribe more organic iron 
■ — Nuxated Iron — for their patients — 
Anaemia — iron deficiency is the greatest 
curse to the health, strength, vitality and 
beauty of the modern American "woman. 
— Sou?ids warning against use of metallic 
iron which may injure the teeth, corrode 
the stomach and in many cases do more 
harm than good; advises use of only Nux^ 
ated Iron. 



or what you eat, your food merely passes through prove worse than useless 
you without doing you good. You don't get 
the strength out of it, and as a consequence you 
become weak, pale and sickly looking just like 
a plant trying to grow in a soil deficient in iron. 



But don't take the old 
forms of reduced iron, iron 
acetate, or tincture of iron 
simply to save a few cents. 
The iron demanded by 
Mother Nature for the red 
coloring matter in the blood 
of her children, is alas, not 
that kind of iron. You 
must take iron in a form 
that can be easily absorbed 
and assimilated to do you 
any good, otherwise it may 



Manufacturers' Note: Nuxated Iron which is recommended by physi- 
cians is not a secret remedy but one which is well known to druggists every- 
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not injure the teeth, make them black, nor upset the stomach. The manu- 
facturers guarantee successful and entirely satisfactory results to every pur- 
chaser or they will refund you r money. It is dispensed by all good druggists 
and general stores. 



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1923 



Who's Who and Where 




"The Three Goldwyn Graces" — Madge 

Kennedy, Geraldine Farrar 

and Mae Marsh. 

Mitchell Lewis and his director, Ber- 
tram Bracken, have been busily engaged 
at Idlewild, Cal., in filming exterior 
scenes for the new feature production. 
The play isn't named yet, but the 
play affords opportunities for good 
work surpassing "The Barrier" or 
"The Sign Invisible." The support- 
ing cast includes Tom Santschi, Vivian 
Rich and Margaret Landis. 

-5- 

Two new Hayakawa pictures are soon 
to be released through Mutual. They 
aie productions of the Haworth Com- 
pany, under the star's own direction. 
In "His Birthright," Marion Sais is 
leading lady, and Tsuru Aoki, the tal- 
ented wife of the star, has an impor- 
tant role. "The Temple of Dusk" 
includes the appearance of a bevy of 
charming Nipponese Geisha girls in 
native dances. 

«■?- 

A series of articles dealing with the 
making of photoplays, written by Will 
M. Ritchey, is soon to appear. This 
will be good news to the large and grow- 
ing army of "intending" scenario writ- 
ers. Material of this sort is in great 
demand. "Film Folks, " by Rob Wag- 
ner, recently published by The Century 
Company, supplies valuable informa- 
tion as well as amusement. With these 
books, due diligence and patience, suc- 
cess is assured sooner or later. 



Keep Your Liberty Bonds 

HOLD to that bond. You invested to help send the boys 
across. They are over now, at grips with the German 
monster. You expect them to hold on — hold on till the last 
vestige of autocracy is crushed out of him. Then you, too, 
must hold on — must keep your enlisted dollars invested on the 
fighting line. 

It isn't the hooray of a campaign that wins a war. It's 
the will to hang on, to make sacrifice today, that tomorrow 
may bring victory. 

And your investment. Those bonds are the safest investment you ever 
made. Don't be lured into exchanging them for the "securities" of some 
suave get-rich-quick operator. Big returns may be promised, but the bigger 
the promised returns the bigger the risk. 

If you have to have money, take your bond to any bank and use it as col- 
lateral for a loan. There is no security the banker would rather have — noth- 
ing on which he will lend more willingly. 

Don't use bonds to buy merchandise, The average merchant, accepting 
your bonds in trade, sells them immediately, thus tending to lower their 
market price and taking away from the buyer of your bonds the ability to 
lend a corresponding amount of money to his Government. Liberty Bonds 
are meant to help your country at War; are meant for investment and to 
provide an incentive for saving and a provision for the rainy day. 

Hold fast to your Liberty Bonds. Hold fast for the sake of the boys 
"Over There". Hold fast because it is good business. 

UNITED STATES TREASURY DEPARTMENT 



Contributed through 
Division of Advertising 




United States Gov't Committee 
on Public Information 



This space contributed jot the winning of the war by 
PUBLISHERS OF FILM FUN 



-<~»Sj»*~ 



^c 



> 




eeinq (he World's Best Stories 




O see the characters of a 
famous novel come to 
life upon the screen is a 
tremendous thing ! 

There, alive, in flesh 
and blood, is the hero, or heroine, 
whose exploits you followed breath- 
lessly upon the printed page. 

To the great organization behind 
Paramount and Art craft motion pic- 
tures we are indebted for this in the 
case of "Tom Sawyer", "Oliver 
Twist", "The Sub -Deb Stories", 
"Cinderella", "Old Wives for New", 
"David Harum", "The Bottle Imp", 
"To Have and to Hold", "Great Ex- 
pectations", "The Virginian", "The 




Firefly of France", "His Majesty 
Bunker Bean", "The Varmint", 
Maeterlinck's "The Blue Bird", 
"M'liss", "Resurrection", and liter- 
ally scores upon scores of others. 

The beloved characters of these ro- 
mances find a new and rich lease of life 
in the talent of the equally beloved stars 
of Paramount and Artcraft, 

— foremost in their world as the fic- 
tion-characters in theirs, 

— as superbly directed in their actions 
as were those they portray, 

— and doubly fascinating because 
touched with all the warmth and light 
of life. 



(paramount <^Urtcra£i 

jHotion Cfiictur&s " 



^^ A Ji I • r > 



TIivpp WniiQ in WnntV how to be swre of seeing Paramount 
- 1 - III ee tf ay* IV -L^nvLV nnd Artcraft Motion Pictures 



One — by seeing these 

trade - marks or 

names in the 

advertisements of 

your local theatres. 



two — by seeing these 

trade - marks' or 

names on the front 

of the theatre or in 

the lobby. 



thfic^by seeing these 

.•'trade -marks or 

names;, flashed o n 

the screen inside 

the theatre. 



FAMOUS PLAYERS -LASKY CORPORATION 

ADOLPli ZUKOR Pns. JESSE I. LASKY Vice Prvs. CECIL B.DE MULE DixxtorGcneral 



■-NEW YORIO ■ 






FOREMOST STARS. SUPERBLY DIRECTED, IN CLEAN MOTION PICTURES 



4 




ilm 



And The Magazine 
of Fun, Judge's 
Library and Sis Hopkins' 
Own Book Combined 



tin 



Price 10 Cents 
OCTOBER 
19 18 



NOTICE TO 
READER. 

When you finish read- 
ing this magazine, place 
a one-cent stump on tins 
notice, mail the maga- 
zine, and it will be 
placed in the hands of 
our soldiers or sailors 
destined to proceed 
overseas. 
NO WRAPPING 
—NO ADDrf£SS. 



A Monthly Reel 
of Laughs 




COPYRIGHTED, 1918, BY FILM FUN 



AN ARMY CHAPLIN 



^wM/MMu///im//u/tm///i 




h*4 



The MARKS OF 
BETTER MOTION PICTURES 




OU will never count that hour wasted or a disappoint- 
ment when you see a Paramount ox Art craft Picture. 
Bringing to your city the greatest dramatic talent cf 
screen and stage — Paramount and Artcraft pictures 
give you the photo- play at the apex of its development. 

They are the better pictures sands of the better-class the- 

of the motion picture art — atres all over the country. 

supreme in their stars, great Because these theatres know 

in their stories, and perfect in that your patronage is quickly 

their mounting and direction, won and permanently main- 

And they are marked Para- tained by showing pictures of 

mount or Artcraft to identify quality and character. 

them to you — as your kind of m , . L , 

• . ihere is a theatre in your 

neighborhood showing Para- 



Paramount and Artcraft 
pictures are shown in thou- 



mount and Artcraft pictures. 
See them. 



paramount ^QHcra^ 

jiiotion (pictures " 

Three Ways to Know hm ° t0 A 6 ! sure r °J ™^«'«~* 

5=i and Artcraft Motion Pictures 

One— by seeing these two— by seeing these three— by seeing these 

trade-marks or names trade-marks or names trade-marks or names 

in the advertisements on the front of the flashed on the screen 

of your local theatres. theatre or in the lobby. inside the theatre. 



•m M& FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORPORATION i 

"Sum 



?■-■•■ «\^ 



"FOREMOST STARS. SUPERBLY DIRECTED, IN CLEAN MOTION PICTURES 





^ssm=m&^- 





SEP UI3I 



>CI.B4189 I 




With such location ' ' his, one understands 
The reason for the actor's prayerful hands. 



He offers thanks, and thinks it providential, 
That such a job as this is deemed "essential.' 



Film Fun 

225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

An Independent Illustrated Monthly Magazine 
Devoted to the Best Interests of All 
Motion Picture Art and Artists 

OCTOBER-1918 



o 



n 



n 



Buy a Bond. ( Verse) . . . Berton Braley 2 

Flash Backs. Some News Nuggets and Critical Quips . 3 

The Movie Firm of Mutt and Jeff 4 

What War Has Not Done to the Films .... 

Emma Lindsay Squier 5 

Movie Hold- Up at Yapp's Crossing .... 7 

The Comic Swinging Door . . . A. H. F. 8 

Those Flattering Films ....... 9 

A Hart to Hart Talk A. K. F. 10 

' 'Shoulder A rms. ' ' A review of Charlie Chaplin 's war film 1 1 
Editorial Comment . . .' . . . J2 

The Coming Era . ... . . . . .13 

Living Their Parts ..... 14 



"My Cousin Caruso." The coming comedy . 

The Great Love. D. W. Griffith's second war photoplay 

Movies from Film Fun's Screen .... 

Our Intellectual Movie Queens .... 

Evolution 

Stars I Have Suped With 

Something for the Little Ones 



16 

17 

. 18 

. 19 

Jean Milne Gower 19 

. Harold Seton 20 

22 



The Path of True Love — As It Is Movied 
The Vampire ..... 
Animal Actors in the Movies 
The Last To Go . 



A. H. F. 



"Oh, What a Day !" A Jester comedy reviewed 



23 
24 
25 
26 
27 



A Guide to Screendom 



Lawton Mackall 28 



. Published monthly by LESLIE-JUDGE COMPANY, Publishers, 225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

John A. Sleicher, President Reuben P. Sleicher, Secretary A. E. Rollauer, Treasurer Grant Hamilton, Art Director 

Jessie Niles Burness, Editor A. H. Folwell, Associate Editor 

Copyright, 1918, by Leslie-Judge Company, Publishers Title registered as a trade-mark 

, Entered at the post-office at New York as second-class matter 

Advertising Offices: 225 Fifth Ave., New York City; Marquette Bldg., Chicago, 111.; Walker Bldg., Boston, Mass.; Henry Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

FILM FUN is printed by The Williams Printing Company 



199. a year 



Number 354 



10c a copy 



= =lilLllliliiiiuuimimmim 







UlllllllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllw 




Geraldine Farrar, 
singing "The Star 
Spangled Banner" 
from the steps of 
the New York Pub- 
lic Library, in aid 
of the Third Lib- 
erty Loan, and in 
the picture below 
the crowd that 
cheered her to the 
echo and then sub- 
scribed for bonds 
with spendthrift 
enthusiasm- 



iiiiimiiiiimiiiiiuiiiiiiini 



Buy a Bond 

By Berton Braley 

IT isn't much your country asks of you — 
Merely to lend your cash for freedom's sake, 
That this great conflict may be carried through 
Until the fiendish Prussian might shall break. 
Thousands of men in khaki give their lives 

Freely and gladly in this holy war ; 
If Truth endures and Liberty survives, 

You must back up the cause they're fighting for. 

It isn't much your country asks of you — 

Your dollars — not your blood — to help us win. 
While soldiers in the trenches dare and do, 

They want to know, amid the battle din, 
That you are with them, bearing, here at home, 

Your loyal share. Surely you will respond, 
For if you cannot fight across the foam, 

This much you can do — you can Buy a Bond 

It isn't much your country asks of you — 

You who are safe where life is bright and fair ; 
It asks that with your money you prove true 

To those who battle for you, over there. 
You are not asked to face the screaming shell 

Or risk your life where cannon boom and throb, 
But just to help the boys in all that hell 

By lending cash to arm them for their job. 

It isn't much your country asks of you — 

Only to lend your dollars, not to give, 
That everything we hold as fair and true, 

Decent and human, may not cease to live. 
If you would keep your land from Belgium's fate, 

And save your freedom, now, you will respond. 
Back up our boys who fight the Hosts of Hate. 

Your Nation calls — for God's sake, Buy a Bond ! 



BAIN PHOTO 




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Flash Backs 

Some News Nuggets and Critical Quips 



T 



HE pretty girl crop in California has not been 
blighted, but they still consider it necessary to 
Hoover ize — on raiment. 



Tne answer man in "The Classic" is called 
on to explain that it was Shakespeare, and not Francis X. 
Bushman, who wrote, "Parting is such sweet sorrow." 

Word comes from Metro's West Coast studios that music 
off scene has been discontinued. What they've done to the 
salary list is all any player needs to enable him to "reg- 
ister sorrow." 

A close-up of a "h'ant" in convincing postures is 
promised us in "The Ghost of the Rancho, " a five-reel 
comedy drama featuring Bryant Washburn and Rhea 
Mitchell. Who's afraid? 

Darrell Foss has sold his alarm clock and invested the 
proceeds in thrift stamps. He says all his Hollywood 
neighbors are named "Hennery" and what's the use of an 
alarm when a simple cock-a-do'll do. 

The way to keep Young has been discovered in Cali- 
fornia. Clara Kimball has decided she will make pictures 
hereafter until further notice in the West Coast studios, 
where the coal shortage ceases from troubling. 

"Neither measles nor matrimony for a year from date 
of execution of this contract" is what any girl who wants 
to work for the Christie Films Company must agree to. 
'S all right. But why couldn't they have put in "divorce," 
too, if they don't want any distractions? 

"The Great Water Peril" isn't prohibition propaganda. 
It's a Toto comedy — the last of this series, after complet- 
ing which this favorite funmaker will return to vaudeville. 
Seems a bit queer that this picture immediately follows 
his "Dippy Daughter." 

Win-the-war enthusiasm is exactly what one who knows 
the West would expect to find out there, but it may be car- 
ried a bit too far. Aileen Percy reports that the tomb- 
stones in the old cemeteries she lately visited in San Diego 
carry the sign, "Wake up ! Your country needs you !" 

Madam Olga Petrova visited thirty-five cities in forty 
days' time and raised nearly a half million dollars in a 
War Savings Stamp tour. Then she was asked to donate 
the tattered raiment which survived the strenuous struggle, 
and the two worn gowns were auctioned for a considerable 
sum. 

A flashback — well, what else would you call it? Seat- 
tle to New York, over the Lincoln Highway, Mrs. Linda 
A. Griffith, our Free Lance contributor, is driving her own 
machine. The best run so far recorded for one day was 
160 miles, into Spokane. She will tell you all about it 
next month. 

Los Angeles at last has smirched its record for being 
accessible to any location for any clime, race, creed or 
period of time. A director searched in vain through the 
former "beer belt" for one of those saloons with a frothing 



stein frescoed on its front. Never mind. If they'd found 
it, think what the censors would have done to the film. 

Ethel Barrymore, in "Our Mrs. McChesney," will make 
a winning picture, a feature of which will be a genuine 
fashion show, with well-known models wearing the latest 
creations. Women who want to see this photoplay will 
have to go early to avoid the rush — of men — some of whom 
explain their presence in such large numbers at these dress 
rehearsals by saying they believe in "preparedness." 

How film folks do revive old fashions ! Here is Charlie 
Chaplin "taking the cake." The Green Room Magazine of 
Australia awards each year an enormous and luscious cake 
to the favorite of stage or film whose work has contributed 
most to "the gayety of nations." This year they have de- 
clared for "A Dog's Life." The cake, now in transit, re- 
quired considerable cargo space. 

Why doesn't some one of the many valorous ones who 
suffer the misfortune of having been born too soon to get 
into active service arrange a fashion show of uniforms? 
More than twenty different styles for women in war service 
so far have received government approval. Louise Glaum 
says a good many more would enroll for service if there 
was any way of finding out if one would look well in the 
uniform she would be required to wear. 




jeuiies nioi<-co.' en* FbAOfi. 



When this director says ' 'roll over, ' ' ' 'juw.p through, ' ' 

"walk lame," or "play dead," they all do it, 

and don't you go to thinking you'd be the 

exception, for there's never been any. 



The Movie Firm of Mutt and Jeff 




'Give their eyes the 
once-over; that's the 
way to tell Vam- 
pires, ' ' says Mutt, 
knowingly. 



With the Katzen- 
jammer Kids eleva- 
ting the screendom 
stage, the movie debut 
of Mutt and Jeff came 
along as naturally as 
a brick in a comic 
supplement. The se- 
cret of movie success 
being the signed con- 
tract of a reliable 



But all is not Vamp that glitters. The 

producing firm resolves to call 

for a new deal. 



So the Vamps report 

at peepholes in a 

sheet and await 

the big decision. 



Vampire, the produ- 
cing firm of Mutt and 
Jeff take novel steps 
to land a lure-lady. 
The proof of the Vam- 
pire is the spell of her 
eyes. This is good 
theory until the man- 
agement takes a back 
profile view. Then the 
eyes no longer have it. 



What the War Has 



Not Done to the Films 

By Emma Lindsay Squier 




TRIANGLE 



Enid Bennett "demonstrating" that although wars may come and wars may go, we will always have 

M. M. M. — meaning men, money and movies. 



"W 



*AR Kills Movies! Mars Lays Iron Hand on 
Realm of Cinema, Throttling Silent Drama ! ' ' 
Such was the startling headline in a Los An- 
geles newspaper a few days ago, and it came 
as a brutal shock, since no one had suspected the motion 
picture industry of being defunct or even decadent. The 
article, written by a reporter with a ninety-mile imagina- 
tion and a seven-passenger vocabulary, arrayed similes, 
metaphors and hyperboles in vivid panorama to describe 
the passing of the silver screen. The male stars had all 
gone to war or were go- 
ing; hundreds of "extra 
men" were being nabbed 
daily as non-essentials; 
the price of celluloid had 
risen sky-high, and rail- 
road rates made film 
shipments impossible; 
exhibitors were closing 
their doors, as their 
patrons were spending 
money for thrift stamps 
instead of entertainment. 
Outside of this, things 
were as usual. 

It was a picture to 
make a film fan weep or 
a producer cuss. Being 
a retired newspaper per- 
son myself, I took the out- 
burst with as much salt as 
Hoover would permit and 
went out to Hollywood to 
see what was or wasn't 
happening to the movies. 







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PARAMOUNT 



4 wizard of the West Coast studios, Cecil B. De Mille, whose 

magic spells are cast from this studio, a cross 

between a church and a hunting lodge. 



No crape hung on the doorknob at Lasky's studio nor 
did the place have a deserted air. True, there was quite a 
bit of knocking going on, but it was being done by carpen- 
ters in a strictly legitimate manner. 

Cecil B. De Mille was hard at work in his Gothic 
studio, which looks like a cross between a church and a 
hunting lodge, being done in severe dark oak, with stained- 
glass windows, hung with trophies of the chase, and car- 
peted with woolly bear rugs and Three Weeks tiger 
skins. When I broke the news about the movies' death, 

he seemed surprised. 

"Hadn't heard of 
it, " he remarked. "I'm 
working on three new 
features and expect to 
get at 'em right away. 
Someone has been mis- 
informed. Stars — oh, 
of course, many of them 
have gone to war, but 
enough remain to make 
all the pictures we can 
turn out from now until 
Berlin surrenders. As 
for extras, they can ar- 
rest five hundred, and 
we'll find two hanging 
around where before one 
had feared to tread. As 
for celluloid prices, rail- 
road rates and expenses 
generally, they may go 
heaven - high, but bear 
this in mind: we'll 
always have — M. M. M. " 




Madame Bernhardt wished she could do 
" zat walk, so drole, so fonnie." 




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"Meaning Mary Miles Minter?" I hazarded. 

"Absolutely not," he denied. "I mean Men, Money, 
Movies." 

When I went out on the lot, I noticed that Mary Pick- 
ford's little gray bungalow dressing-room was fenced in 
with barbed wire. I asked whether it was to keep Mary 
in or the reporters out, but it was neither; it had been 
used as part of a detention camp set, in a war picture not 
yet released. By the way, "Little Mary" isn't working 
now, '■'jing on a well-earned vacation at Santa Monica 
Beach. The bungalow is quite like Mary — petite, dainty 
and different. It is fitted up a la Japanese, a sort of ar- 
tistic hang-over from "Madame Butterfly," with sliding 
doors, lacquered furniture and everything of a Pickford 
minuteness, except the 'phone, which is life size. 

Out on stage four a gentleman in khaki was being 
helped into a facial bandage which completely covered 
everything except eyes and mouth. 

"What's the idea of hiding the geography?" he was 
asking of the administering director. 

No, he was not a wounded war hero, merely Fred Stone, 
late of vaudeville fame, who was thus being swathed to be 
"shot" in a scene of "The Goat," his last picture before 



he returns to the stage. The story concerns the fortunes 
of an ironworker, who has the misfortune to resemble the 
leading man of a movie company and is induced to "dou- 
ble" for him in some hazardous stunts with laughable re- 
sults. The picture will show a great deal of the inner 
workings of the movies and ought to appeal to those fans 
who like to peep behind the scenes. 

On another stage Elliott Dexter and Ethel Clayton were 
finishing a picture, and Elliott, whose voice is as soulful as 
his eyes and whose appearance is perfectly thrilling, even 
if he does need a haircut around the neck, told me that his 
next picture would be "The Squaw Man," directed by Cecil 
De Mille. 

That was the first picture Mr. De Mille ever directed 
out West, many years ago, and they ran off the oldtimer 
the other night in the projection room, and it was — funny. 

Clara Kimball Young, of the magnificent eyes and 
gowns, is taking a vacation in New York, having finished 
"The Savage Woman." It is taken from a French story, 
the title of which, literally translated, would be "The Wild 
Woman." And that, coming as a September (Morn?) re- 
lease, would never get by the censors ! 
(Continued on paae. 30) 




Those Flattering Films 



Next to an unretouched photo- 
graph, the moving picture screen is 
the greatest flatterer in the world. It 
doesn't flatter those who appear in the 
pictures so much as those who sit in 
front and watch them. 
Nobody can attend a moving picture show without being 
reasonably confident that he has assimilated everything. 
It is not like the spoken drama, where one learns, on pick- 
ing up the paper the next morning, that he missed just 
about half the subtleties in the performance and came near 
losing the big idea of the whole thing. Everything is right 
where all of us can get each detail without effort, and in 
grabbing those details we find great matters for self-con- 
gratulation. Just as an instance, a picture of a young man 
is flashed upon a screen. He is sitting at a table, in a 
dreamy attitude. Finally there appears in the upper cor- 
ner of the picture a portrait of a girl. The portrait appears 
slowly, as if through a mist. The young man's features 
take on a rapt expression. Everyone in the audience 
knows he is thinking about his sweetheart, as visualized in 
the upper part of the screen. A fat traveling salesman 
who Emma-McChesneyizes in crockery whispers loudly to 
his wife, "He's thinkin' about his girl," and then shakes 
hands with himself because of his cleverness in discovering 
the point and his quickness in making it known. The fat 
man is confident that he was the first in all that large audi- 
ence to discover what the young man on the screen was 




thinking about. Then the young man 
in the picture takes up a desk telephone 
— something which no interior scene is 
without nowadays. Whereupon the fat 
man whispers, louder than before ; loud 
enough for the row to hear: 

"He's goin' to telephone to her. Didn't I tell you?" 
Marvelous perspicacity of the fat man! The young 
man does telephone his sweetheart, who is seen answering, 
and who, of course, is none other than the young woman 
whose portrait appeared on the screen in the guise of a 
mental image. 

The fat man scores another putout for himself. Before 
the evening ends, he scores forty putouts without a bobble 
— a record which the star shortstop in either big league 
could not equal. He goes home shaking hands with him- 
self as a clever guy. Quick thinking, that, guessing those 
situations as fast as they came up. Not many could do it. 
And several hundred in the theater are thinking in the 
same strain with the fat man. They have caught every- 
thing the playwright threw to them. He didn't fool them 
for a quarter of a second. They could even tell how the 
play was going to come out almost two deep breaths and a 
gasp before the hero grabbed the heroine for the final fade- 
away clinch and kiss. Thus it is that the movies are get- 
ting in their evenings of insidious flattery and sending 
everybody home supremely pleased with himself, in good 
humor with his neighbors and content with his job. 




THE LATEST GOSSIP OF THE MOVIES 




A Hart to Hart Talk 



"W 



'ELL, well, Bill, it looks as though I'd got the 
drop on me, doesn't it?" 

"It sure does, William. There isn't any- 
body else who could have done it so neatly." 

"Or done it at all, for that matter, when you come 
right down to it." 

"You said something then, William. How does it 
seem to me to be looking in the face of a gun or two that 
won't weaken?" 

"Very odd. In all my experience as a bad man, I 
never quite felt the same sensation. In a way, of course, 
it's a big relief." 

"A big— what? Relief?" 

"Yes. You know, ofttimes I have wondered whether 
there was anybody" in the. whole wide world who COULD 
get the drop on me. I'm not conceited. I felt sure all 
along that there must be a real he-man somewhere who 
could put it over, and that some day I should meet him. 
Now that I've met me and know the worst, it's a relief, as 
I told me, to get it done." 

"But suppose it isn't over? Suppose I pull one of these 
triggers and shoot me? For, you know, I've the devil of a 
temper when I'm roused, William." 

"I know you have, Bill." 

"You've often seen my lips get tight and work in that 
deadly passionate way of mine, haven't you? And there 
isn't any girl around suddenly to reform me and make me 
good, you know. I'd just as soon shoot me as not, I feel 
that desperate. ' ' 



"You wouldn't shoot a chap who had honestly turned 
square, would you, Bill?" 

"That's just the point, William. I wouldn't believe 
me under oath when it comes to that turning square busi- 
ness. You're always reforming and always backsliding. 
If I let me go, the chances are that I'll ride right up the 
nearest canyon and rob, an army pay wagon." 

' ' You want to remember something before you let fly, 
Bill." 

"Yes? What's that, William?" 

"You're in as much danger from these guns as I am 
from those. Let's make a duel of it." 

"But I might kill me!" 

"If you did, that would be. suicide, and suicide is a 
crime. Nobody does that in the movies except weaklings 
and ruined men. You're not a ruined man, are you, Bill?" 

"Not while the movie game is as good as it is, William. 
Before I'd kill me, I'd shoot myself. Let's put up the 
guns and be pals." 

"Done ! But you're just about the only fellow I would 
lower my guns to, I want me to understand that!" 

"I get you, William. Let's hike over the divide to the 
opposite page and have a look at Charlie Chaplin. He'll 
make me laugh, and I need a laugh now and then, never 
doing much of it in business hours." 

"Say, Bill, there were only blanks in those forty-fours 
of mine." 

"I knew it all the while, William. Same with my 
guns. No wonder we weren't scared of us !" —a. h. f. 



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Waiting for the Climax 

Eddy, little Bobby's playmate, was asked by a motion 
picture company to pose for them. Later, when the pic- 
ture was produced, Bobby went to see ' ' him. ' ' Eddy played 
a very thrilling role of escaping from the pantry with a 
glass of jam just before his "aunt" went in search of him. 

Bobby sat through the show, eying his playmate a little 
jealously, and then every day that week found Bobby spend- 
ing his nickels for a front seat. 

The manager of the show, becoming curious, asked the 



reason, and Bobby replied: "Some day that woman's 
gonna ketch 'im, an' I wanna see the fun." 

Modern 

She — I think that the constellations are very nicely 
named. There's Cassiopeia's Chair, Berenice's Hair, 
Great Bear, and 

He — Ah, but think of the names we could have given 
them in these days: Mary Pickford's Hair, Charlie Chap- 
lin's Cane, Fatty Arbuckle's Pants, and so on. 



Charlie Chaplin Goes Over the Top 




The face and bearing of a hero; also a 

hero-worshiper, Miss Lucille 

Cavanaugh. 

/CHARLIE CHAPLIN, in a screen version of the war, is 
^ booked to arrive at about the same time as the Fourth 
Liberty Loan Drive. Indeed, it is rumored, and not denied, 
that Secretary McAdoo had something important to say as 
to Charlie's appearance in khaki. From the dinky derby 



Charlie's fighting face; grim- 

visaged war against the Hun 

or, it may be, the Cootie- 



^3V 




An Army Chaplin. 



and the bamboo cane to the tin 
helmet and the army rifle is a 
transition which this page graph- 
ically illustrates. The name of this rift in the war clouds 
is "Shoulder Arms." 



EDITORIAL 



A Song of Sixteen Thousand Shirts 

THE Stage Women's War Relief, when August re- 
turns were in, had sent abroad sixteen thousand 
baby dresses, made at their own cost and under 
their own supervision, from material they pro- 
cured. They've sent hundreds of comfort kits. Their 
accomplishment is something to be proud of, but the baby 
dresses are the banner achievement. 

The stage women — and that means the film favorites, 
too — have always had their own original ideas to work on. 
This time they invaded clubs, barber shops, billiard par- 
lors, hotel lobbies and other meeting places of men, and 
tacked up in a conspicuous place one of the little garments, 
explaining the need for them and how they could be made 
from clothes no longer serviceable. The men responded 
"manfully." They co-operated gloriously; their enthusi- 
asm seems to wax rather than wane. 

Indications are not lacking that the haberdashers, as 
well as the refugee babies, are rising up to call the stage 
women "blessed." Which is as it should be. Among 
the workers who remodel the garments many war widows 
find congenial employment to meet their needs. 

A Hint to Exhibitors 

IN ALL cities throughout the country 
where there are training camps and 
cantonments, there are stranger lads 
with no place to go. Why don't you 
give them a night each week at your 
show-shop? 

There is a motion pic- 
ture and vaudeville house in 
New York, which we have 
quoted before in these col- 
umns, where they sing "God 
Save Our Men," at which 
such a plan is in successful 
operation. This is about 
the way they do it: They 
issue an invitation, let us 
say to the Red Cross, to 
give a theater party. The 
Red Cross accepts, saying 
that about 300 nurses will 
be there. The house buys 
and reserves that number 
of the best seats in the 
auditorium — front rows, 
center. Entertainers in- 
terpolate a few special num- 
bers that fit the special 
guests, and as one of the 
boys said: "Good feeling 
is flagged a - comin' and 
a-goin'." There's no 
chance at all for the guests 
to spend any money. 



We know of the following : A matinee to convalescents 
returned from the front — there were 400 of these; a party 
of the British-Canadian boys, 180; another, of 280, from 
the French battleships Marseillais and Gloire ; another, 290, 
allied soldiers' and sailors' night; and still another, over 
300, of the boys from the San Diego, with the band from 
the battleship Huntington as escort. That it has turned 
out to be an excellent thing for the house from a business 
standpoint is another demonstration of the truth in the old 
saying that "fame and fortune usually come to the men 
who have been thinking vigorously of something else." 

We hope you may think it an experiment worth trying. 

We Believe in Signs 

MANY automobiles in the city of New York, a goodly 
number of which belong to movie folks, carry a 
beautiful sign upon the windshield, and the finer the car, 
the more the sign enhances its worth. It indicates, too, 
that the spiritual equipment of the owner is fine and fit. 
They are to be seen in Rolls-Royce cars and all intermedi- 
ate grades, clear through to the "flivver" of the year- 
before-last. The lettering reads: "Men in the service, 
RIDE, if you are going our way." 

Many a soldier and sailor boy will gladly bear 
witness that these signs mean what they say, for 
many a weary stranger has tried hailing a car that 
carries one, and been carried in comfort on his way. 
The boys are ' ' for it, ' ' and the car owners who are 
trying this out as one way of "doing their bit" are 
recommending it to their friends as better than 
worth while. We would like to see the fashion 
generally adopted. 

The Star System 

THE greatest stars of theater and opera are 
appearing in photoplays in greater num- 
bers than ever before — Ger- 
aldine Farrar, Enrico Ca- 
ruso, Ethel Barrymore, Fred 
Stone, Jack Barrymore and 
Anna Case, to mention only 
the most noted names ap- 
pearing in casts of photo- 
plays to be i eleased in the 
early autumn. The plays 
in which they appear are 
suitable and are staged fault- 
lessly. There could be nc 
better opportunity than these 
pictures will afford the fans 
for deciding for or against 
the star system, with the 
enormous outlay it involves, 
which, of course, the picture 
theater patrons must pay. 
The box-office verdict may 
be awaited with interest. 




WHO WOULDN'T BE PINCHED FOR SPEEDING? 

Norma Talmadge, newly appointed deputy sheriff 

of Queens County, should do much for 

the county treasury. 




<5tEB\weOD 



No, this miserable old couple won't have to go to the poorhouse. They are prosperous young New 

Yorkers, employed by a film company. 

The Coining Era 



1HAD been away from New York six weeks. Great 
changes are apt to take place during these prolonged 
absences, and I was hungry for a glimpse of the Great 
White Way. It was barely seven when I hustled out upon 
Broadway, and they were just beginning to turn on the 
electric signs that blaze along that famous thoroughfare. 

I paused before the Umphsteenth Street Theater. 

"Rollo in the Country." Thus read the electric sign 
over the entrance to that historic playhouse. 

"Praised by press, pew 
and pulpit," stated the 
posters flanking the door- 
way. I rubbed my eyes and 
wandered on. 

"Elsie's School Days." 
This sign held me for an 
astonished moment in front 
of the Frivolity, home of 
doubtful screen dramas. 

"Pure as the driven 
snow, ' ' was the supplemen- 
tary indorsement. 

In front of the Rotter- 




THE GENERAL COMPLAINT 
The Squirrel — That's the trouble with these moving 
pictures. They send 'em through too fast. 



dam Avenue Theater I encountered the rotund manager of 
that house. 

"What's the matter with Broadway?" I stammered. 
The manager grinned. 

"You mean these pure films?" he responded. 
I nodded feebly. 

' ' Well, you see, New York was tired of crook dramas 
and red-light shockers. There was bound to be a reaction. 
The pendulum has merely swung the other way ; the strictly 

pure movie holds the boards 
now. I've got the greatest 
of them all," he boasted. 

He touched a button, and 
his own electric sign flashed 
up: 

"Our Native WiM Flow- 
ers. ' ' 

"It's a knockout, my 
boy," chirped my friend, 
the manager. "It'saclean 
knockout, and a package of 
cubeb cigarettes goes with 
every orchestra coupon." 



Living Their Parts 




A new picture of Preska Sheek, of 
"The Destitute's Fame." 




The creator of "Polly," the heroine 
of "In Poverty's Grip." 







Leisure moments with the charming 
"Nan," of "Hope in a Hovel" (3 reels). 



Then and Now 

1888 
^/^OOD-MORROW, friend! 



G 



How fares the world with 
thee?" 

"Well, and yet again well, friend. 
And how with thee?" 

"Inspiringly. Never have I had 
a more uplifting journey with my 
fellows of the doublet and hose in 
the realm known as the provinces. 
We played our entire repertory of 
thirty - seven classical dramas, and 
everywhere were we greeted with 
crowded houses. The populace 
seems to love in exceeding measure 
the dramas of sweet Will Shake- 
speare. Our great star — forever hon- 
ored be his name in the annals of 
the American stage ! — was never 
more inspired. His Hamlet caused 
the pit to rise at him again and 
again. His Macbeth was acclaimed 
till methought the roof would fall on 

our heads. His combat on Bosworth Field brought the 
wildest plaudits of all, so masterly is his art of the fence. 
Faith, I can hardly wait till this night, when we appear 
in that delicious comedy, 'Much Ado About Nothing.' " 

"As you say, good friend, 'tis a privilege to belong to 
our profession in these days. May the hours never grow 
less inspirational to the actor. Our brave star — and may 
her memory always be kept green by the American public 




Leila Passementerie, the star of the 5-r eel 
success, "Famine Days." 



— appeared in the roles in which she 
has endeared herself to the playgoers 
of all our centers of cultivation. 
Her Beatrice proved something to con- 
jure by, and her Rosalind is some- 
thing ever to treasure in the memory. 
To act with her is to be transported 
into an elysium of delight, so great 
an artist is she. To-night she ap- 
pears as Juliet, and methinks she 
will have the whole house in tears, 
as is her wont, as a tribute to her 
art in the tomb scene." 

"Au revoir, comrade, for I must 
be off to rehearse our next produc- 
tion, 'She Stoops To Conquer' — in 
faith, a witty play." 

"Au revoir! I, too, must be 
at my daily task of memorizing 
my next role. To-morrow night we 
stage that brave tragedy, 'King 
Lear."' 

(Both actors shake hands form- 
ally, and exit.) 

As It Is in 1918 

"Hello, Mike!" 

"Topo' th' mornin', Adolf!" 

"Whatchu got on?" 

"Oh, our back number of a film director's still nuts 
over that chase stuff. Gotta hike all over seven counties 
in cowboy costume, chasin' a Mexican outlaw." 

"Whatchu know about me? I gotta jump off the Pali- 



We are no other than a moving row of magic shadow shapes, that come and go, 

'Round with the sun-illumined lantern held in midnight by the Master of the show. — Omar Khayyam. 



sades in a parachute. Yet us jumpin' actors don't git no 
more mazoom than you simps that jest have to set in a 
saddle and ride all day." 

"Well, what's the jumpin' you boobs do to havin' a 
fool livery horse stumble and roll over you seven times? 
Besides, when I'm through wit' dis here chase, I gotta pile 
inter an ottymobile and come down to the salt front and 
jump into the green waves, rescuin' a loidy what's t'rowed 
off a pirut ship." 

"Well, I gotta jump into water, ain't I? And when I 
get dried off, I gotta hike downtown and be t'rowed out of 
a skyscraper window by a gang o' counterfeiters." 

"Gee, I envy dem old-time actors what didn't have 



nothin' to do but come out and talk lines from Shakespeare 
or some of dem old guys." 

"I'd like to see what'd happen to Shakespeare if some 
of his junk ever got to our director in scenario form." 

"Why, he wouldn't be one, two, 'leven ! You gotta put 
some zing in your dope dese days. People won't stand for 
this art fer gosh sake game no more." 

' ' And you betcher gotta be a real actor in dese days of 
ridin' and jumpin' in front of the camery." 

"Surest thing! What'd them old Booth and Barrett 
supporters know about doin' a forty-foot fall?" 

(Both sarcastically) 

"Haw, haw!" 



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'■''I'M " 







"LOOK OUT, MOTHER!" 



^My Cousin Caruso" 



A tense moment 
in Roberto Bom- 
bardi's restaurant 
when Veddi's at- 
tention is called 
to the arrival of 
his famous cousin 
at the little 
sculptor shop 
across the street. 




His leisure hours 
he greets with a 
voice of gladness 
and the joy fulness 
characteristic of 
the Italian people. 



PA RA MOCNf-ARTCRAFT 



Veddi at work upon the statue of his 
famous cousin which he believes 
will bring him good 
fortune. 



Caruso, in the costume of Pagliacci, 

is discussing with director 

Jose the opera house 

scenes. 



In this comedy the great tenor 
plays two roles, Caruso, and Luigi 
Veddi, a sculptor. The latter's life 
is dominated and his ambition fired 
by the fame of this cousin. From the 
gallery he and his sweetheart hear the 
opera "Pagliacci," and afterward he 
models a figure of Caruso, and takes 
the gift to the tenor's hotel. The visit 
is resented as an intrusion. On the f ol - 
lowing day Veddi sends a boy to bring 
back the little clay figure. From this 
messenger the singer learns the truth 
about the cousin, the sincerity of his 
motives and the worth of his work. 
After looking at the little statue and 
recognizing the artistry of it, the 
singer makes haste to Veddi's studio 
and commissions him to reproduce in 
marble the plaster cast. Caruso 
and Jose have worked into the story 
the temperamental characteristics of 
the Italian — his vanity, underlaid 
with talent; his humor; his passion; 
and his loyalty. 



?? 



The Great Love 



99 







Susie resents unfair dealing, even to the point 
of ordering her bridegroom from her room. 



In this new Griffith picture of 
the great war, Susie (Lillian Gish) 
is an Australian visiting in London. 
She is much attracted by Jim Young 
(Robert Harron), an American who 
has enlisted with the British army. 
While he is absent on duty, she falls 
heir to a large fortune and so be- 
comes irresistibly attractive to Sir 
Roger Brighton (Henry Walthall), 
who succeeds in marrying her. She 
learns what a mistake she has made 
and rectifies it by devotion to the 
Great Love, which consists in serv- 
ice to her country and its defenders. 
A Zeppelin air raid and big battle 
scenes taken at the front add real- 
ism and thrills, and the heart of 
the beholder is touched by pictures 
showing many notable personages, 
including Queen Alexandra, serving 
the cause, inspired thereto by the 
Great Love. 




PABAMOUNT-ARTCBAFT 



Warning of an air raid is given thus 
by special speedy mes- 
sengers. 



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FISHERMAN'S LUCK— SHOWING HOW EXPENSIVE A FISHING TRIP MAY BE 



Our Intellectual Movie Queens 

(From almost any clip sheet) 

IT WILL be pleasing to our readers, we feel sure, for 
them to know something about the life of Laura Love, 
who took the part of Chastity in "The Grip of the 
Python." 

Miss Love spent the early years of her life in a con- 
vent, where she had little or no thought of becoming the 
nightly favorite that she now is. The quiet round of her 
life was then taken up with her beads and her needlework. 

On turning her back to cloistral walls, she traveled in 
the United States, journeying West, where she lived with 
the Sun Dance Indians. On account of her rare charm and 
beauty she was adopted into their tribe and given the name 
of Agunquack, which in the Sun Dance language means 
"Sunshine from the Happy Hunting Ground." It was 
during her long association with the Sun Dance Indians 
that she picked up her wealth of knowledge of Indian life, 
which has been of such great help to her in her masterly 
portrayal of American aboriginal character. 

In her early life Miss Love's ambition was to be an 
artist, and while she was in the Latin Quarter she studied 
under some of the world's greatest masters. She studied 
for years and was just on the verge of a career when she 
felt the call of Thespis and laid down her palette for the 
make-up box. Even the splendid acting she does in the 
silent drama does not suffice, her old professors think, for 
the fact that she deserted them for the cinematographic 
stage. 

During the few summer days that she can steal away 
from the studios, she goes to Canada for her vacations, 
where she may live in sweet, simple quiet with the French 
Canadians, where she converses with them in their own 
language, for it may come as a surprise to the thousands 
of admirers of Miss Love to know that she is a profound 



' ' ■ ; u.i.ri 





THE IDEAL SPOT 
Minnie (just returned from her vacation) — Oh, I was at 
the dandiest place — movies and electric signs on the main 
street. Honestly, you wouldn't know you were out of town! 



Not passed by the Board of Censors. 

student of Early French. In college she specialized in this, 
and her graduation theme was entitled "The Now Obsolete 
Irregular Verbs of the Early French." Miss Love is never 
happier than when chatting with the simple French Cana- 
dians in their own language — a language now known to 
only a few etymologists. 

It was while traveling extensively abroad that Miss 
Love became fascinated by Egypt, where she made a spe- 
cialty of Egyptology. There are few in the world — if any 
— who have the intimate knowledge of the early life of the 
Egyptians that Miss Love has. Her specialty is the 
life and reign of Amenhotep III., one of the early 
Pharaohs. Her translations from the hieroglyphics on 
the colossi and on the cliff monuments at Edfu, cele- 
brating Amenhotep's wars of conquest, are a delight to 
antiquarians. 

Miss Love is eighteen years old. 

Evolution 

When movies first invaded us, 

We didn't care a hang, 
So long as the hero loved the girl 

And the heroine loved the man ; 
But now we are not satisfied 

Without an orang-outang ! 

We want volcanoes, earthquakes ! 

Tempests on land and seas ! 
Boats going down ! Banks blowing up! 

Vampires and jamborees! 

Alas for the good old love-stuff days, 

With the hero on his knees ! 

—Jean Milne Goiver. 



Many moving picture operators give up their jobs 
because they cannot stand the grind. 



w 



Bliss Triumphant 

HEN first I went to movie shows, 
I struggled with suspense ; 
Before the fillum neared its close, 
My worry was intense, 

For fear the lovers in the piece 

Their final joy should miss; 
I wot me not each movie plot 
Must end up with a kiss. 

No longer do I palpitate 

Lest virtue bite the dust; 
However dark the clouds of fate, 
Unshaken is my trust. 

Upon the villain's passing gain, 

I do not waste a hiss ; 
I know the tale will never fail 
To end up with a kiss. 

The second act may reek with blood, 

And justice may go lame, 
While tears are falling in a flood 
As honor yields to shame. 

Yet though they toss the heroine 

Into a deep abyss, 
I am serene; the final scene 
Will end up with a kiss. 

Philosophy may vainly strive 

To further human cheer, 
And creeds without success contrive 
To banish doubt and fear. 

But pessimism has no chance 

To discount mortal bliss, 
When, spite of woes, scenarios 
All wind up with a kiss. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiliiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiM 

Stars I Have Suped With 

By Harold Seton 




1~1HE stars referred to in the title of this article are 
not the stars in the sky. Neither are they the 
stars on the stage. They are the stars of the 
screen. I had seen each and every one of them 
many times — on the films ; but three weeks ago I saw them 
for the first time — in person. 

Mr. Robertson, the casting director for the Goldwyn 
Company, let me go on as a supe or "extra man" in a 
scene in Geraldine Farrar's new piece, "A Turn of the 
Wheel." I was a reporter in a courtroom episode and did 
not suffer from stage fright or camera fright. I was too 
much interested in the other people to feel conscious of 
myself. 

I was interested in the director and in the camera man ; 
but, most of all, I was interested in the star. Some people 
call her Miss Farrar, some call her Madame Farrar, and 
some call her Mrs. Tellegen; but I call her — a genius! 
After having observed her absolute sincerity in going 
through her performance, I declare myself a Farrar 
enthusiast. 

Some of the "extra" people stared at the star with mild 
curiosity, while others glanced at her with supreme indif- 
ference. But they had been supeing for months and 
months, perhaps for years and years. This was my first 
experience in a studio, so I was spellbound and enthralled. 



Besides the artistic enthusiasm of Geraldine Farrar, 
another thing that impressed me was her devotion to her 
husband. Lou Tellegen hovered in the background, and 
when Madame was not posing for her pictures, she was ex- 
changing confidences with the versatile gentleman, half 
Greek and half Dutch, who has acted in French with Sarah 
Bernhardt and in English as a star in his own plays. 

My next episode was with the World Company. Miss 
Rose, the assistant casting director, sent me on a picture 
with Louise Huff. The scene was at a fashionable party. 
Miss Huff was dressed as a Red Cross nurse. Her yellow 
tresses were concealed beneath a black wig, but she looked 
as pretty as ever, if not even more so. I had admired her 
in a series of pictures with Jack Pickford, but seeing her 
in the flesh charmed me all over again. 

What struck me about Miss Huff was her sympathetic 
attitude toward several little children who took part in the 
production. She was genuinely interested in the young- 
sters and won them completely by her little kindnesses. 
This was not a play to the gallery, either, because there 
was no gallery, and I saw things that were not meant to be 
seen. 

Then came another Goldwyn picture, "Hidden Fires," 
with Mae Marsh. We went to Briarcliff Lodge, near 
Scarborough-on-the-Hudson, and passed a pleasant day in 



the country. We "extra" people were supposed to be gings, presumably a motor cycle costume, I sat breathless 

guests at the fashionable hotel, and we wandered through and fascinated. 

the grounds and lunched in the dining-room, made up For little Mrs. Ziegfeld is fully as bewitching in real 

for the movies, to the amusement of the genuine life as in reel life, marvelously dainty and grace- 



guests, who laughed and applauded. 

The note entered in my mental diary 
concerning Miss Marsh was the note 
of religion. I had heard that 
she was very devout, but was 
quite astonished when she ar- 
rived in a motor car with 
a priest. The priest had 
evidently accompanied 
Miss Marsh before, for 
he only looked on for a 
little while, and then re- 
tired into the background. 
Next came another 
World pic t u r e , Carlyle 
Black we 11, in "Making 
Good." The scene was in a 
cabaret, and we "extras" were 
patrons of the place, sitting at small 
tables and imbibing — cider. By way 
of camouflage, the apple juice was 
served in glasses of varying shape and 
size. There were champagne glasses, 
cocktail glasses and cordial glasses. 
The tablecloths and napkins were 
yellow, which color films much better than dead white. 

Mr. Blackwell kept very much to himself, attending 
strictly to business. I do not believe it was a pose or affec- 
tation on his part. He was quite unconscious of the rest 
of us, except insomuch as we lent "atmosphere" to the 
picture. He was 
supposed to be 
drunk, and he 
played the part ex- 
tremely well. 

My next en- 
gagement was with 
the Famous Play- 
ers. Mr. Davies, 
the casting di- 
rector, sent me to 
the Paragon Stu- 
dio, at Fort Lee, 
N. J., to be in a 
Billie Burke pic- 
ture. The scene 
was in the foyer of 
a hotel, and we 
supes lingered 
around, chatting 
with friends or 
glancing at maga- 
zines, in a naturaj 
manner. But when 
Billie Burke fin- 
ally appeared, in 
long leather leg- 




GOLDWYN 

THE HAND-MADE MOVIE 

Madge Kennedy, producer, is her 

own director and camera man. 




ON MEMORY'S SCREEN 



ful, with the prettiest smile and the sweet- 
est good humor. I even believe she 
could soften the stony heart of the 
grim personage who presides at 
the desk marked "Informa- 
tion" at the Paragon Studio, 
and of whom the "extra" 
people speak in awestruck 
whispers. 

My next picture was 
with the Famous Players 
once more, in an Alice 
Brady production called 
"The Golden Fleece." I 
had seen five stars and had 
looktd forward to seeing 
the sixth. But I was doomed 
to disappointment. My scene 
was in a law office, and the only 
others with me were the lawyer and 
the stenographer. The stenogra- 
pher, Gloria Goodwin, was young 
and pretty. I had a little "bit" to 
do with her — atiny"bit" — but it was 
my very first, so I almost forgot my 
disappointment at not seeing the star — the clever daugh- 
ter of a clever father. 

And that is as far as I have progressed — till now. 
I have been in the studios for three weeks and have been 
on six times, with three companies. And now I have 

been given a " bit" 
to do, so I suppose 
I will cease to be 
a supe and will 
have to write an- 
other article on 
"Stars I Have Sup- 
ported. " 

Perhaps I'll 
have to start draw- 
ing on my imagin- 
ation, instead of 
depending on ac- 
tual experience, 
and exaggerate 
like all the other 
"extras" ! One 
fellow told me that 
he had done a 
"bit" with Mary 
Garden, and the 
star had fallen in 
love with him; and 
another chap told 
me he had never 
taken a miserable 
(Contin iced on page 3%) 




\ 




(■ 



All knitters know the rule about raveling out, when 

a mistake is madeT and Harold Lloyd says it's 

no joke. A comedian in such a quandary 

will get what's due him — sympathy. 

Something for the Little Ones 

THE girl was helpless — a captive. And her captor? A 
gigantic brute of a man, as savage, as loathsome a 
creature as ever appeared on the screen. 

The girl weeps, struggles in the frenzy of fear, begs for 
mercy, pleads, but all to no purpose. The man finds enjoy- 
ment in her terror; he grins; he laughs. 

And what is this that is being shown? He is taking a 



meat ax — the man is — a meat ax from a table drawer, and 
is trying its blade on his finger nail. It is sharp — well he 
knows it. And swinging it as he strides, he crosses the 
room and grabs the girl with his free hand. 

Grabs her and thrusts her with brute strength upon a 
board table, his gorilla-like hands lifting her blond curls 
from her neck. 

She struggles again against hopeless odds, cries (you 
can see her tears), kicks frantically, but without avail; the 
brutal hand presses her down, down, and holds her there, 
while the ax is before her eyes. 

A super-thrilling screen drama of the underworld? 
Something about East Side dens, gangsters, kidnappers and 
gunmen? 

Not so. Not by any means so. 

It is but a scene from a movie for the children — a 
dramatization for the screen of one of childhood's favorite 
fairy tales, "Jack and the Beanstalk. " Pleasant dreams, 
children ! 

When Doug Leaves for Work 

Following is a specimen of the way Douglas Fairbanks, 
effervescent and acrobatic comedian, warms up for a day's 
work at the studio or elsewhere: 

Wakes, and from a position flat on his back vaults 
lightly over foot of bed to floor. 

Takes his morning before-breakfast exercise in family 
dining-room, climbing to plate rail and running around it 
twenty laps. 

Leaps to electrolier, thence to dining table, ultimately 
to rug. 

Bath and morning toilet. 

Breakfast preceded by secondary session of exercises ; 
climbs on fire escape to roof and goes hand over hand 
around cornice. 

Drops, unhurt, on passing hay wagon and runs briskly 
back to apartment, smiling and glowing with ruddy health. 

Breakfast with family, meals being interpolated with 
such feats as shooting lid off coffee pot, lassoing electric 
toaster, putting sixteen-pound grapefruit and cooking oat- 
meal over campfire built on dining-room floor. 

Playfully binds serving maid and stows her away on 
freight elevator. 

Drops from apartment window, ten stories, to Mexican 
saddle on back of waiting cow pony. 

Gathers up reins, and darting off to work, kidnaps en 
route a traffic cop. 

The Height of Devotion 

Big Marcus Brown adores his girl, 

His love for her is keen. 
He'll take her to a picture show, 

That he's already seen. 

Heard in the Studio 

Moving picture actor — Uncle Sam is going to make all 
the Germans in this country register. Then he is going to 
make the whole German nation register. 

Camera man — How's that? 

Moving picture actor — Register grief. 



LEM LUNKHEAD, 
POOR BUT TERRIBLY 
HONEST LUMBER- 
MAN • 




PRISCILLA VAN PRUNE, 
PERFECTLY GOOD 
DAUGHTER OF 
RICH MILL 
OWNER 






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"HOW DARE YOU 
INSULT A LADY.'"^ 




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"SAVED BY inches!'' 



THE 
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"THAT MAN STOLE' / 
YOUR MILLION BUCKS! 
SEARCH HI M.I'' — „ -H7 J J 



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LEM 
PARDONED 




"I'LL END IT ALL AND KICK ° ////¥* 
J)FF IN THIS SNOWBANK" /''' 








NICK TAKES AN 
OVERDOSE OF MORPHINE 



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THE PATH OF TRUE LOVE, AS IT IS MOVIED 




AN INTERRUPTED "CLOSE-UP 



The Vampire 




Oh, when I speak of Dora Dare, 

You know at once I mean 
That creature quite beyond compare, 

"The Vampire of the Screen" ! 
And yet I earnestly maintain 

She has in private life 
A reputation free from stain — 

The lady is my wife ! 



Whene'er a victim she enslaves, 

Whene'er a home she wrecks, 
Some preacher straightway rants and raves 

About "The Lure of Sex" ! 
I taught her how to act that way, 

In sin to live and die; 
I made her what she is to-day — 

Her manager am I ! 

She gets twelve hundred ev'ry week, 

And hands it all to me; 
No wonder I am smug and sleek, 

Contented as can be ! 
Her latest picture, "Queen of Hell," 

Is bound to make a hit; 
But when it comes to vampires, well, 

Some say that / am It ! 

— Harold Seton. 

What the Reelwrights Lack 

"I have here an idea for a play," said the moving pic- 
ture author to the producer. "In the first reel an oil tank 
blows up, in the second an entire railroad train falls into a 
gorge, in the third a huge steamer sinks at sea, in the 
fourth a volcanic eruption destroys a city, and in the fifth 



we have a battle scene calling 
for ten thousand supernumer- 
aries." 

' ' Entirely too small for me to 
fool with," said the producer, 
doing some rapid figuring with 
a pencil. "That play wouldn't 
cost more than five million dol- 
lars to stage, and I'm not consid- 
ering anything that involves an 
expenditure of less than twenty 
millions. The trouble with you 
authors is that you have no im- 
agination." 

Movie Salaries 

' ' I have been making a few 
calculations, " says the man with 
the serrated whiskers and the 
foreshortened pencil, looking up 
from his paper. "I have kept 
a record of the salaries paid 
moving picture stars, and find 
that they can be paid, provided 
we run the mint night and day 
and speed up the bank note print- 
ing plants to a double schedule. 
Within two years the aggregate 
sum paid moving picture stars 
would settle all the national debts 
of all the governments of the world, dig eight Panama 
canals and build and equip nine transcontinental railways, 
to say nothing of providing post office buildings and white 
marble libraries in all cities of over five thousand inhabi- 
tants. The only thing that bothers me is to figure how the 
banking facilities of the world can be made sufficiently 
extensive to handle the enormous amount of funds that 
will be deposited by the film actors and actresses. The 
responsibility attached to handling such centralized wealth 
is crushing." 




Where Has Mother Gone ? 




Russian Folk-Song recital, by Harold Lockwood's 
Russian Wolf Hound, at an informal studio tea. 



Animals 

ALTHOUGH they never employ press agents to spread 
extravagant rumors about their salaries, animals play 
an increasingly important part in the world of films. They 
range from white mice to lions and elephants. Times 
have changed since the days when the only animal on the 
stage was the stray cat which broke up the love scene. 





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Before taking part in an educational film, 
Elmendorf elephant is particular to 
wash behind, his ears. 



A bear possibility, in view 
of the serious short- 
age of camera 
men these 
days. 




Not even May Allison can 

make the Metro parrot 

look happy. Polly 

favors the spoken 

drama exclusively. 



As sick as a dog" isn't half 

bad, when it happens 

to be Francis X. 

Bushman's 

dog. 



The Last To Go 




44 



I 



'M all alone," the old man said, 
And placed a trembling hand 
Upon his white and nodding head; 
"Yes, all alone I stand. 



"They all were here a while ago; 

Their laughter rang so free. 
But now they're gone like last year's 
snow, 

And no one's left but me. 

"My wife, she went; my sister, too. 

I bade them both good-by. 
No wonder that I'm feeling blue; 

No wonder that I cry. 

"They said they'd see me soon again, 

My children blithe and bold — 
But, oh, the loneliness, the pain! 

'Tis hard, when one is old. 

"I never thought that I would be 

The last of all to leave; 
My portion but a memory, 

My privilege to grieve. 

"The children were so young, so strong, 

I looked to them for cheer 
And solace all my path along — 

And now they've left me here. 

"The house so empty and so still 

I grope my way around, 
The sparrows on the window sill 

The only cheerful sound. 

"Adieu, old home ! Adieu, adieu! 

It is no crime, I know ! 
The family's gone; I'm going, too — 

To the moving picture show !" _^. h. f. 




<2uya»5 £[e!T7 



Now, Henry, we will try these abbreviations. What is 
D. C. ?" 
" Dictrict of Columbia. " 
" And P. 6.?" 
"Post-office." 
"Good! And M. P.!" 
" Why — et — urn — niovin' pictures." 



Escaping Danger 



While visiting his nephew in the city, Uncle Sam Shim- 
merpate stopped in front of a motion picture billboard on 
which were displayed pictures of lions, tigers, elephants 
and other African wild animals. 

"Great guns, Henry," he said to his nephew, "I'm 
mighty glad I leave town Saturday afternoon!" 

"Why are you so anxious to get away?" asked the 
nephew. 

Pointing to the billboard, Uncle Sam read aloud the 
words: "To be released Saturday night." 




AFTER THE CALL FOR HELP 
Policeman — See here, now ! Is this the real thing or is it just a movie stunt ? 



"Oh, What 




JESTER COMEDY CO. 



He discovered that any bathing suit supplied at any 

beach can be relied on to make lean men look thinner, 

tall men more attenuated, and fat folks funnier. 

Twede-Dan and his girl start for the beach in his new 
car. Seven miles from the nearest supply they run out of 
gas. They make this distance by man-power, to discover 
the price beyond their means; but prohibition has pre- 
vailed, and liquor is cheap. They fill the tank, and the 



The athlete with the ninety -pound wallop finds it is no 

good when Twede-Dan is in real form and negotiates 

a settlement of their differences. 

known. Twede-Dan' s troubles are not lessened when his 
lady is overheard to explain that she will put her foot out, 
so he will know the right room. One slap-stick adventure 
follows another through gales of laughter, until the comedy 
ends with a surprise. 



A Guide to Screendom 



By LAWTON MACKALL 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIMIII1II1IIII1IIIIII 



IF YOU know the age of a character in screendom, you 
know everything about him. For the part that an in- 
dividual plays, in any correctly written scenario, and the 
sort of nature he discloses, are determined solely by the 
number of his years. A difference of a decade may take a 
man out of the hero class and put him in with the villains. 
The following chart, compiled by the census depart- 
ment of a large public library, gives a list of the ages per- 
missible in the movies, together with roles and personal- 
ities inevitable to them: 

3 years. Flaxen or golden haired child. Face and sex: 
as near as possible to those of an angel. Introduced 
for touch of pathos 
— asks, with childish 

* HMIIIIII 

innocence, "Where | 

is papa?" J 

6 years. Precocious lit- f 

tie girl. Heroine of [ 

psychological child | 

study, supposedly | 

humorous. 

10 years. Kid Brother. | 

Enters parlor to | 

harass sister's beau. | 

13 years. Hero of boy | 

drama. Comic | 

equipment: noisi- j- 

ness, chums with | 

peculiar nicknames, | 

and awkwardness in | 

presence of girls | 

and ' ' company. " I 

15 years. Younger Sis- | 

ter (Comedy edi- § 

tion). Excessively | 

girlish. Hair rib- f 

bons. Acts as ally 

of hero. 

18 years. Younger Sis- | 

ter. Impulsive, 1 
high-strung. Ruined | 
by deplorable exam- | 
pie of married 
sister. 

19 years. Oppressed Ingenue. Preferably an orphan. If 

that is not feasible, she should at least be alone and 
friendless in the great city. 

20 years. Popular Heroine, 1918 model. Shapeliness of 

figure, clearness of complexion, and regularity of teeth 
and features: indispensable. Color of hair and eyes: 
optional. Brains: secondary to costume. 

22 years. Noble Hero. Without fear, guile, or sense of 
humor. Saves life of Popular Heroine, or rescues In- 
genue from her oppressor. 

24 years. Snappy Hero. It makes no difference whether 
he is a fascinating young college man or a dashingly 



slangy young salesman; in either case he has no diffi- 
culty in landing a $200,000 order and the Popular 
Heroine at the same time. 
25 years. Young Wife, in problem drama. Either extrav- 
agant or misunderstood, and therefore an easy prey to 
the plutocratic blandishments of the Villain. 

29 years. Young Husband, in problem play. Tiring of 

the joys of home, he hearkens to the rustle of strange 
skirts. 

30 years. Woman with a Past. 

32 years, (a) With fur-lined overcoat. Rich and usu- 
ally unscrupulous Rival of Noble Hero. 

(b) Without 



111 iiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiidiiiiiiihiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiii 






fur-lined over- 




coat. Victim 




of Society or 




alcohol. 


35 


years. Female Vil- 




lain. 


40 


years. Male Villain. 




Oppressor of Op- 




pressed Ingenue. 


48 


years. Spiteful Old 




Maid. 


50 


years. Employer 




from whom Snappy 




Hero extracts a 




"raise." 



"Why do you always choose this theater, Elsie ?" 
' 'Cause it's — er — the darkest one in town, Alf!" 



| 52 years. A combination 
character (for the 
| sake of economy), 

| made up of "50 

years" and "54 
| years." 

| 54 years. Prospective 
| Father- in- law, 

| whom Snappy Hero 

astonishes into ca- 
pitulation. 
I 56 years. Elderly Hus- 
band, who misunder- 
stands Misunder- 
""" stood Wife. 

60 years. Austere 
Father, with white hair; side whiskers optional. 
65 years. Noble-souled Mother, with white hair parted in 

the middle. 
70 years. Noble-souled Father. If New England farmer, 
has chin beard ; if Southern Colonel, has flowing goatee. 
80 years. Knitting Grandmother or Patriarchal Grand 
father. 

SUMMARY : 

3-22 years. Period of likableness. 

25-32 years. Problematic Period. 

35-60 years. Period of villainy, spite, and oppression. 

65-80 years. Beautiful old age. 



■■ i minium iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiuiiiiuiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilii 



THE HUN AT PLAY 




THE Boches were bored. To be shut up for three months in a 
deserted chateau in the heart of Normandy was no small hard- 
ship for five Prussian officers accustomed to the gayeties of 
Berlin. To be sure, during their enforced stay, they had found 
entertainment in acts of vandalism, after the manner of their kind. 
Mutilated family portraits, priceless Flemish tapestries cut to ribbons, 
fine old mirrors cracked by pistol bullets, and the hacked and broken 
furniture that littered the spacious apartments of the chateau, all bore 
eloquent testimony to the favorite pastime of the Hun. But even this 
sport for the moment had palled. Outside the rain descended in torrents. 
As the brandy and liqueur passed from hand to hand, suddenly the Cap- 
tain has an inspiration. A soldier is despatched to a nearby city. In the 
evening he returns with five handsome girls. How the table is laid and 
the fun grows fast and furious as the champagne flows; how in an access 
of alcoholic patriotism toasts are proposed by the chivalrous Prussians 
reflecting on the bravery of the men and the virtue of the women of 
France ; what happens to the Baron at the hands of one of the girls — a 
patriot even if a fille de joie — is told as only Maupassant could tell it in 
the story Mademoiselle Fifi found in this superb Verdun Edition of 

The Complete Works of 
Guy de Maupassant 



| The First and Only Adequately 
Illustrated American Edition 

TT is a remarkable fact that, without 

I A exception, editions of Maupassant 

| heretofore accessible to the American 

| reading public have contained iliustra- 

| tions not only crude in execution but, in 

| their relation to the text, nothing less 

| but grotesque caricatures. 

This was a grave injustice to the 

[ author, as well as a reflection on the 

| great body of American artists, which 

| includes many of the world's most dis- 

| tinguished illustrators. 

The frontispiece illustrations for the 

i 17 volumes of the Verdun Edition of Guy 

| de Maupassant have been specially made 

1 by the talented American artist J. E. Al- 

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| tion of the author's works by their 

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| characters and types found in his stories. 

I A Specially Low Before-Publica- 
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| while the Verdun Edition is going through 

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Over 350 Novels, Stories, 
Poems 

GUY de MAUPASSANT observed life 
with a miraculous completeness 
and told what he saw with an intensity 
of feeling and with a precision which 
leaves the reader delighted and amazed. 
He was the most exact transcriber of life 
in literature. His novels and stories, 
all of which will appear in the Verdun 
Edition, leave the impression of the clear- 
est, frankest, most solid reality; as if 
each phase of life in every stratum of 
society had been detached piece by piece, 
stripped of all conventional complexity, 
and so presented to the reader. His was 
the incomparable gift of understanding 
life, which is the heritage only of the 
greatest geniuses. 

In comparison with his novels and 
stories all others appear artificial and 
labored. Maupassant does not preach, 
argue, concern himself with morals, and 
has no social prejudices. He describes 
nothing that he has not seen and shows 
men and women just as he found them. 
His language is so simple and strong 
that it conveys the exact picture of the 
thing seen. His choice of subjects is 
always redeemed by an exquisite irony 
and art. 



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The Best English Translation' 
Complete—Literal— Unexpurgated 

WHILE the eyes of the whole world are 
centered on our gallant ally, France, and 
her heroic struggle against a ruthless in- 
vader; with the ghastly picture before 
us of the brutal atrocities committed by an in- 
human foe on her civilian population, her women 
and young girls; while the smoke still rises from 
her destroyed cities and profaned temples, and 
the crash and thunder of her guns is heard from 
Calais to the Vosges as she hurls defiance at her 
treacherous enemy — nothing could be more time- 
ly than the publication of this Complete Collec- 
tion of the works of France's most gifted son, 
Guy de Maupassant, in whom realism reached its 
culminating point and the short story the perfec- 
tion of its art. and whose stories of the Franco- 
Prussian War, told with relentless realism, will 
be read now with a new interest and a fuller 
appreciation of their verity in the light of current 
events. But if such stories as Boule de Suif, 
Madame Sauvage, and Mademoiselle Fifi first 
raised Maupassant to the highest pinnacle of lit- 
erary fame, that position was rendered secure for 
all time by his other matchless series of novels 
and stories covering the widest range of human 
emotion and experience, in which every kind of 
character, good or bad, yielded material for his 
art. Literally translated, all these will appear in 
the Verdun Edition which will be published soon 
in a form unapproached by any previous edition 
ever offered on this side of the Atlantic. 



BRUNSWICK SUBSCRIPTION CO. F.F.-10 18 
Brunswick Building, New York City 

Without obligation on my part, please send full 
particulars, with special before - publication 
price and terms, of the Verdun Edition of the 
Complete Works of Guy de Maupassant, 17 vol- 
umes, cloth. If quotations are satisfactory I 
will notify you promptly to reserve a set for me 
for delivery when published. Otherwise, I 
waive all right to the special price quoted. 



I Name 

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1 City 

1 Occupation. 



.State. 



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IF there is one utterly good thing 
coming to us out of this war, it is 
that we are learning to understand our 
fellows. Having one of our own 
"Over There" gets our sympathises 
onto a practical working basis with 
the boys here. 

This story doesn't relate exclusively 
to movie folks, but so many are in the 
service that it is likely to interest fans. 
There is a canteen of the National 
League for Women's Service at Thirty-, 
ninth Street and Madison Avenue, in 
New York. It provides a substantial 
meal at noon and at night for twenty- 
five cents. It consists of soup, roast, 
three vegetables, salad and dessert. 
And between whiles, if needed, there 
are quick -lunch possibilities of ham 
and eggs. About 150 soldiers and sail- 
ors, our own and our allies, are served 
at each meal. 

The canteen is presided over by seven 
lieutenants, one for each day of the 
week. They are women of independ- 
ent means and executive ability. The 
officer-of-the-day has her own corps of 
helpers. Usually she chooses from her 
own social set those who have the time 
and can afford to serve without mone- 
tary compensation. 

On one of the hot, hot August days 
an appeal came in to them from a 
neighboring canteen for extra help. An 
extra hundred had to be served on short 
notice. A few volunteered, and their 
co-workers willingly undertook the ex- 
tra labor involved in their going. Some 
of the guests "caught on" and helped. 
The lieutenant for that day took the 
volunteers in her automobile, doing her 
own driving, up to the needy neighbor. 
And, as is usual in such cases, every- 
thing ended up all right. 

Returning, this lieutenant, who is 
rather a great lady, head of a hospita- 
ble household where "help" is never a 
problem because workers are many, 
noticed two sailors who looked weary 
and friendless. She stopped to talk with 
them and presently took them on and 
gave them dinner at the canteen, for 
she had discovered they were San Diego 
survivors who had been unable to get a 
place to sleep. 

You can think what you like of the 
luck of surviving, it's an involuntary 
honor that finds a man all unprepared. 
And it may be you think, because the 
need is so obvious, that surely there 



must have been some place for housing 
them. The fact is, there was no such 
place. And it is also true that these 
boys of ours suffer much real hardship 
because war needs have grown so fas* 
that they cannot all be met, unless eac 
one of us appoints himself a commit 
tee of one and charges that committe. 
with the duty of getting things done. 

Individuals ought to forego their own 
sleep until any they know of that need 
shelter have been provided for. The 
Friends' meeting-house, opened one 
night last June as an emergency meas- 
ure to shelter 150 needy ones, has been 
in use for these boys every Saturday, 
Sunday and holiday night since and is 
always full. 

Do your bit. 

What the War Has Not Done 
to the Films 

( Continued from page 6) 

Lila Lee, Lasky's youngest star, has 
just finished "The Cruise of the Make- 
Believe" and has won the hearts of 
everyone in the studio, from the direct- 
ors down to the prop men. 

Douglas Fairbanks, instead of tak- 
ing a rest after finishing the most 
restless of all his comedies, "Bound in 
Morocco, ' ' has plunged into ' ' He Comes 
Up Smiling." Allan Dwan, his direct- 
or, says it's good, though "somewhat 
quiet," probably meaning that he does 
not climb more than five church stee- 
ples, knock down more than ten bullies 
or rescue more than six damsels — in 
any one reel. 

Dorothy Gish is terribly peeved, be- 
cause, having made such a success of 
the militant little street gamin in 
"Hearts of the World," she is slated 
to fight her way through the rest of her 
screen career, bidding good-by forever 
to demureness and gentleness. She has 
commenced with " Battling Jane, " who 
pummels through life with a bicycle, a 
grin and an adopted baby as her chief 
assets. 

They had a wonderful time at the 
Chaplin studio when the Divine Sarah 
came out to visit "Chariot," as she 
calls him, while on her Orpheum tour. 
He was so fussed trying to talk French 
and understand Madame's English, that 
he almost forgot to turn out his toes 
and tip his hat in the subsequent scenes. 
(Continued on page 8?) 







MOON COMEDIES 



There is never a dull moment in ' ' His Finish ' ' from the time when the father 

of the girl institutes a contest between her rival suitors. She agrees to 

marry the one who devises the best method to catch the Kaiser. 

Could You Use an Extra Hundred Dollars ? 




T 



^HAT sum will buy a Liberty Bond, and here's an easy 
way for five of you to earn it. Five prizes, each $100 
cash, will be paid for criticisms of Moon Comedies, 
shown in most movie theaters of New York and vicinity. See 
them, write your criticism briefly, and send to ' ' Contest Editor, 
Moon Comedies, care Sunshine Films, Inc., 126 West Forty- 
sixth Street, New York City, N. Y." Your full name and 
home address must be on the manuscript. The contest closes 
October 1st, and payment to the five fortunate ones will be made October 15th, 
1918. The judges— Mr. M. Binham, 22 North William Street, and Mr. S. Wald, 
2653 Decatur Street, N. Y. City, and Mr. H. Jensen, 3 7- A Cooper St., Brooklyn — 
who have no connection with Sunshine Films, Inc., will designate the five most 
skillfully constructed criticisms. In order to compete it is not necessary to scs these 
pictures. Pamphlets descriptive of comedies as they appear are obtainable free of 
charge at ticket offices of moving picture houses and at the above-mentioned office 
of Sunshine Films, Inc. 




' Their Unexpected Job ' ' pictures the fortunes — and misfortunes — of 

two alert comedians who read about the ' ' Fight or Work ' ' order, 

and do not feel like doing either- Their adventures include 

this entertainment in their honor given by the lady who 

aided in their supposed rescue from a submarine. 




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Nuxated Iron will increase the 
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weeks' time in many instances." 



Manufacturers' Note : Nuxated Iron rec- 
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W. S. S. WORTH $5.00 JANUARY 1, 


1923 



lllllllllllllllllllll II Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Ill:;illlll!lllllllllllll!|lllll»lllll l :illlilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllilllllllllHlllllllllir 



What the War Has Not Done 
to the Films 

(Continued from page 30) 
Besides, he has always nursed a secret 
hankering to play Hamlet, and the fa- 
mous tragedienne's visit aggravated the 
longing. But brace up, Charlie; Ma- 
dame Bernhardt said she wished she 
could do "zat walk, so drole, so 

fonnie" 

Out at the Sennett Fun Factory they 
are grinding out comedies at the rate 
of two a month. Polly Moran has left 
for Australia, giving as a parting mes- 
sage that she was tired of having her 
ears pulled out by the roots; so Ben 
Turpin, of the eccentric orbs, has lost 
a side-kicker. However, while Louise 
Fazenda remains, there is hope. She 
is one of the few girls who, being born 
to good looks, are not afraid to sacri- 
fice them to the cause of art and laugh- 
ter. She and Ford Sterling have just 
finished a hot-weather chaser called 
"The Summer Girls," with a bevy of 
bathing beauties, a herd of seal and a 
pelican named "Ralph." 

Theda Bara, forsaking villainy for 
the time being, has plunged into com- 
edy, and is assisted, in the present pic- 
ture, by her sister, who is golden- 
haired and Theda-eyed, and by hei 
namesake, a pet bear, which was given 
her by her regiment, "The Grizzlies," 
before they left for France. Her last 
feature, "Salome," will have a grand 
premiere in Los Angeles, September 
9th, and Hooverizes on nothing but 
costumes — an economy which is 
Theda's specialty. . 

In passing, it might be well to men- 
tion that the movies aren't dead — yet. 

Stars I Have Suped With 

(Continued from, page 2D 
five-dollar-a-day job before, although 
several others assured me that this 
individual had been taking five- 
dollar jobs for the last three years. A 
youth who said "I seen" and "we 
was" assured me he was a college 
graduate. But the most diverting bit 
of gossip I heard was that Mabel Nor- 
mand, now a well-known star, had for- 
merly gone on as an " extra' ' ! She, 
too, should write an article ! 

We All Do 

She (at the movie show) — What part 
do you like best? 

He (as he puts his arm around her) 
— The close-ups. 




DOWN at Washington stands the Nation's capitol. It is more than a pile of stone. 
It is a monument to an idea: "The people are the Government." Under no other 
idea is there so great an opportunity to work out individual prosperity and individual 
happiness. 



Back of the American idea suddenly has arisen the black 
menace of the opposing Prussian idea. Under it the 
people are not the Government. Under it the people live 
and prosper, or sacrifice and die, by grace of " Me und 
Gott." 

Militarism is the mailed fist which supports the divine- 
right Government. It is typified in Hindenburg. 

What a contrast is offered to Hindenburg's militarism 
by Pershing's military ! Freedom's military is the people 
embattled. Autocracy's militarism is the people driven. 

Our boys in France and Italy are the expression in 
military form of the people's own stern will. When 
Pershing speaks of them to President Wilson, he says, 
" Sir, our armies." The German soldiers are the servants 
of militarism. Of them Hindenburg says to the Kaiser, 
"Majesty, your armies." 

The billions of dollars we are gathering here at home 
for military purposes have no taint of militarism on a 
single coin. 



Germany began her war with no plans for elaborate 
taxation of her people; the Junkers expected to saddle 
the cost of the war upon quickly conquered nations. Not 
so does a free people make war ! From the start we have 
gone down into our own pockets for every cent we ex- 
pend; we have never thought of taking; we have thought 
only of spending our blood and our treasure to protect 
our ideal of free national life. 

The menace of Hindenburg makes no American tremble. 
But it makes us grit our teeth and either fight or give! 
What the Government (which is the people) wants to 
borrow, we, the people, as individuals will lend. 

The menace of Hindenburg shall cease to exist in the 
world even as a shadow ; and we shall return to our 
individual pursuits under the protection of our national 
ideal successfully defended ; and, please God, other 
nations, as the result of this struggle, shall join us and 
our already free Allies in the enjoyment of our blood- 
bought and blood-held freedom. 



BUY U. S. GOV'T BONDS FOURTH LIBERTY LOAN 



Contributed through Division of Advertising 




United States Govt. Comm. on Public Information 



This space contributed for the Winning of the War by 

The Publishers of FILM FUN. 



Study Piano With 
World Authority At 
43 Cents A Lesson 

LEARN IN QUARTER USUAL TIME, 
RIGHT IN YOUR OWN HOME 




DR. QUINN AT HIS PIANO. 

From the Famous Sketch by Schneider, Exhibited 

at the St. Louis Exposition. 



"Impossible!" some people said at first, but there is a 
VITAL REASON that made it possible; and now Dr. Quinn 
teaches piano or organ to more persons than were ever taught 
by one man before. 

You learn more thoroughly and play more artistically. 
Every state in the Union and every province in Canada con- 
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To Learn Piano or Organ." 

Recommended by Distinguished Musicians 

Dr. Quinn's Method represents the best thought of the pres- 
ent day; and the very highest musical standards. It is endorsed 
by many distinguished artists and heads of state conservatories. 
You learn faster, not because anything is omitted, but because 
you use every possible scientific assistance — many of which are 
entirely unknown to the average teacher. One lesson with Dr. 
Quinn is worth a dozen ordinary lessons. Write to-day for 
free particulars. 

The Colorotone Saves Months of Time 



Dr. Quinn's patented invention the Colorotone sweeps away 
playing difficulties that have troubled students for generations. 
The important musical subject of TRANSPOSITION— usually 
a "nightmare" to students — is made easy and fascinating. By 
using the Colorotone you are able, in your third lesson, to play 
an interesting piece not only in the original key but in all other 
keys as well. This one fact saves you months of valuable time. 
The Colorotone is patented and cannot be used by any other 
school or teacher. 



Finger Action Shown by Moving Pictures 

With Dr. Quinn's fifth lesson, he sends you another im- 
portant and exclusive invention, Quinn- Dex, a mechanical 
"movie." It shows you visually every movement of Dr. 
Quinn's wrists, hands and fingers at the keyboard. You see 
the fingers move, just as if thrown on the moving picture screen. 
Correct finger movements are vitally important, and you will 
find that Dr. Quinn's movements are many years in advance of 
those usually taught. Furthermore, you do not have to repro- 
duce Dr. Quinn's movements from MEMORY — which naturally 
cannot always be accurate. Instead, you have the correct 
models right before your eyes during every minute of practise. 
You follow them minutely and exactly, without any chance of 
error or misunderstanding. Whereas, without Quinn-Dex, and 
by all other methods, much of your time would be unavoidably 
spent in correcting bad habits acquired through faulty practise. 
This discourages more students and wastes more time than any 
other single difficulty. Quinn-Dex does away with it entirely. 
You cannot obtain anything like Quinn-Dex except from Dr. Quinn. Moving 
pictures have never before been applied to piano instruction. Quinn Dex is 
operated easily and simply by hand, and even a child can successfully use it. 
Quinn-Dex is fully explained in the free booklet 
"How To Learn Piano or Organ." Write to-day. 

Old-Fashioned Methods Doomed 




iiiiNimnmimiiiiPirniiimi iNiiimiimiiiiNi"i!i'i'-i 



FREE BOOK COUPON 



The old way of studying with a so-called "private 
teacher" by the "oral" method is rapidly being dis- 
carded, and anybody can see why. If you want a 
teacher "all to yourself" and yet can afford only Si. 
to $5. per lesson, it goes without saying that you can 
obtain only third-rate instruction. No true authority 
could give you his entire, exclusive attention for so 
small a fee. On the other hand, by enrolling with 
this Conservatory and joining Dr. Quinn's Personal 
Instruction Class you obtain high-grade instruction, 
and as much of Dr. Quinn's time as you really need, 
at less than 43 cents a lesson. This rate is just one- 
half the Conservatory's standard fee and is made for 
a short time only, in connection with our Twenty- 
Fifth Anniversary. 

By the old-fashioned "oral" method at least half your "private teacher's" 
time is absolutely thrown away in giving you instructions which could just as 
easily be put into writing. Of course, you can't remember a quarter of what he 
tells you. so most of your next lesson is taken up going over the same material 
again. This truly sinful waste is entirely done away with by Dr. Quinn's scien- 
tific Written Method. Your instructions are all in writing for reference any time, 
day or night. Nothing is forgotten, nor unnecessarily repeated. Your share of 
Dr. Quinn's time can then be used in the way that does you the most real benefit. 
In all truly essential ways you will be in closer touch with him than if he were in- 
structing you by the "oral" system. The "oral" system has long ago been abandoned 
in teaching all other great Arts and Sciences and it is doomed in Music as well. 

Learn At Home, In Spare Time 

In thoroughness and in the subjects covered, Dr. Quinn's Course corresponds 
to the usual three-year term of study. Yet it can easily be mnstered in seventy- 
five weeks, and many students finish it in less than a year. The Course is entire- 
ly different from all others, not onL in the exclusive features already mentioned, 
but in many other ways as well. No matter where you live, you can get full 
benefit from the Course. Dr. Quinn has many fine students in South America, 
Africa, the Philippines, Australia, Fnrope. Asia and Cuba, as well as in the 
United States. Canada and Mexico. We will gladly refer you to any number of 
our graduates who will soon convince you of the satisfying results they obtained 
from Dr. Quinn. 



Investigate Without Cost 



QUINN CONSERVATORY, Studio ZW, 
Social Union Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

Please send me, without cost or obligation, = 
your free booklet, "How To Learn Piano or ! The Course is for either beginners or experienced players, from 15 to over 60 

Organ," nnd full particulars of your Course and 1 years of age. Men and women who have failed bvall other methods have quickly 

special reduced Tuition Offer. I and . easily attained success when studying with Dr. Quinn. You can progress as 

1 rapidly or as slowly as you wish. Earn money by professional playing or by giv- 

1 ing lessons to others, if you desire, even before you complete the Course. All 

N ame 1 necessary music is included without extra charge. Diploma and degree granted. 

| The free booklet "How To Learn Piano or Organ" contains fi4 pages of interesting 

[ and valuable information about learning piano. It fully explains Dr. Quinn's 

1 system, gives the records of his students and manv testimonials from well-known 

1 people. It tells you of the Conservatory's Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Offer by 

. , v | which vou can obtain Dr. Quinn's lessons at half the usual Tuition Fee if you act 

Address I promptly. Investigate without cost or obligation by writing for the booklet. It 

! is absolutely free. 

I MARCUS LUCIUS QUINN CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

1 Studio ZW, Social Union Bldg., Boston, Mass. 



ilm 



And The Magazine 
of Fun, Judge's 
Library and Sis Hopkins' 
Own Book Combined 



tin 



Price 15 Cents 
NOVEMBER 
1 9 1 8 



NOTICE TO 
READER. 

When you finish read- 
ing tliis magazine, place 
a one-cent stamp on this 
notice, mail the maga- 
zine, and it will be 
placed in the hands of 
our soldiers or sailors 
destined to proceed 
overseas. 
NO WRAPPING 
-NO ADDRESS. 



A Monthly Reel 
of Laughs 



1 




COPYRIGHTED, 1918, BY FILM FUN 



V 



"THEY WON'T LET ME BE A DRILL SERGEANT" 




m 



m 



M 



at do we see tonight? 



ALL right, pile in ! Plenty of room 
for five in the good old bus, so pile 
in, all seven of you! What do we 
see tonight? We don't know yet. But 
the best theatres in town are showing 
Paramount and Artcraft motion pictures. 

-H * -a 

And after ten minutes or so you are 
still John H. Everyman of No. 19 Henry 
Street, in the same suit of clothes, — 

— only you don't know it. 

According to your friends and rela- 
tives, there you are in your chair. But 
as far as you yourself are concerned, you 
are somebody else entirely; and some- 
where else altogether. One minute you 
are helping the unfortunate comedian run 
a little faster, and the next you are slam- 
ming the door in his face. 

You, and at your time of life! 

Full-grown and sophisticated and eve- 
rything — and look at you! 



(paramount*** GHaxdt 

Motion (pictures " 

Three Ways to Know *Z*>*™£ '2%f„?ZZ2 






MARK 



1* 



One — by seeing these 

trade - marks or 

names in the 

advertisements o f 

your local theatres. 



two — by seeing these 

trade - marks or 

names on the front 

of the theatre or in 

the lobby. 



FAMOUS PLAYERS -LASKY CORPORATION 

ADOLPH ZUKOR Pres. JESSE L.LASKY Via Pres. CECIL B.DE MULE Director Qeneral 
. '"NEW YORKy • 




FOREMOST STARS. SUPERBLY DIRECTED, IN CLEAN MOTION PICTURES 




Yes, and you can be envied! You have 
proved that you are not so fire-proof blase 
as you might be. 

Unconsciously you have proved another 
thing, too; the vital difference between 
Paramount and Artcraft motion pictures 
and run-of-the-ruck "movies." 

If you recall which motion pictures 
were notable in the stories they were 
built upon, masterly in the way the 
scenes were built on those stories, su- 
preme in the fame and talent of the stars 
who played them and in the genius of the 
directors who staged them, and clean 
throughout — you will also recall that 
"Paramount" and "Artcraft" were the 
names under which they were featured. 

That is why you tell yourself your two 
hours have been well worth while, as you 
pack all seven of them back into the 
machine. Let 'em jabber, back there in 
the tonneau! It's a good old world! 



three— *>y seeing these 

trade - marks or 

names flashed o n 

the screen inside 

the theatre. 



©P.B4 3 70 9 
Obi Id Ibio 








Geraldine Farrar is hostess, and among her guests are Director Reginald Barker, Milton Sills, leading man, 
and Thomas Santchi, the villain. Cody, Wyo., is even hotter than New York in summer, but the com- 
pany made the trip to film certain scenes in "The Hell Cat," and evidently they enjoyed it. 



Film Fun 

225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

An Independent Illustrated Monthly Magazine 
Devoted to the Best Interests of All 
Motion Picture Art and Artists 

NOVEMBER-1918 



o 



n 



n 



Where and 1Vl l at Is the West? . 2 

Editorial Comment. Moving Picture of a Snore .... 3 

Flashbacks . h. 

The SLr Bravest Men in the Movies 5 

The Tortured Soul. We Wonder if It Is. A Natural Query. The 

Movie 6 

Why Is Charlie Chaplin t .... Emma-Lindsay Squier 7 

From the. Travelogues of Happy Hooligan 9 

Plenty of Pep in "Sauce for the Goose." A picture review of Con- 
stance Talmadge'x latest photoplay 10 

A Heart Interest Comedy. Their Thanksgiving Prayer. Movie 

Manners 11 

Enlightenment Lawton Mackall hi 

The End of the Reel. .... Jamrs Montgomeky Flagg IS 

Rubaiyat of a Scotch Highball. An 0. Henry photoplay reviewed Ik 

"Gee, This is Just .Like a Movie .'" Ray Kohn 15 



Showing Up the Hick Town — Neiv York. A Flagg comedy picture 

reviewed .16 

A Chase Picture with Billie Burke in the Lead. A picture review 

of a sparkling comedy 11 

Movies from Film Fun's Screen IS 

Song of the Extra. Action. A Prophetic Motion Picture . . 19 
No, It'ls Not William J. Bryan; It Is Fred Stone. A tale of " The 

Goat"— his latest release SI 

Suping for Tourneur Harold Seton 22 

Have You an Eye for an Eye t 23' 

Lest the Audience Forget A. H. F. 24 

A Lesson in Geology 25 

Markowitz and Henry Discuss the Movies . . . Lou Rab 26 

A Moving Pitcher 28 

In Our Town J. G. G. 30 

Who 's Who and Where 31 



Published monthly by LESLIE-JUDGE COMPANY, Publishers, 225 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

John A. Sleicher, President Reuben P. Sleicher, Secretary A. K; Rollauer, Treasurer Grant Hamilton, Art Director 

Jessie Niles Burness, Editor A. H. Folwell, Associate Editor 

Copyright, 1918', by Leslie-Judge Company, Publishers Title registered as a trade-mark 

Entered at the post-office at New York as second-class matter 

Advertising Offices: 225 Fifth Ave., New York City; Marquette Bldg., Chicago, 111.; Walker Bldg., Boston, Mass.; Henry Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

FILM FUN is printed by The Williams Printing Company 



$150 



^ a year 



Number 355 



15c a copy 



Where and What is the West, Anyway ? 



iiit[iJiiiliii]iiliiilUlllli]iliiiii!ii|[iiniitii]iii[iiii;iii]ll[iilililllllliilllli]l]lliiiiiiuiiii:iiiii;iiiiMi:nii:)[tiiiii!iiiiiiiiiMi in inn 



iiiiiimiiiriiiimiiiiiiiiiii 



The Eastern man's idea of the West is becoming 
more and more confused, and for that the movies are 
responsible. Just as enterprising Chambers of Com- 
merce or Boards of Trade were assuring him that the 
Woolly West and Wild was a thing of the past, existing 
only in dime novels, perfectly reputable movie stars be- 



gan to show him a West that was Wilder and Woollier 
than anything the dime novels had ever pictured. The 
accompanying views represent the Easterner's state of 
mind with regard to that mysterious region, the West. 
It is a sort of fifty-fifty split between civilization and 
Dead-Man's Gulch. 



uiiinuiiiiiiiiuillllillllllllllllllllliniiiiiiluiMiiiiiiiiiiinMiiiiiiiii^'iiniuiiiiiiiuuiiiiiiiviiinniiiiiijiiiiiiuiiiiiiniiiiiuiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiii'uiMiillliiiiiii mi imiiiiiimn iiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiimiimmiiiimiiim i in mi u u u i iiiiii!iiijijmiiiiiiiiimimimMiimiii]mmmiii]m.'"i"Mi:>!iii unini i iiiiiimiiiiimmiiiimini 




Uiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiimiiinuj 

1 The rough fron- 1 
i tier town of San j 
| Francisco. \ 
1 Bill Hart, no- % 
I torious West- 1 
| em bad man, I 
S taking a con- 1 
stitutional. J 

iii i tt ti i] 1 1 1 1 1 1 in 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii mi 1 1 1 1 1 tin 1 1 1 in tii 1 1 1 imii i inn 1 1 1 1 in i 



J0 



Uiiiiiiiniimimiiiuiimiiiimiiiiii mimmniitim 



| Every -day | 
| street scene in | 
| the wilds of I 
j Denver. Nate | 
| Salisbury , | 
| leading western j 
| man-about- | 
| town. | 

miiiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiimiiiiiiiimiiimmmmmiiitf 



J& 



View of Tacoma, on the lawless outskirts of civilization. Roy 
Stewart about to lasso a Maverick trolley car. 



EDITORIAL 



No Plots and Few Plotters 

ANOTHER prophecy has been fulfilled: a dearth of 
scenarios is hampering the motion picture indus- 
try very seriously. The matter is very well worth 
careful consideration by all who aspire some time 
to write the great play. Fame and fortune await the writer 
who will submit acceptable ideas for photoplays. Tech- 
nical experts will make them over into scenario form. 

Authors manifest no desire to come to the rescue, al- 
though diligent effort is made to enlist their co-operation. 
One reason for this is that they cannot be persuaded that 
the practice of pirating stories and ideas, which prevailed 
formerly in many studios, and the fifty dollars a reel or 
even less, which was grudgingly paid, are things of the 
past. Then, too, the majority of them are prejudiced 
against pictures, which isn't altogether surprising when 
one considers the liberties taken with a story in adapting 
it to the screen. 

The demand for plots must be supplied. There are up- 
ward of seventeen thousand picture houses throughout (.he 
country, and any number of vaudeville houses use films in 
their programs. Audiences have come to regard pictures 
as much of a necessity as daily bread or a place to sleep. 

There never has been, and may never be again, the 
wealth of material, developed by war conditions, which is 
now available. The veneer 
of civilization has been 
scraped. Men and women 
live and work and fight 
as their natures dictate, 
and the simple truth about 
things as they are can be 
made into a masterpiece 
by anyone of vision. Pro- 
ducers are willing to pay 
what they have to in order 
to get good plays. One 
thousand for a plot and ten 
thousand for screen rights 
to a "best seller" or a 
stage success are prevail- 
ing rates just now. 

The right solution, 
which must prevail event- 
ually, is payment for scen- 
arios on a royalty basis, 
such as publishers and 
authors find satisfactory. 
Who will be first among 
producers to invite photo- 
playwrights and authors to 
submit scenarios under 
such an arrangement? 
Film Fun will be glad to 
publish his name and the 
success of his experiment. 
That is fair, and will win. 



o 1 




MOVING PICTURE OF A SNORE 

" Animated Nature," which might have come from the 
Educational Film Co., but didn't. 



Revelations 

k NE of the interesting phases for the moment in this 
great enterprise is the universal recognition of the 
fact that all is not well with pictures. 

The reasons ascribed and the remedies suggested are 
numerous and various. We are told that by revealing too 
much of the technical side of picture making and telling 
the truth about the idols, so that they are made to seem 
just ordinary human beings, we writing folks have stripped 
pictures of the glamour and romance which the average 
motion picture fan requires. They tell us that this is to 
blame a good deal more than war economies and advanced 
charges for admission for existing conditions. 

If you want to find out how far from the fact that is, 
go with any fan you like to a Chaplin first night, or a 
"Hearts of the World" thousandth night, for that matter. 
There is no magic make-believe about the way Chaplin 
works up a surprise climax to each of his scenes, and notn- 
ing that may not be revealed in Griffith's heart appeal. It 
is all open and aboveboard. The secret which few of us 
grasp is this: that both these directors have sincerity and 
a fine understanding of human nature. They aim at the 
heart, rather than the head, and so they get us. The 
insistent demand for the product of each of these master- 
craftsmen begins to wane whenever this appeal is lacking. 

They've both had ups and 
downs, and they would 
testify, from their own 
experience, that financial 
success is greatest where 
it is given least consider- 
ation. The box office can 
be relied on for a just 
verdict. . 

Lasting popularity in 
pictures depends primar- 
ily on just that one thing 
— sincerity. When we get 
this in the story, the direc- 
tion, the action and the 
technique of production, a 
screen classic necessarily 
results. Every time this 
happens, it calls forth a 
new demonstration of an 
old truth — that you can't 
keep the people away 
from where they want to 
go. 

A recent report of the 
National Board of Review 
discloses that 1,010 feat- 
ure films were passed with 
their approval. The screen 
classics that deserve to en- 
dure can be counted on the 
fingers of one hand. 



Flash Backs 



Some News Nuggets and Critical Quips 

A picture has just been completed in which the leader, 
"That Night," does NOT appear. We didn't think it 
possible ! 



Roscoe Arbuckle says he finds film life no bed of roses. 
'Tiswell. Considering "Fatty's" heft, it would be mighty 
rough on the roses. 

What's your favorite color? Charlie Chaplin has two 
— the green-and-yellow tint of the leaves of the Mazuma 
bush. Ours is Pearl White. 

Billy West has written a waltz ! Wouldn't that strangle 
y.our baby grand? Can it be the title is "I Use Ev'rything 
of Chaplin's But His Brain"? 

News dispatches from an upstate town tell of two boys 
who rifled the safe in a motion picture theater. There are 
all sorts of ways to "break into the movies." 

Theda Bara has colored blood in her veins. Hey ! hold 
on ! We mean BLUE blood ! Yessir, she is a descendant 
of an Egyptian queen, and she won't be a bit mad if you 
ask her about it. 

A descendant of George Washington's secured a position 
in the publicity department of a film company. He lasted 
two minutes. "Truth is mighty"— out of place in a pub- 
licity department. 

j Some recent punk scenarios seem to have been written 
around the gowns of the leading lady. A poet once sang: 
"The beautiful things are the things we do; they are never 
the things we wear!" 

A recent Dorothy Dalton picture features a fox hunt 
and a Georgia camp meeting as they used to have them 
long ago. Did she have to go " 'way down South" on loca- 
tion for those scenes? Well, California's prohibition now, 
you know. 

Winifred Westover, arriving back in Santa Barbara 
after her work with William Russell in the new play, has 
bought a new home and a new car. Wherefore we think 
that "All the World to Nothing" must be a pretty safe bet 
■ — for Miss Westover, anyhow. 

Al Ray had one exceptionally busy week, wherein he 
robbed a bank, lost $300 playing poker, and, in fact, he 
acted like he didn't care a thing about what the censors 
would do to "Somewhere in Kansas" when that film tries 
to show in the Sunflower State. 

Some actresses break into the pictures, and some just 
fall in, but Carmel Myers is the only one on record who 
chewed her way in. It was her cute cuddling of her cud 
of gum in her first picture, "The Heiress of Coffee Dan's, " 
that interested the directors and boosted her to stardom. 

Bessie Barriscale is bothered. She likes to give the 
reply courteous to all of the many letters she receives from 
admirers. Recently one came from far-away Japan, say- 
ing: "I would appreciate highly a photograph of your 
latest condition." What to do? 



In "Friend Husband" Director Badger, we are told, had 
to have the music of several 'cellos to compel the frog to 
croak, as the scenario required. No Hooverizing to be 
noticed about this, but probably they've added a trained 
frog to the studio pets, and the pay-roll, for future re- 
quirements. 

Word comes from the West Coast studios that "Pep- 
per, " the famous Paramount-Mack Sennett cat so popular 
in comedies in which Louise Fazenda appears, has aban- 
doned her stage career, having recently become the mother 
of six " pepperettes. " 

Everybody knows the California average per year of 
sunny days is 312. Also that it never rains during the dry 
season. Wherefore the night scene in a rainstorm called 
for in the script of "The Gray Parasol" required mighty 
striving by a large force from Triangle's technical depart- 
ment. The results were so good they evidently peeved old 
Pluvius, for a few hours after everybody had gone home, 
drenched but happy, a real deluge descended on Culver 
City and vicinity. And Director Windom is claiming now 
that he is the real, sure-enough rain maker. 




"HeddaNova, in 'By the World Forgot.'" 
Let's hope the line's an error, due to haste. 

If it be true, we venture on the spot 

To say the world displays the worst of taste. 



The Six Bravest Men in the Movies 

They Dare Face America in the Make-up of the Kaiser 




It's a wise Crown Prince 
who would know his own 
father from Lawrence 
Grant in "To Hell with the 
Kaiser. ' ' 



John Sainpolis in The Big- 
gest Ga me Ever Played. ' ' A 
faithful replica of the Kai- 
ser's ' 'I- can • see - what-is- 
coming-to-me" look. 



Rupert Julian steels him- 
self to receive 100,000,000 
American hisses nightly as 
the beast in "The Beast of 
Berlin. 




William — not Wilhelm — 
Burress as the Kaiser in 
' 'Kultur. ' ' He is having a 
struggle not to look pleasant. 



Something very choice in 

Frightfulness. Walter M. 

Lawrence's interpretation 

of "The Prussian Cur." 



When it comes to the "Me 
undt Gott" look, you must 
hand it to Ray Hanford in 
The Geezer of Berlin. ' ' 



The Child in Back of You 



66 T> UT, mamma, why does the man wear earrings? And 



B l 



why does he walk that way?" 

{Reply inaudible.) 

"But why didn't he stab the lady when he had her alone 
in the cellar? Didn't you think he was going to?" 

(Reply indistinct.) 

"Well, who are the men in the automobile? And why 
is the cowboy chasing them?" 

(Reply gaining strength. ) 

"Is the cowboy a robber, mamma? Why don't they tie 
him to a tree, like they did in the pictures last week? 
Why don't they, mamma?" 



(Reply whispered, but vigorous. ) 

"Is there a choo-choo car in this picture, mamma? I 
like choo-choo pictures." 

(Reply short and snappy. ) 

"Why isn't there, mamma?" 

(Reply brief and unsatisfactory. ) 

"Yes, they could, mamma. They could tie him to the 
track and let the — O-o-o-o-o-o, mamma, look! What 
made the automobile turn upside down in the water?" 

(Reply evasive and inclined to be sketchy. ) 

"But, mamma, where is the lady in the old mill? Did 
(Continued on page 32) 




The Tortured Soul 

A WOMAN clad in scant 
array 
Peered out in the dusky 
night, 
With eyes that glowed like 
burning coals 
And a face that was ghastly 
white. 

She stumbled down the rocky 
road 
To a cliff o'erlooking the sea, 
And gazing long in the swirling depths, 
She laughed in mirthless glee. 

"Oh, false and empty world!" she cried. 

"Where in thy boundless part 
Can I find rest for my tortured soul — 

Peace for my broken heart?" 

She clasped her hands and muttered a prayer 

And raised her eyes to the sky, 
Then tottered over the crumbling edge 

With a wild, nerve-racking sigh. 

The director raised his megaphone, 

A scowl upon his brow : 
"Lizzie, take that leap again! 

You're as awkward as a cow !" 

— Bemadine Hilty. 



The Movie 

Talk about the simple life ! That's what it is. We eat 
and sleep and go to the movies. Sometimes we do a little 
work, but not too much. It is much easier to watch it in 
the pictures, and it comes to the same thing. Somebody 
is working there, and hard, too. 





WE WONDER IF IT IS 
It looks like a wedding ; May Allison as the parson. 



A NATURAL QUERY 
Woman — Two seats, please. 
Ticket seller — Yes'm. But how about the boy? 

The move of the movie is right stimulating. It is so 
full of inspiration that we almost fool ourselves into be- 
lieving we were there. That race, that fight, that game, 
that burglary — why, you have to rub your eyes to wake up; 
and who wants to wake up? 

At last the proper massage has been found for human 
eyes, brains and nerves. The treatment has come to stay, 
and we expect to observe during the next decade a race of 
progressives alive to the greatest possible range of en- 
deavor, from the most natural to the most extraordinary. 
It is to be remarked that some of us are likely to forget 
how the application of this treatment is through the optic 
nerve. The sense of sight is all that is necessary for the 
reception of that which the movie has to offer. Of course 
we know that we really see not with our eyes, but with our 
brain, but that is quite another story. 

We are captured by the spectacle of swift activity, and 
we are almost intoxicated before we know it. This is, 
however, nothing more than normal interest, and it persists 
while time and leisure hold out. When there is just about 
the right admixture of drama, realism, catastrophe and 
love's young dream, who shall say that time and leisure 
count at all? 

It takes no wide excursion of the imagination nor of 
the calm judgment to outline what are possibilities of the 
movie not yet achieved. Some day there will be the proper 
lapse in motility now and then while the story is telling. 
This will mark a refreshing improvement on the swift and 
tumultuous speed of the present. The rather monotonous 
technique of the movie is bound to give way in future to a 
charm hitherto unsuspected. 

Educational 

Go to the movies while ye may; 

There's time enough for sighing. 
See there the newest gown display 

And the latest mode of flying. 




I Why Is Charlie Chaplin? 

By Emma-Lindsay Squier 



I 




F you had an aching tooth 
that you wanted to forget 
about by going to a movie, 
which star would you pick 
as the Ache Distractor? Righto! 
So would we. Both you and I 
would pay our dime plus the war 
tax at the Sign of the Derby Hat 
and the Bamboo Cane, and, once inside, our grouchy molar 
would either laugh itself into temporary good humor or 
die of exhaustion trying to keep our mind on it. 

However, if you happened to be analytical — and the con- 
dition of Friend Molar might induce one to be so — you 
might ask yourself why is Charlie Chaplin, why the mus- 
tache and the bamboo cane, why the derby hat and the 
turned-up-and-out toes? 

Several millions of Chaplin fans can tell you why 
Charlie is the grouch beguiler of the age, but only one 
person can tell you how he came into his world-famous 
equipment for popularity — and that is Charlie himself. 
To get a line on this mystery which has been overlooked 
by both press and press agent, I journeyed out to his studio 
in Hollywood, which is guarded by suspicious gate keepers, 
austere managers and unimaginative publicity persons, 
who are determined to substitute their own views in lieu 
of those of the star — this being a general failing. 

When I finally reached Charlie, who was 
standing by the swimming pool in the middle 
of the inclosed lot, he eyed me at first as if he 
might jump in. He was afraid I was going to 
interview him, and such a procedure is a Chap- 
lin horror. One may talk with him, chat with 
him, joke with him ; but to begin at No. 1 in 
the list of stock questions, such as how he 
likes California and what is 

his favorite flower, is to see I"" 1 "" """""" "" ' ' 

the million-dollar feet dis- | 
appearing in the distance, 
accompanied by a badly 
scared young man. 

So we just talked; and 
when he found I wasn't dan- 
gerous and didn't carry con- 
cealed weapons, such as 
notebooks and pencils, we 
talked even more. He is a 
most attractive young fel- 
low minus the mustache and 
overgrown shoes, and his 
toes do not turn up at the 
edges. He is quiet, even a 
little shy, and occasionally 
displays two rows of perfect 
teeth in a fra.ik and friendly 
smile. One cannot write a 
funny story about him, be- 

CdUSc Oil Lllc oCIl.CH lie lo IIUL iuMimihtiMMmMiMMiMiMNinNiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiNiiiiiiiN 



THE CHAPLIN 




Why is Charlie Chaplin's make-up? 

Did it come about all at once, or was it evolution? 

Does it date back to anfe-movie days? 

Why does he wear the little mustache? Why the 
derby hat? Why the bamboo cane? 

Why does he turn his feet out, rather than in? 

Did he ever see anybody in real life who looks as 
he now looks on the screen? If so, who and where? 

Is he glad that to movie fans, the world over, the 
name Charlie Chaplin at once suggests a little mus- 
tache, a bamboo cane and toes that turn out? 

Will he ever break away, prof essionally , from the 
type which he has created? 



funny. He seems continually 
surprised that he has such a 
vogue, and asks with a depre- 
cating accent, "Did you really 
like the picture?" 

We talked of the famous 
make-up, and when I asked 
him how that particular com- 
bination came about, he looked 
slightly distressed. 

"Really— I— well— I don't 
think I quite know." He hesi- 
tated. "It just appealed to me 
as being sort of funny. You 
know, before I went into pic- 
tures, I was in vaudeville in a 
sketch called 'A Night in an 
English Music Hall,' and I 
played the part of a drunk. I 
had to tumble over myself and 
everything in the scene. So, 
to be as awkward as possible, 
I wore shoes too large for me 
and pants several miles too big. 
The hat and the cane seemed to 
go naturally with the make-up, 
and I've used the 
whole thing with 
very slight vari- 
ations ever since. ' ' 

"But why a little mustache instead of a big 
one?" I wanted to know. The famous Chap- 
lin smile was almost answer enough. 

"Why, one can't show any expression if the 
mouth is hidden by a big 
mustache. Do you think 
so?" 

And gazing on those two 
perfect rows, I most em- 
phatically didn't think so. 

"And why," I pursued, 
shamelessly prying into per- 
sonal matters, "do your feet 
turn out instead of in?" 

"Well, I couldn't walk 
the way I do if my feet 
turned in," he replied, with 
easy logic. "Besides, that 
part of my equipment was 
collected many years ago, 
when I was a boy in London. 
There was an old cabby who 
used to get on regular 
drunks, and when in that 
condition he walked like a 
| pendulum, trying so hard to 
iiiiiiiiiiMmiiiiiiiimiiMiiiimimiiiiifiiimiiiHiiiimiimiiiMiiir maintain nis uignity. inat 




'iiiimiiimiiiiiiiiimini 



. him 



QUESTIONNAIRE 



8 



shuffle fascinated me, and I've spent hours going along 
behind him imitating that stride. He used to skid around 
corners like" 

"Like you do," I interpolated, and Chaplin nodded. 

"Yes, only I've made money by that little trick, and 
he, poor chap, died in the workhouse. A thing like that's 
extraordinary, isn't it?" He gazed pensively into the 
green waters of the pool, and I realized that off the screen 
he is not a comedian, but a philosopher. 

"Then you never saw anyone in real life who looks as 
you do on the screen?" I went on. 

"No, and I never want to," he responded fervently. 
"I may be all right to look at on the screen, but I wouldn't 
want to meet me in private life!" 

A little later I took a peep into the dressing-room where 
the comedy make-up is daily adjusted. It was simply fur- 
nished and well lighted. The sawed-off mustache chummed 
democratically with a stick of fleshing and a bottle of gum 
arabic, and the voluminous trousers hung limply from a 
peg. The best known derby in the world was cocked rak- 
ishly on the back of a chair, and on the floor reposed the 
million-dollar shoes, suggesting, even in their state of un- 
dress, the walk that has made their owner famous. The 
little bamboo cane leaned weakly against the wall, as if 
glad of a breathing spell from hooking policemen's belts 
and millionaires' purses. 

"Do you know," I commenced, getting philosophical 



myself, "that to every film fan in America this array of 
articles means just one thing — Charlie Chaplin?" 

"I suppose so," he responded thoughtfully. "A derby 
hat, a cane, a mustache and turned -up shoes — well, I've 
worked for it hard enough." 

But it seemed to me that he sighed. 

"But surely you're glad of it?" I insisted. "You won't 
break away from the type you've created?" 

"Oh, no, I don't suppose I will — except in pictures 
such as 'Shoulder Arms,' where I wear a tin hat instead of 
a derby and regulation army pants instead of those things. ' ' 
He pointed to the ones on the peg. 

"And if you could begin all over again, would you 
create the same type?" 

He frowned a bit at the innocent mustache on the table. 

"Well, I'm not so sure. Oh, yes, I suppose I would. 
But do you know" — and he almost blushed — "I'd like to 
play something serious just once — something like Hamlet. " 

"Fine idea!" I told him. "Think how much fun you 
could have with 'Alas, poor Yorick's' skull !" 

"Oh, no! I mean I'd like to play it seriously!" he 
assured me. 

And as I left the studio, I wondered if, after all, the 
secret of his success didn't lie in something beyond a 
shuffling walk and a tricky hat — in the fact that he is a 
comedian who is in earnest and takes his work as fans will 
never take it — seriously. 



11 iiiiNi 11 liMiiiniiii 



lliii ::iii]:iimillliliMllllllll]lllllll I 



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Unfit To Print 

There is profanity in the films. Deaf mutes, for whom it was 
supposed moving pictures would provide an ideal amusement, 
read the lips of some moving picture actors and found them 

"vile." — News sensation. 

Little Eva, when you're "dying" 

On the motion picture sheet, 
All the Uncle Tommers crying 
v^u Round your visage, sad and sweet, 

A \ Reassure me, I entreat, 

\f^. That you speak of love, joy, peace, 
\\ls When your earthly sorrows cease 

And the slaves sing "Shall We Meet?" 

Speak up, dear child ! Dispel 
The charge that you say, ' ' ! ' ' 

Marguerita, when your troubles 

With Mephisto overtax, 
And your load of anguish doubles, 

All because of conduct lax; 

When your Faust his luggage packs 
And he goes below to stay, 
Reassure me that you say 

Only words that fit the facts. 

Dear Maggy, tell me true — you 
Do NOT say, " it!" do you? 

She Was a Movie "Fan" 

Harold — You don't believe I love you? 
Susie — No; you don't heave your chest like the lovers 
do in the moving pictures. 




PARAMOUNT-ARBUCKLE 



" THE WATERMELON SMILE" 

Fatty Arbuckle draws no color line in comedy. 



From the Travelogues of Happy Hooligan 




Where are Holmes and Newman com- 
pared with this star of the Educational 
Film Co. ? 



1. " Til tell youse about my trip to 
China. It's a bo!d. ,, 





3. " Tills absoid-looking thing is a Chine 
air-junk, out fishing.'" 




2. " This here is a picture of me and the 
Prime Minister." 



4. '* " Another Chinese uprising,'' says 
the Prime Minister to me." 



c 


■°°6 


■*SS&- : 


s*.» «t^* • 




6. " ' Pve got youse !' This shows me 
administering foist aid." 



5. " I detoimened to show the kidnappers 
of the Prime Minister no moicy." 




7. " ' Happy, youse must come and meet 
the President,' he says to me." 



. " The President of China he knighted 
me Dub of the Poiple Sock-Holder." 



9. " There's another nice decoration for 
youse, Uncle Happy !" 



MilMH uiii .:ii:miiji Jllimillllimilll 



mill iiimiiiiiiiiiinii in 



Alas! 



'Well, 



Said a star of the screen to me: 
kid, 

I've salted my coin away! 
I put it in stocks and bonds, I did, 

And in property that will pay! 
Hereafter, kid, you can touch me NOT, 

For I am a tight-wad gloom ! 
I'll never lend, though I'm worth a 
lot" 

Said I, with a groan: "To whom?" 




■■■ 11 11: ■ 11. '■ n ■ 



1 



10. " And that makes two decorations 
Pve got." 



Recitation 

When winter dies and springtime 
dawns 

And buds swell up and bust, 
Directors feed us winter plays — 

It seems as if they must ! 
And in the fall, when winter's near 

And leaves curl up and croak, 
They slip us lots of summer plots. 

We bite— but where's the joke? 



10 



There is Plenty of Pep in ^Sauce for the Goose' 9 




Kitty and Travers, 
whose specialty is 
^ neglected wives — if 
they are pretty. 



Travers' quick exit to 
his roof in the rain; 
Kitty's husband 

is coming for her. '-V|pP| 



'Gander" husband, forgetful of his 
visits to the widow, is much dis- 
pleased with "goose" wife. 



Recipe of the "Sauce" 

Kitty Constable (Constance Tal- 
madge) is the "goose." By sup- 
ping with Harry Travers in the 
same house where she knows her 
husband is tete-a-tete with Mrs. 
Alloway, a scheming widow, Kitty 
provides most eff ective " sauce. " 
Husband comes in pursuit, on find- 
ing at home Kitty's note, telling 
where she is. The comedy is a 
blend of cross-roof and cross-pur- 
pose, most of the cast being either 
locked in or locked out. Next 
morning Kitty's "bed has not been 
slept in." Scurrying home, she 
had slept in her husband's bed, 
while he was out looking for her. 




He cautions her not to stir, while he 

hunts for her companion. Shocked 

"gander." Naughty "goose." 




Showing the vampish widow, Mrs. Alloway, who tried to lure "gander" from "goose." Kitty is about to 

lock her in the same room with Teddy Sylvester, her faithful though boobish admirer, 

this being but one of the "sauce's" ingredients 



11 




MIX THOROUGHLY, SPRINKLE WELL WITH WORDS, AND SERVE IN A FIVE-REEL 

"HEART-INTEREST" COMEDY 




Their Thanksgiving Prayer 

MARY PICKFORD breathes a pray'r- 
' ' Heaven bless the movies ! ' ' 
Douglas Fairbanks does his share — 

"Heaven bless the movies!" 
Francis Bushman rolls his eyes, 
Theda Bara cries and cries, 
"Fatty's" hit with many pies— 
"Heaven bless the movies!" 



Marguerite, Miss Clark, pipes out — 

"Heaven bless the movies!" 
."^2^ Dustin Farnum gives a shout — 

"Heaven bless the movies!" 
Kitty Gordon smiles and frowns, 
French Max Linder cutely clowns, 
And Valeska wears smart gowns — 

"Heaven bless the movies!" 

Alice Joyce hums the refrain — 

"Heaven bless the movies!" 
Charlie Chaplin twists his cane — 

"Heaven bless the movies!" 
Sidney Drew and wife look sly, 
Mabel Normand winks an eye, 
Kate and I hold hands and sigh — 

"Heaven bless the movies!" 

— Harold Seton. 



Movie Manners 

There has been no little apprehension in certain circles 
lest the youth of the nation become addicted to the man- 
ners exhibited by some of the leaders among moving pic- 
ture actors. It is feared that the ancient and honorable 
moving picture convention of hurling a lemon meringue 
pie into the face of one whose actions are displeasing may 
become general among the younger set. There is a feeling 
that our less mature automobile drivers may attempt to 
emulate moving picture automobilists by tunning their 
machines at a rate varying from 74 to 96 miles per hour, 
for the purpose of revealing the limitations of railroad 
trains. Not a few of our leading citizens have had their 
rest disturbed by the horrible apprehension that their 
daughters may have the poor taste to marry young men 
who wear sport shirts and wave their hair with an electric 
iron. Police commissioners have even shuddered to think 
that their plain-clothes men may fall into moving picture 
habits and shadow suspects by following them at a distance 
of two and one-half feet in broad daylight, as is done in 
the movies. The whole matter, of course, depends on 
whether the rising generations are sufficiently impression- 
able to imitate what they see on the movie screen or 
whether they have common sense. 



12 




A PISCATORY PIPPIN 

Why doesn't some aquarium curator net Annette 
for his finny family ? 



Enlightenment 

By LAWTON MACKALL 



AT LAST I have found out the awful truth about 
humanity. I never even suspected it. Till last 
evening I went along my way cheerfully, blindly, 
never guessing that my fellow-men were steeped in evil. 

But now I know. My eyes have been opened. Foi last 
night I went to one of those enlightening film dramas that 
reveal life as it is. It was called "Her Blackest Sin," and 
it comprised nine reels of terrible truth. 

It was one of those fine moral sermons to which every 
mother ought to take her son, and every niece ought to take 
her uncle, and every stepaunt ought to take her Pekingese. 

I only wish my daughter could have seen it; but as I 
haven't any daughter, she couldn't have. 

This drama shows how a handsome but thoughtless 
woman may sink in sin without ever meaning to. Yes, 
the strange and pitiful part about it is that she really never 
intended to be a fallen, crime-seared creature. She sins 
witlessly: she is scenarioed into it. Perhaps she is too 
anxious to please. She appears at wild cabarets and wears 
gowns that are cut to the quick, not because she desires to 
of her own accord, but because it is expected of her by the 
audience. Lack of firmness leads to her undoing; she is 
first pliant, then supple, then sinuous. She displays too 
little backbone, and too much. 



Poor woman, what chance has she amid so many dres. 
suits? Only too late does she learn that stiff bosoms cover 
none but hard hearts, and that there is no gleam so sinister 
as that of a silk hat. 

Innocent at first, hardly a reel passes before she begins 
to stop and work her face, just the way the villains stop 
and work their faces. (Of course, being still a modest 
woman, she does this only in the privacy of a close-up. ) 
By the seventh reel even her high-minded husband has be- 
come affected with the taint and is stopping and working 
his face. 

And so the drama progresses, growing blacker and more 
enlightening every minute. I can't .be too grateful to the 
producers of this film for the unflinching way in which they 
accepted the responsibility of my innocence and warned 
me. If they had not, I should probably have gone to the 
end of my days without ever knowing that people were at 
bottom only smiling criminals. 

But now, thank goodness, I'm warned and on my guard. 
I'm posted on sin. When a man comes up to me and 
shakes my hand, I'll know he's a hawk looking for a home 
to break up; and when a woman smiles at me, I'll know 
she's a vampire. 

They won't catch me! I'll just watch them surrepti- 



13 

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DRWVN BV JAMES MONTGuMEKY FLAUIt 



THE END OF THE REEL 



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tiously when they are off their guard until I see them 
working their faces, and then I'll have them! 

For now I am an expert on evil. That film showed me 
the thrilling seductions of a life of vice; so that if I am 
ever confronted by them, I shall be able to recognize them 
at once and say how do you do. And at the end there was 



one of those solemn moral warnings, such as everybody 
thinks everybody else is supposed to need; so in future I 
shall know what to avoid in that line. 

And this entire transformation of my life cost me only 
twelve cents. One could hardly get a more thorough edu- 
cation even at a billiard academy. 



14 



Kha^am- The Rubaiyat of a Scotch Highball' - H £ 



Henry 




1. To Jess, accustomed to a country 

town, the dreggy Bohemia was 

sugar and spice. 




By Way of Explanation 

Not much plot, merely a pro- 
gressive state of mind, with 
scene in Greenwich Village, 
New York's bunk Bohemia. 
Bob Babbitt marries a country 
girl, attracted to her because 
they both worship Omar Khay- 
yam. Omar, you recall, cele- 
brated the glories of the grape. 
In New York, Bob and Jess drift 
into a near-art set whose fad 
is drink. Bob pulls himself 
together on hearing it said that 
he "was full as an owl" the 
night before, and comes home 
in no sense a merry villager. 
He tells Jess he is through. 
They quarrel, but a happy train 
of thought wrecks the spell of 
Bohemia and frees them both. 



The bobbed-hair atmosphere in 
which Jess learned to drink 
cocktails. 



And where she met a type of 
"adorable" artist found only 
in bunk Bohemia. 





Jf. Between highballs there was al- 
ways some "unappreciated" 
musical genius to gush over. 



Tne home of Bob and Jess resounded with Bohemian 
laughter at nothing in particular until 
3 a. m. And then — 



6. One sober day, despite Omar Khayyam, Bob de- 
cided to have just straight seltzer in 
his, thereafter. 



15 



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Two Good Reasons patrons," he replied. "And why," we inquired of some 

"Why," we severely demanded of the proprietor of the of the patrons, "do you talk so loudly during the 

moving picture palace, "do you persist in having your pipe show?" 

organ play with such overwhelming and stentorian volumes "In the hope," they answered, "of being able to be 

of sound?" heard by each other over and above the blare and uproar of 

"In an endeavor to drown out the conversation of my the pipe organ." 




EDUCATIONAL 



LIVE AND LEARN 

At the moment of our decision that this was a "close-up" of a vanilla sundae with chocolate sauce, along 

came the Educational Film folks with word that it is an Alaskan glacier topped with moss. 



16 



Showing Up the Hick Town, New York 




Flo's landlady 

serves notice on 

the subject of 

room-rent. 




Opportune 
events bringFlo 
in touch with a 
publicity agent. 



As a "classic dancer" Flo shocks 

the female patrons of a highly 

proper restaurant. 



Story of "Hick Manhattan" 

Flo Donahoe (Peggy Hopkins) is 
down in her luck. New York and 
"success" have not been synony- 
mous. Flo makes the acquaintance 
of Hugh McGinty, publicity man 
(Olin Howland), when a fire in her 
boarding house sends her out upon 
the street in "classic" attire. 
Scenting opportunity, Flo's im- 
promptu publicity man gets her 
into the newspapers via the police 
court, plus a happy-thought press 
yarn about her being a native Greek 
dancer, whose dress and deportment 
have been "simple" since child- 
hood. A vaudeville manager signs 
her up, and New York, or "Hick 
Manhattan," falls gracefully, as 
usual, and gives up its money. 



jii..: ;:.r:- ":"/,. ..: 



Arrested, she puts one over on thi 

police, per instructions of her 

publicity man. 




PARAMOUNT-FLAGQ 



She describes herself as a Greek dancing girl, who 

knew no better. This is Flo in her 

"native fields." 



It is now but a short, quick step to a vaudeville 
contract and emancipation from land- 
Indies. Easy New York! 



17 



A Chase Picture, With Billie Burke in the Lead 




Polly's expression indicates 
the pursuit is getting 
warm. 



that 




Polly vows that 

he who would 

wed her must 

catch her. 



In Pursuit of Polly 

Polly Marsden (Billie Burke) says 
she will marry the suitor who can 
catch her. With her maid's help she 
makes a getaway. A young million- 
aire, on Secret Service work, meets 
Polly when her car breaks down, and 
suspects her of being in league with 
a German spy. The Secret Service 
man, the spy and Polly's suitors, who 
have traced her, provide complica- 
tions in a hotel. The German per- 
suades himself that Polly is playing 
his game, and tells her where "the 
hidden wireless" is. More pursuit. 
Polly is arrested, and it requires 
her father's arrival to clear her. 
Marry? Why, she marries the man 
who caught her, of course — the rich 
young Secret Service man. 



Polly honored by attentions 
German spy, who thinks 
a confederate. 




The Secret Service man, who is young and rich, catches the spy, the pursuing suitors 

and— matrimonially, with her father's consent — 

Polly. 



18 



Movies From Film Fun's Screen 



3"= 



"J3B. 



EDUCATIONAL 
* SERIES * 



01 



w 



CHRIS COLUMBUS 
6ET5 A BRIGHT 
IDEA, BUT 15 
REGARDED A3 

a tour-rusher: 




Lj 

dI lS 


o 3 
•J 


II (L 1 


35. n , PI 




NOT SUCCEEDING 
WITH THE STATESMEN, 
HE TRIES TO MAKE 
A HIT WITH THE 
KING- "0 

& *SAME RESULT 



AS A LAST RESORT 

HE6OE5T0THE 

QUEEN.WHO 

AGREES TO 

HELP 

O HIM (5 






WITH THE QUEENS 
MONEY HE BUY<5 
5HIRS.ANDJWR1S 
ON THE FAMOUS 
VOYAGE 



AfTER A ROUGH 
TOP, AMERICA 
I5DI5COVERLD 



BACK HOME AGAIN 
HE SETS A ROYAL 
WELCOME BY ALL 
-EXCEPT THE QUEEN 
WHO HAS A LITTLE 
SURPRISE FOR HIM 





THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA : SHOWING THAT IT WAS NO CINCH FOR COLUMBUS 



19 







Song of the " Extra " 

By Charlotte Mish 

I WANT to be a movie star — 
I do ! I do ! I do ! 
I want to own a motor car — 

How true ! How true ! How true ! 
Just look, just look, just LOOK at me! 

For looks I am a winner! 
I've got THE personality ! 

I could play saint or sinner ! 
I resemble Soandso — 

Almost am a double ! 
I can make my features go 

Without a bit of trouble ! 
I could look mad as well as glad — 

I could ! I could ! I could ! 
I'd be the best they ever had ! 

I would ! I would ! I would ! 
How dumb these old directors are ! 

It really makes me BLUE ! 
I want to be a movie star — 

I do ! I do ! I DO ! 



Action 

He had never seen her before, but he fell in love with 
her as she stepped from the surface car. "Come," he 
said, grabbing her by the arm. "We will take a taxi to 
the nearest clergyman and be married. ' ' 

While waiting for the minister to put on a clean collar, 
wash his hands and otherwise prepare for the ceremony, 
the young man telephoned to the nearest furniture store. 
"Hello! Is this the general manager? Well, I want you 
to furnish a three-room apartment for me. There is one 
advertised in this morning's Planet, No. 42 West One Hun- 
dred and 'Steenth Street. Yes, it is not very far from 
you. Have the furniture there in ten minutes, please." 

Eleven minutes later a taxi raced through One Hundred 
and 'Steenth Street, and the bride and groom entered their 
new home. 

"Doesn't this seem — er — a little bit sudden to you?" 
asked the bride, as she sat down to get her breath. 

"N-no, not exactly," replied the groom. "In fact, it 
seems the most natural thing in the world. You see, for 
the past five years I've done nothing but write moving 
picture scenarios. ' ' — c. H. F 

You Betcher ! 

Sis — Two hours and a quarter doesn't mean very much 
to me. 

Bobby — Well, I could take in a high-class movie show 
if I had two hours and a "quarter." 




-TioHffl- 

A PROPHETIC MOTION PICTURE 

Patriotic Americans who wish to see the down- 
fall of autocracy will give this picture 
a circular twisting motion 
toward the left. 



20 



The Cause of the War 

CLARENCE, my ex-roommate, and I have separated. 
Listen ! Now, YOU know there is only one regular 
guy on the screen. That's Willis Art! Everybody admits 
THAT! 

But Clarence couldn't see him if his face was all eyes. 
Clarence had a broad chest and a narrow mind. I'd come 
home from the show and tell him how Willis Art canned 
the crooks from the camp, shot up the bad guy and mar- 
ried the giil. 

Yes, and I had a lasso, and I used to rope Clarence with 
it and drag him around the room sometimes. You know 
— just showing him how Willis Art did it. No good guy 
ought to get mad at that ! But Clarence did. He said if I 
didn't lay off him with that Wild West stuff, he'd blow the 
shack — as we used to say on the campus. 

After that Clarence was a bum audience for me. He'd 





PARAMOUNT 



CHARLES BAY IN " STRING BEANS" 

Some men are born hicks; others have hick roles thrust 
upon them by a director. 



BETWEEN THE ACTS 

Moving picture: " A Narroio Escape." in three desperate 
reels. Released by the Mammouth Corporation. 



go asleep and snore right when I'm a-telling how Willis 
Art rode horseback into the dance hall and dragged out the 
tough guys on the end of his rope. Right through the glass 
window and everything! You know, a bird that could take 
a nap on that line of stuff ain't normal. He's darned near 
stupid ! 

One night there wasn't a Willis Art picture in town. 
So I stayed in. And so Clarence went out. Shows what 
a mean cuss he was! Just as I was all fixed for a pleasant 
evening telling him about Willis Art — he ducks!* 

In a couple of hours he's back, noisy as a six-year-old 
Ford and wearing a grin that looked like a sickle ! And I 
never even ever saw him SMILE before ! Honest, it scared 
me! 

He shied off his hat and coat, leapfrogged over the table, 
vaulted over the back of the Morris and sat down in front 
of me, the grin working all the time. Also, he gave me a 
wallop on the leg that darned near scorched my pants ! 

"Harold," says he, without losing the grin, "I've just 
seen the greatest man in the world !" 

"How did YOU get into the White House?" I comes 
back, giving him one of those Willis Art piercing glances. 

"Nix!" replies Clarence. "I'd rather be Fairless than 
President any time!" 

"You'll be airless in a minute," I pipes, "because I'll 
choke off your wind if you don't wipe that grin off and 
give me the works; and if you spank my leg like that 
again, I'll bust you one! Where'd you get the bun?" 

"You know I don't drink," says Clarence. "At that, 
it's funny I don't, after listening to all that desert stuff of 
Art's you keep feeding me!" 

I got up. "Wow!" yelps Clarence, as he trips me up 
and swings himself up on the chandelier. I was looking 
around for my lasso to tie him up, when he takes a Keller- 
mann off the chandelier and flattens me out on the rug. 

"Whoopee!" he yells, sitting up on my back. "THAT'S 
how he does it!" 

"All right!" I gasps. "I'll be the goat. Who does 
what?" 

"Fairless Dougbanks!" pipes Clarence. "I saw him 
to-night in the pictures. Say, that bird's a wonder ! He 
licks seventeen guys and jumps over a" 

I roll him over and get up. Then we mix. After they 
pried us apart, we decided to live that way. , 

Say, I'll bet lots of these divorces are caused just thai 
way ! Suppose a guy's wife can't appreciate Willis Art? 
What's he going to do? Huh? -Harry J. Smalley. 



21 



No; It Is Not William J, Bryan, It Is Fred Stone 




1. Chuck's mother is sure that her iron- 
worker son was cut out for 
the movies. 



2. Chuck dresses to look the part of 

the lady who does not 

skate- 




3. The leading 
key as 



lady's eyes make a mon 
well as a goat of 
Chuck. 



Tale of "The Goat" 

Chuck McCarthy (Fred Stone) 
is an iron-worker who breaks 
into the movies as an "extra." 
He himself is ' ' the goat. ' ' He 
subs for the star as a roller 
skater, and falls out with his 
sweetheart, Molly O' Connor, 
when fascinated by the smiles 
of the actress. The leading man 
balks at a risky stunt, and Mc- 
Carthy doubles for him. As the 
hero is supposed to be bandaged 
about the face, no one is wiser 
for the shift. McCarthy makes 
a rescue not in the scenario, is 
hurt, and the leading man gets 
the credit. Cured of screenitis, 
McCarthy asks Molly if she will 
take back her iron-worker. 




4.. Chuck decides that clothes, 
chance, will make a man a leacli 



given a 
ng wan. 




5. The substitution: The leading man stays in his dress- 
ing room; "the goat." assumes the risk consider- 
ately provided by the scenario writer. 



6. After the real thing in rescues. Proof that Chuck's 

sweetheart, Molly, has forgiven her wandering 

" goat" for falling for the smiles of a movie queen. 



22 



Supeing for Tourneur 



By Harold Seton 



PARAMOUNT 



So to Mr. Tour- 



WHEN Maurice Tourneur pro- 
duced "The Bluebird," a 
new standard was estab- 
lished in the moving pic- 
ture world — a standard of 
ideas and ideals. With tens of 
thousands, perhaps hundreds of 
thousands, of cinema enthusi- 
asts in all parts of the world, I 
had marveled at the artistry of 
the performance. So now I 
went to the Solax Studio, out 
at Fort Lee, N. J., and talked 
with the casting director. I 
told him of my experiences and 
adventures as an "extra" in the 
neighboring studios, and asked 
for a day's work with Mr. Tourneur, 
neur's office I was conducted. 

He received me courteously, charmingly, and seeing 
that I was sincerely interested in his achievements, he 
showed me how he prepared his productions, turning over 
the pages of great scrapbooks filled with prints and photo- 
graphs of cities and houses and people and costumes. He 
was now directing a scene depicting Adam and Eve in the 
Garden of Eden, and had collected many studies by the 
famous Dore, illustrator of the Bible and of Dante's In- 
ferno. Here were angels and devils and fantastic land- 
scapes. 

"We are doing the Garden of Eden episode to'day," 
said Mr. Tourneur. ' ' Come and see our first parents. ' ' 

So I came, I saw — 
and Mr. Tourneur con- 
quered ! The scene, in- 
side the studio, was one 
of great beauty. Against 
a skyblue .background 
stood the Tree of Knowl- 
edge, and from its 
branches hung the fatal 
apples. The rehearsals 
began, and deposed be- 
fore the camera. The 
interpreter of the role 
was young and lovely, 
her costume consisting 
of a golden wig, with 
ringlets reaching to the 
knees. I thought of the 
old saying, "Beauty un- 
adorned is adorned the 
mosH" Adam appeared, 
cleverly made up as half 
man and half ape, with 
hairy legs and chest. 
Eve pointed to the apple 





The custard-pie atmosphere is agreeably lacking in the 
Tourneur type of picture. 



wonder ingly, expectantly. Then an 
Angel with a flaming sword came in, 
and the Devi' peeped around the tree, 
with great, batlike wings outstretched. 
"The picture is in several 
episodes, showing the influ- 
ence of woman," said Mr. 
Tourneur. "We can use you 
in the next scene — the Roman 
episode. Report next Wednes- 
day at eight o'clock in the 
morning." 

When next Wednesday ar- 
rived, I arrived with it. But 
I disregarded Mr. Tourneur's 
========== ^^^ = ^^ = directions and reached the 

studio at seven - thirty. I 
wanted to see all that was to be seen, more than I was 
supposed to see. Finding no one around the studio, I 
made my way over to the vacant lot, where a Roman 
street had been set up, with dwellings and shops and a tem- 
ple. It reminded me of Pompeii, where I had returned 
day after day in spellbound ecstasy. Every detail of the 
construction was complete and perfect, from the great, flat 
stones in the roadway to the frescoes on the walls and the 
signs and scribblings in Latin. 

In one booth were fruits, in another were vegetables. 
Then there was a shop filled with brass bowls of all shapes 
and sizes. Here were live chickens, and next door was 
the baker's establishment, with real loaves of proper form 
displayed. Suddenly, coming from fancies of the past to 

facts of the present, .1 
realized that the time 
was eight o'clock, so 
hurried back to the 
studio and found that the 
mob was assembling. 

Men, women and 
children came pushing 
in through the doors, 
peering in through the 
windows. Before long 
the three hundred who 
had been engaged were 
gathered together, all 
talking and gesticulating 
excitedly. Italian fami- 
lies had come from miles 
around, often three gen- 
erations being repre- 
sented, wrinkled grand- 
mothers dragging squal- 
1 i n g grandchildren. 
There were also Span- 
iards and Greeks, as I 
found from listening to 



23 



and talking with my fellow "extras." 
There were Frenchmen, too, and 
Turks. In fact, all the dark-skinned, 
dark-eyed races were represented. 
None were more picturesque than 
the giant negroes who were to im- 
personate slaves. 

One part of the mob was huddled 
in this corner, and another in that, 
and I was told that my dressing-room 
was "up there, near the roof." In 
the compartment there was really 
space for ten or twelve persons, but 
some twenty-five or thirty were 
crowded in. However, this circum- 
stance was in itself a new experience, 
so afforded a new sensation. 

Two old Irishmen were making up 
as Roman senators, the man who 
threw my clothes off a peg was an 
Italian, and the man who tried to grab 
my sandals was a Greek. I enjoyed 
the local color, but not the local 
odor, so hurried out of the dressing- 
room in my little tunic and my slip- 
ping slippers, somewhat embarrassed 
and quite excited. Below, on the 
studio floor, pandemonium had been 
let loose. Men and women in half- 
modern and half- ancient costumes 
were rushing around, directing and 
misdirecting one another, brandish- 
ing trousers or corsets; children were 
getting lost and found. I talked to a 
Roman matron wearing a service-star 
brooch, and to an Ethiopian slave 
smoking a briar pipe. 

Then came the word to go out to 
the lot, to get into the scene; so we 
all straggled off and were assigned to 
our places, this group to the right 
and that group to the left, these peo- 
ple to be shopping at the booths, 
those people to be leaning from the 
balconies. I saw an old man reading 
a Hebrew newspaper, and spied a 
small child sneaking apples from a 
basket. 

Then Mr. Tourneur mounted the 
steps of the temple and through a 
megaphone directed the rehearsals. 
We started at nine, but it was twelve 
before the camera man began to crank 
his machine. We were forbidden to 
look in his direction; instead, we 
were intent upon the crowd of ur- 
chins who came running and tumbling HAVE YOU AN EYE FOR AN EYE? 
along the highway in advance of the Then identify these. They are "regis- 
mounted troops, who were followed tering love" for Harold Lockwood, 
by dancing girls with flowers to strew Warren Kerrigan, William Rus- 

• a.\. o , , , . sell, Charles Ray and Irving 

in the path of the approaching— em- Cummings, respectively. 



i!4&0&%* 



peror! His imperial majesty was 
borne in a gorgeous litter, supported 
by six black slaves. 

Mr. Tourneur said : "Shout! 
Gesticulate!" So we did so. We 
yelled: "Hooray!" "Viva Italia!" 
and even "To hell with the Kaiser!" 
We jumped up and down, we jostled 
one another, we struggled for the best 
. places. This performance was gone 
over and over until one o'clock. 
Then came a time to rest — and to eat. 
Refreshments were provided, but after 
one glance in the direction of the 
mob, three hundred strong, scram- 
bling for food, I decided that, al- 
though I had been engaged as an "ex- 
tra" and had dressed with and yelled 
with the "extras," I really preferred 
to dine with the "regular actors," so 
sought out a charming and cultured 
girl I had met at other studios and 
lunched with her — in the imperial 
litter. She was playing the part of a 
princess. After a time the emperor 
himself joined us, and we talked of 
literature and art and cabbages and 
kings. 

For a while the strange sights and 
stranger smells were forgotten, but 
then came more rehearsals and more 
photography, until at last, at a quar- 
ter to six, we were dismissed, to the 
wild delight of the rabble, who were 
impatient to get back to their wash- 
tubs and news-stands, their shoe 
shines and their street corners. 

Not all of the extra people are of 
the hoi polloi, however. Later on I 
was to learn this when three hundred 
extras, in gorgeous raiment, appeared 
as an opera audience. 

We tore out of our togas and into 
our trousers, then formed in double 
lines to get our slips, which were 
turned into cash at the office window. 
Some got two-fifty, some got three- 
fifty, and some got five. Those who 
got five had done little "bits." For 
my part, I must admit I felt almost 
ashamed to take Mr. Tourneur's 
money. I felt I was obtaining it un- 
der false pretenses. For he had af- 
forded me a day's entertainment, had 
provided a veritable treat, and, in- 
stead of my paying him, he was pay- 
ing me ! I have had many amusing 
experiences in my life, many divert- 
ing adventures in the movies, but I 
shall never forget the paradoxical per- 
formance of — supeing for Tourneur! 



24 





Lest the Audience Forget 

NEVER make the mistake of thinking it is too late 
to drop around to the movies. It never is. 
Remember that between the time when the "big 
picture" is first flashed upon the screen and the 
instant when the initial action -picture is shown, the film 
company must inform the audience in fullest detail of the 
following: 

FLICKER FLICKER FILM CO., INC. 

HENRY B. FLICKER, Pres. 

MARTIN S. FLICKER, Secretary. 

MOE RILEY, Treas. 

Studios, Los Angeles, Cat 



Real and Reel. 

An Obvious Deduction 

The stickler — Why do they call them moving picture 
studios? A studio is the workshop of a person who 
paints. 

The movie actress — You apparently have never visited a 
moving picture studio. 



The Stupendous Five-reel Thriller 
THE MYSTERIOUS MUFFIN. 

From the book of that name by Egbert Hamm Saltina. 
( Copyright, E. H. Saltina. ) 

Dramatic and Motion Picture Rights the Property of 

The Flicker Flicker Film Co., Inc. 

HENRY B. FLICKER, Pres. 



THE MYSTERIOUS MUFFIN. 

Book by Egbert Hamm Saltina. 

Scenario by Morris Scrapbook and Lester Lunger. 

Staged under the Direction of 

Wilfred Sombrero. 

(The Flicker Flicker Film Co., Inc., Los Angeles.) 




HYSTERIA STUTZ. 
HAROLD HAIRWAVY. 

Co-stars in the Flicker Flicker Film Co.'s (Inc.) Great 

Production of Saltina's 

THE MYSTERIOUS MUFFIN. 

(Copyright, E. H. Saltina.) 

Dramatic and Motion Picture Rights the Property of 

The Flicker Flicker Film Co. , Inc. 

HENRY B. FLICKER, Pres. 

MARTIN S. FLICKER, Secretary. 

MOE RILEY, Treas. 



ARE YOU FOLLOWING 
The Mysterious Muffin 

Every Week in 

The Magazine Section of the Sunday Nap? 

(Nap Publishing Co., Inc. ) 

READ IT IN THE NAP. SEE IT ON THE SCREEN. 



Just as the Train is about to run over the Heroine. 



Flicker Films for Finicky Folks. 

( Trade-mark Copyrighted. ) 

Trade-mark Registered in the Library of Congress, the 

Hague Peace Palace and the Chicago Stockyards. 

Henry B. Flicker. Pres. 



25 




Here we have a lesson in geology. These young movie 
ladies, Louise Glaum and Company, are on vacation, not 
"location," in Del Mar, Cal. The rock on which they sit 
has been "on location" at Del Mar for a number of thou- 
sand or million centuries — the difference in detail being 
immaterial in geology. When this earth was a whirling 
ball of fire, there wasn't any rock at Del Mar or anywhere 



else. But gradually a crust formed over the spinning 
flame and the surface cooled off, making first a sort of 
fudge and then rocks, this one and others. Through the 
glacial period this rock was very cool indeed, and since 
then has been positively cold and unemotional. At the 
time our photograph was taken, however, it began to warm 
up — a perfectly natural thing for it to do, geologists claim. 



m iiiiiJimiMiiiimimiiuiiimiMMiTiiiiitiiimiiiMiiimiimiimiimiiiimiii 



iiiiimiiiiiiimiimiiii 



lll![[]llll[IIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIII..|J]l|[IIMII 



WILFRED SOMBRERO SAYS: 

"I consider THE MYSTERIOUS MUFFIN my greatest 

triumph in motion picture production." 

( Copyright, Wilfred Sombrero, Inc. ) 



"FLICKER HEROES KEEP THE HEART FIRES 
BURNING." 

(Trademark Copyrighted, Manicured, Sponged and 

Pressed. Entered in the Library of Congress, 

the Spare Room and the Attic. ^ 



PORTRAIT OF WILFRED SOMBRERO, 

Director, Flicker Flicker Film Co., Inc. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



"FLICKER FLICKER STARS ARE WORLD-FAMOUS." 

(Trade-mark Copyrighted, 1918. Entered in the Library 

of Congress, the Cave of the Winds, Niagara, 

and Mammoth Cave, Kentucky. ) 



PORTRAIT OF HAROLD HAIRWAVY 

In his virile interpretation of Lemuel Lariat in 

"The Mysterious Muffin." 

(Copyright by Harold Hairwavy, Inc.) 

(Photo by Flicker Flicker Feature Service, 

H. B. Flicker, Pres.) 

'IF YOU HAVEN'T SEEN A FLICKER, YOU HAVEN'T 
SEEN A FILM." 



PORTRAIT OF HYSTERIA STUTZ 

In her Matchless portrayal of Bessie Bean in 

"The Mysterious Muffin." 

(Copyright by Hysteria Stutz,. Inc.) 

(Photo by Flicker Flicker Feature Service, 

H. B. Flicker, Pres.) 



Then, after a few additional copyrights, "incs" and 
entrances into the Library of Congress, they at last let 'er 
flicker, and you may see what you came to see. But never 
make the error of thinking that you must bolt your dinner 
or leave the dishes unwashed, in order to "get there in 
time." —a. h. F. 



26 




ONE- REEL FEATURE—' "THE VILLAGE SCANDAL" 



Markowitz and Henry Discuss the Movies 



By LOU RAB 



"W 



"HERE'S everybody? Where's Minnie? 

Where's the kids?" inquired Henry Shapiro 

upon entering the home of Max Markowitz, 

his boss and brother-in-law, and finding the 

skirt manufacturer half asleep on a couch in the pinocle 

library. 

"Where's Minnie? Where's the kids?" repeated Mark- 
owitz mockingly, as he assumed a sitting posture and 
rubbed his eyes sleepily. "Henry, like I told you already 
more than a thousand times, you can ask more foolish 
questions in one minute than what the whole Supreme 
Court from the United States can answer in a season. 
Why don't you ask that old 
question, what even a baby 
with a bottle knows — 
'Where was Moses when 
the lights went out?' — and 
I'll give you the same an- 
swer, with an improvement 
— 'In the dark, by the mov- 
ies.' I myself didn't care 
to go, because we auctioned 
last night till three o'clock, 
and I feel so sleepy this 
afternoon like an actor in 
the morning. So I let Min- 
nie and Lester and Florence 
go by themselves." 

"And I tell you, Hen- 
ry," continued Markowitz, 
after pausing to light one of 
his favorite Habanoras, "the 
movies ain't no more a 
special number, a luxury 
like champanier or finger 
bowls ; they have become so 
necessary for life like bread 
and water and skoits" 




Dorothy — Does she want a new hat too, Mamma? 



"And pinocle," added Henry, smiling. 
"You laugh!" exclaimed Markowitz earnestly. "I'd 
like to see my kids let me live a minute if I didn't give 
them money for the movies. The big kids, too, want them 
woister than the little fellers. And for why not? It's 
good for them. Look! Before the movies commenced, 
married couples after supper used to pick up a paper for a 
while, then pick up a little schmuess, a talk about high- 
priced hats or low-life bosses, and by the end they would 
pick up an argument what would finish oder in broken 
crockery or in broken language, depending upon their na- 
tionality. What better could they do in the long nights? 

But since the picktches com- 
menced, couples are moving 
to the movies, prompt like 
they got a dispossess notice, 
right after finishing the 
dishes. Yes, the movies 
made a regela revolution in 
the life from people. Chil- 
dren what used to know 
notting but loaf and play, 

day and night, now" 

"Sure!" broke in Henry 
sarcastically. "Children 
what used to know notting 
but healthy play now know 
notting but photoplay. And 
kids now know more about 
what they oughtn't to know 
than what grandfathers 
wanted to know — from 
vampires to war brides. The 
best time from a boy's or 
a goil's life, what should 
be spent in the big outside 
with nature — running and 
jumping and catching — 



27 






they spend inside with picktches what shows life ten times woiser than 
what it really is. Married men with affinities, affinities with otomobiles, 
otomobiles with joy riders, and joy rides with married men." 

"Henry," maintained Markowitz, "you're speeching like a regela 
preacher. Just like that young Mr. Greenfield, what I met in the winter 
country, and who's a good pinocle player in private, and a grand speecher 
against it when there's more than four hands. But you make an elephant 
from a peanut. All the picktches aren't like what you say — vampires and 
war brides. Take Charlie Chaplin for a sample. When I see him, I not 
only laugh myself, but I enjoy myself extra when I hear the way all the 
kids are laughing music in my ears. I tell you, boys wouldn't have one 

per cent, the fun playing tag like they have from Charlie Chaplin and" 

"Charlie Chaplin!" interrupted Henry satirically. "Since he walked 
into the movies, every boy in America stopped walking straight. Their 
ambitions to become bank presidents or college presidents or Washington 
presidents are out of style now like long skoits with big sleeves. All a 
young feller wants now is to duplicate Charlie and throw custard pies at 
stuck-up men with stove-pipes and pull chairs out of puffed-up ladies with 
diamonds. I ain't seen a boy yet what goes to school what can't repeat 
Chaplin's tricks better than the multiplication table and what don't know 
by heart the history of every movie queen, from the date of her last divorce 
to the age of her foist husband. Max, just for fun you ask your Lester 
when he comes back from the movies to tell you all he knows about 
that great young lady from history — Joan of Arc — and 
about that pretty young lady from the picktches — Mary 
Pickford. About the foist one, I bet you he'll be so quiet 
like Yom Kippur on Broadway; but when it will come to 
talk about Mary, he'll speak like a shipping cloik sent out 
on the road for a trial. Fine things they're loining from 
the movies!" 

"And for mine part," argued Markowitz, "I would bet- 
ter get a smile from that sweet queen of the movies, what 
puts light into many dark hearts right now, than to loin all 
about leading ladies from a thousand years back. Henry, 
you can stand here and talk from now to the fall season, 
and you couldn't change me an inch from a movies booster 
to a picktche knocker. Look what them fillem theayters 
done for everybody, from the smallest countries to the big- 
gest cities ! They take a man what never went f arer than 
Coney Island and travel him all over the Philippine Islands 
in a parle car seat, all for a nickel ; and a farmer what's 
been dying to see life in New York sees Forty-second Street 
and Broadway for only a dime. As for the high life of 
them picktche actorkes, I tell you most of them lead a better 
life in private than what Sunday-school superintendents 
lead in public. And" — Here Markowitz stopped, for he 
heard his wife and children returning from the movies. 

"Now I'll show you who's right!" whispered Henry to 
his brother-in-law in a tone of anticipated triumph. "I'll 
prove you that what I said before is so true like to-day is 
Sunday. I bet Lester and Florence don't know a button 
about that great young goil from historia what was a reg- 
ela general and yet knows all about Mary" 

"Uncle Henry, Uncle Henry !" cried Lester, the younger 
of the two Markowitz children, suddenly jumping into the 
pinocle library, "we saw a peach of a picture in the 
movies ! ' ' 

"Charlie Chaplin, of course, " grunted Henry, in disgust. 

"No, uncle, it was Joan of Arc!" denied Lester, fol- 
lowed by a continuous chuckle from his father and abso- 
lute silence from his uncle. 




A MOVING PICTURE GIRL 

Lovelorn 

r-p<HE boy and girl sat close together. He spoke at last: 
■*■ "I — I've got something I must say — but, well, you 
know I'm not very strong on the poetic stuff, lliorma. 
I'd like to say this in classy language, you know, regular 
book language, like some fellows could; but — it doesn't 
seem to come easy, somehow. It's all in my heart, good 
and strong, this worship of mine, but I can't seem to ex- 
press it the way I want to. Oh, Thorma dear, you know 
what I want!" 

For a moment there was silence. The girl bit her lip 
and allowed a tiny frown of annoyance to wrinkle her brow. 

' ' Yes, I know what you want, ' ' she said, " and I consent. ' ' 

At the boy's cry of joy she put out her hand. 

"Yes, I consent," she said, "but this will positively be 
the last love letter I'll write to Mary Pickford for you, my 
dear brother. Positively!" c. a 



28 




A MOVING PITCHER 







avethe 

Thoughtless 




WS.S. 



WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 

ISSUED BY THE 

UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT 



ars 



"I got the sweetest hat today. And, my dear, of course, 
I didn't really need it, but — " 



* * 



"What if it is only a few blocks? Here, taxi!" 
* * * * 

"/ know I'd feel a lot better if I ate less, but I simply 
must have a big order of — " 



Over there in the Picardy mud, pock-marked with 
significant craters and "plum-caked" with unspeakable 
things that once were men, our soldiers can't hear all 
that some of us are saying. Good that they can't, isn't 
it? It wouldn't make it any easier to stand firm against 
those blood-crazed, grey hordes who come on wave 
after wave because they believe their Kaiser is "God's 
anointed shepherd of the German people." 



It isn't that we Americans are a selfish people. vVe 
have simply been thoughtless. 

Money is needed to win this war — let's give it. So far, 
we have been asked only to lend — to lend at a good round 
4% interest. Turn your THOUGHTLESS dollars into 
War Savings Stamps. 

NATIONAL WAR SAVINGS COMMITTEE, 
WASHINGTON 




Contributed through Division of Adoertising United Slates Goo' I, Comm. on Public Information 

This space contributed for the Winning of the Wat hi 

PUBLISHERS OF FILM FUN 



30 



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A FRIGID RECEPTION 
Percy Spenderbilt brings home a wife from the ranks of the Vampires. 



In Our Town 

Vergil Thomson believes in the in- 
ternal fitness of things. When a rain- 
storm showed on the screen the other 
night, he played "Little Drops of 
Water." 

•f- 

Hen Reardon says that the talk about 

the interest in moving pictures dyin' 
out is all bosh. He's been twice in the 
past week an' is thinkin" of goin' again 
Monday. 

«■*• 

We mourn our loss. Ray Batchellor 

has left our town an' moved to an 
aristocratic neighborhood, where they 
charge ten cents for a nickel show an' 
get away with it. 

-?- 

Bee Hume went to the Empire Mo- 
tion Picture Theayter last night an' 
found a lady's handkerchief. Now 
he's afraid he'll be arrested for carryin' 
away Annette Kellermann's wardrobe. 
«■?- 

We're havin' a reg'lar epidemic. 

Doctor Cross advised that little Johnnie 

Craig be taken to moving pictures 

while he was convalexing from the 

meesles, an' now every blamed kid in 

our town is sick. 

-?- 
Deacon Gubsing is mortally scared 

someone will carry him off for his 




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money, like they did Romain Fielding, 
in "The Mexican." Melvin Withers 
says he is afraid there ain't anyone in 
our town with enough public spirit to 
do that. 

-J- 

It pays to believe in signs. Pa See- 
mans sold the potato he's carried in his 
pocket for the last twenty years, to drive 
away rheumatism, for enough to buy a 
house an' lot, two eggs, three ounces 
of coal, an' still has enough left to take 
him to the picture show for the next 
ten years. 

-9- 

We're havin' so many improvements 
in our town that we're gettin' quite 
metropolluting. Adams has moved into 
a new drug store, the railroad has put 
new boards in their crossing, George 
Bryant has two new stools in his res- 
torant, an' the moving picture theay- 
ter has a new window in its ticket office, 
an' yet we ain't stuck up a mite. 

Can You Imagine? 

Flora Finch as Juliet ? 

Sidney Drew as Romeo ? 

Stuart Holmes as Falstaff? 

Fay Tincher as Evangeline ? 

Roscoe Arbuckle as Penrod ? 

Douglas Fairbanks as Hamlet? 

Marguerite Clark as Cleopatra ? 

Jane Lee as Little Lord Fauntleroy ? 

Francis X. Bushman as Tom Saw- 
yer? 

Mary Pickford as the Witch of 
Endor? 

Any photoplay without the in- 
evitable clasp-me, hug-me, kiss-me 
finis? 






31 




Olive Tell, now engaged in making her 

first Metro picture, ' ' Secret Strings. ' ' 

Binkey ' ' her pet Pomeranian takes 

a vivid interest in her appearance — 

and his own. 

Who's Who and Where 

Helen Keller has leased space in Par- 
alta studios at Hollywood and is at work 
on a series of pictures which will be, 
in effect, an autobiography of this won- 
derful blind woman's life. Romance 
pales before the facts of her accom- 
plishment. Miss Macy appears with 
her in the pictures. 

-?- 

The Division of Films of the Com- 
mittee on Public Information will move 
on October 1st to new quarters in the 
building at 6 West Forty-eighth Street. 
The new location affords more com- 
modious quarters for all departments 
than those now occupied in the Times 
Building. 

The Division will have the fourth, 
sixth and seventh floors. The First 
National and Paralta are already dom- 
iciled in this building. 

-5- 
The Motion Picture War Service As- 
sociation reports that several thousand 
dollars were realized from the masked 
ball at the Los Angeles Shrine Audito- 
rium. Photoplayers are warm-hearted, 
generous, fun-loving and spendthrift, 
bless their hearts ! and the building of 
a five-hundred -room hospital for the 
care of comrades, to be ready when the 
need arises and our own boys come 
back ill or wounded, appealed to them 
so that the dollars. poured into the cof- 
fers of the committee. 



W. S. Hart has discovered that a pic- 
ture star's life is almost anything but 
a primrose path. In making "Shark 
Monroe" he went with his company up 
into the high Sierras, where the snow 
is deep, and from there out on the Pa- 
cific, where the water is deeper. A 
squall nearly wrecked their small craft, 
and Hart was sorry it didn't, for he 
found out he is not a good sailor. 
However, he overcame his anguish be- 
fore the scenes were shot, so that all is 
well with the picture, but Hart vows 
that "never again" will he consent to 
ride a bucking ocean. 
-?- 

An exposition of the motion picture 
interests will be held in Madison Square 
Garden, October 5th to 13th. The mov- 
ing motive for such a gathering is the 
purpose of this great industry to ren- 
der itself 100 per cent, effective in 
win-the-war undertakings. 

Demonstration of all the latest de- 
vices in projection will be offered for 
the consideration of exhibitors, and for 
the general public there will be a min- 
iature motion picture studio, in which 
pictures will be made in order that vis- 
itors may learn, if they will, a few of 
the mysteries of the photoplay. 

Many stars from West Coast studios 

will probably be in attendance what 

time they can spare from their work 

for the Liberty Loan. 
-?- 
Educational Films Corporation of 




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Naomi Childers, supporting Ethel Barry- 
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27 Years the Enemy of Pain 




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MORE PERILOUS 
Friend— Any innovations in your Uncle Tom's Cabin film,? 

Producer — Oh, yes ! Instead of having Eliza escape by crossing the river on the float- 
ing ice cakes, toe have her escape by crossing Broadway at Forty-second Street. 



America has contracted with E. M. 
Newman for the release of thirty travel 
subjects during the next twelve months. 
The pictures will be booked in first- 
class moving picture theaters in the 
United States, Canada, Mexico, South 
America and all of the European coun- 
tries, for Newman has visited every 
habitable part of the globe during his 
ten years of travel, and his pictures are 
rare and unusual. 

This new departure will in no way 
interfere with Mr. Newman's regular 
annual series of Traveltalks. He will 
travel five months each year in search 
of new impressions and up-to-date 
scenes for his many ' ' fellow-travelers, ' ' 
most of whom must do their adventur- 
ing by way of the silver sheet. 

-5- 

A new service flag with eleven stars 
was recently hoisted to the peak over 




the Rolin studios in Los Angeles. 
Players and studio workers who have 
gone to the colors are Herbert Brodie, 
Naval Reserve; "Slim" Voorhies, Coast 
Artillery; J. B. Roach, with the 47th 
Regiment, now "over there"; Walter 
L. Adams, acrobatic actor, Aviation 
Corps; "Sandy" Roth, U. S. N. ; Clyde 
Hopkins, now in France with the Signal 
Corps ; Lige Cromley, government 
school for gasoline engines; Ray Kel- 
lerman, now in France with Engineer 
Corps ; Charles Stevenson, Camp 
Kearney; Joe Matice, U. S. Aviation 
timber cruiser; Max D. Hamberger, 
cook at the Presidio. 

The Child in Back of You 

(Continued from page 5) 
the big rats eat her up? Could rats 
really swim like that, mamma? Could 
they?" 

(Reply incoherent.) 

"But I don't understand. Why didn't 
the man with the earrings kill her, 
mamma? Wasn't his knife sharp 
enough? Mamma! I say, wasn't 
his knife sharp enough?" 

(Reply apparently unbelievable.) 

"But does she always escape, 
mamma? Aren't they ever going to 
kill her?" 

(Reply discouraging. ) 

"Why not, mamma?" 

Editorial Note. — There are two endings to 
this. Early movies, it ends around nine o'clock. 
Late movies, about eleven. 




Out of the Mouth of Hell 

our boys come, nerve-racked, tense, exhausted by their sleepless vigil and 
harassed with tragic memories. 

Rest they will have, but rest is not re-creation. Mind must relax as well 
as body. They must forget awhile, must turn their thoughts into their 
normal course before facing anew the horrors of the first-line trenches. 

Courage they have always, but we can put fresh heart into them; we 
can restore the high spirits of youth and send them singing into the fray. 

They Are Fighting for You — Show Your Appreciation 



When you give them arms, you give them 
only the instruments of your own defense ; 
when you give for the wounded, you give 
only in common humanity ; but when you 
give to the Y. M. C. A., you are extending 
to the boys the warm hand of gratitude, the 
last token of your appreciation of what they 
are doing for you. You are doing this by 
showing your interest in their welfare. 

The Y. M. C. A. furnishes to the boys, 
not only in its own "huts" — which are often 
close to the firing line — but in the trenches, 



the material and intangible comforts which 
mean much to morale. It furnishes free en- 
tertainment back of the lines. It supplies 
free writing paper and reading matter. It 
conducts all post exchanges, selling general 
merchandise without profit. It has charge 
of and encourages athletics, and conducts a 
"khaki college" for liberal education. Its 
religious work is non-sectarian and non- 
propagandist. It keeps alive in the boys 
"over there" the life and the spirit of "over 
here." 




GIVE NOW— BEFORE THEIR SACRIFICE IS MADE 

Seven allied activities, all endorsed by the Government, are combined in 
the United War Campaign, with the budgets distributed as follows: 
Y. M. C. A., $100,000,000; Y. W. C. A., $15,000,000; National Catholic 
War Council {including the work of the Knights of Columbus and 
special war activities for women), $30,000,000; Jewish Welfare Board, 
$.3,500,000; American Library Association, $3,500,000; War Camp Com- 
munity Service, $15,000,000; Salvation Army, $3,500,000. 




Contributed through Division of Advertising 




United States Gov't Committee on Public Information 



This space contributed for the winning of the war by the Publisher of Film Fun 




LEARN MUSIC 
AT HOME 




H. S. Whittmack, New 
York, writes : "I com- 
pliment you on your 
wonderful system. Did 
not know one note 
from another, but in a 
short time have mas- 
tered the piano and 
am now composing 
music." 




Louise Bowles, Ep- 
worth, Va., writes : 
"Received my teach- 
er's certificate. I high- 
ly recommend your 
school and wouldn't 
take anything for the 
help it has given me." 



Music no longer difficult! Learn to play your favorite 
instrument by note in a few short months — without a teacher 
at your elbow. New method. Easier than private teacher 
way. More than 200,000 men and women nave learned by 
our simplified home study method. You too can brighten 
your life with the ability to play. Write today for free 
book and particulars of free lessons offer. 

LESSONS FREE 

We want to have one pupil in each locality at once to help 
advertise our home study method. For a short time, 
therefore, we offer our marvelous lessons FREE. 
Only charge is for postage and sheet music — 
which is small. Beginners or advanced pupils. 



Why Be A 
Wall-Flower? 

No longer need the ability to play 
music be shut out of your life ! 
Now at last you can learn music- 
how to play any instrument — at 
home — yet without having a teacher 
at your elbow. By our wonderful 
home study method we have made it 
easy for you to play your favorite 
instrument by note. 

No tiresome, " dry " exercises, 
no inconvenience, no trick music, 
no "numbers," yet simple, wonder- 
ful, easy for even a child. Now 
you can bring into your own life 
and the lives of others endless pleas- 
ure and happiness through your 
music. Instead of being a forsaken 
"wall flower" you will be the most 
popular person in your set. 



r r *fe' 




C. N. Pitts, Macon, 
Ga., writes : " Have 
completed your course 
on violin — now have 15 
students." 



Mail the Coupon 

Write today for amazing free book, giving all the 
facts and particulars. Act quick and get your 
lessons free. Send the coupon or a postal. Do it 
now before you turn this page. 

U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

3211 Brunswick Bldg., - New York City /'*■'< 




ilm 



And The Magazine 
of Fun, Judge's 
Library and Sis Hopkins' 
Own Book Combined 



un 

CHRIS 




Price 15 Cents 
DECEMBER 
19 18 



NOTICE TO 
HEADER. 

When you finish read- 
ing this majfiizine, place 
a one-cent stamp on this 
notice, mail the maga- 
zine, and it will be 
placed in the hands of 
our soldiers or sailors 
destined to proceed 
overseas. 

NO WRAPPING 
-NO ADDRESS. 




COPYRIGHTED, 1918, BY FILM FUN 



ON GUARD AGAINST GLOOM 




tyfie Crystal of Life 



A HE motion picture is l